Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

5.4 Coding Multiple Congenital Anomalies

 

Expected time: 15 minutes

Approximately 75% of babies with major congenital anomalies present as isolated anomalies, and the remaining 25% have more than one major anomaly.

Neonates with one or more major anomalies may also have one or more minor anomalies.

  • For more details about the types of congenital anomalies according to clinical presentation, please refer to Appendix C of WHO/CDC/ICBDSR Birth defects surveillance: a manual for programme managers (4).
  • A detailed description of each major anomaly should always be recorded when more than one congenital anomaly is present.

 

Most congenital anomalies surveillance programmes allow for coding at least 10 anomalies.

 

Major anomalies should always be coded on the data-collection form before minor anomalies, when filling the available coding spaces. Coding major anomalies in cranio-caudal order can be helpful, especially when a review is necessary. A thorough description of the observed anomaly is very important for an accurate diagnosis and, therefore, an accurate coding of the congenital anomaly.

References

  1. World Health Organization. Congenital anomalies. Fact sheet No 370. October 2012 (http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs370/en/index.html  , accessed 29 April 2015).
  2. Resolution WHA63.17. Birth defects. In: Sixty-third World Health Assembly, Geneva,17–21 May 2010. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2010 (http://apps.who.int/gb/ebwha/pdf_files/WHA63/A63_R17-en.pdf, accessed 29 April 2015).
  3. International statistical classification of diseases and related health problems, 10th revision. Geneva: World Health organization; 2015 (http://apps.who.int/classifications/icd10/browse/2015/en  , accessed 24 February 2015).
  4. World Health Organization, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research (ICBDSR). Birth defects surveillance: a manual for programme managers. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2014 (https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/birthdefectscount/documents/bd-surveillance-manual.pdf, accessed 10 February 2015).
  5. World Health Organization, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC), International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research (ICBDSR). Birth defects surveillance: atlas of selected congenital anomalies. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2014 (http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/127941/1/9789241564762_eng.pdf?ua=1  , accessed 10 February 2015).
  6. CDC Foundation. What is public health? (http://www.cdcfoundation.org/content/what-public-health  , accessed 24 February 2015).

 Top of Page

TOP