libraryheader-short.png

Previous Issues

CDC Science Clips
Volume 13 - 2021

Volume 12 - 2020
  • Issue, 1 January 14, 2020
  • Issue, 2 January 21, 2020
  • Issue, 3 January 28, 2020
  • Issue, 4 February 4, 2020
  • Issue, 5 February 18, 2020
  • Issue, 6 February 25, 2020
  • Issue, 7 March 3, 2020
  • Issue, 8 March 10, 2020this week featuring articles in conjunction with March CDC Vital Signs, Colorectal Cancer Test Use – United States, 2018
  • Issue 9, March 17, 2020
  • Issue 10, March 23, 2020This week Science Clips is pleased to feature articles on the topic of p-Values. The American Statistical Association released a statement on p-Values and statistical inference in 2016, catalyzing conversations about statistical applications and literacy throughout the scientific community. In March 2019, The American Statistician released a special issue containing an introductory editorial that expanded from the 2016 statement and provided more specific guidance for using p-Values and “statistical significance” in analyses and reports. Following the introduction were 43 articles to offer p-Value complements, supplements, and replacements, as well as guidance for presenting statistical results in scientific reports. There is no consensus in the statistical community about the best methods to move forward, although there is consensus that it is time to reconsider current usage of p-values in the scientific literature. This Science Clips compilation comprises the American Statistical Association statements, select articles from the special issue of The American Statistician, and public health research articles that applied supplemental measures to p-Values. This compilation does not endorse these particular methods, but rather highlights the variety of methods for researchers to consider in order to adopt the American Statistical Association’s latest recommendations.
  • Issue 11, April 10, 2020This week, Science Clips is pleased to collaborate with CDC Vital Signs by featuring scientific articles from the latest issue on Hepatitis C Screening. The items marked with an asterisk may be of particular interest to clinicians and public health professionals seeking background information in this area.
  • Issue 12, April 14, 2020This week’s Science Clips is pleased to feature articles on sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in conjunction with STD Awareness Week. Featured articles highlight recent research on STDs, including studies that identify the often severe consequences of STDs, including congenital syphilis and disseminated gonococcal infection, as well as strategies to prevent STDs and their consequences in populations most affected including men who have sex with men, women, and persons at risk for HIV. STD Awareness Week, observed April 12-18, 2020, provides an opportunity to raise awareness about STDs and how they impact our lives; reduce STD-related stigma, fear, and discrimination; and ensure people have the tools and knowledge to prevent, test for, and treat STDs.  Because local prevention needs vary with the communities, CDC has provided diverse campaigns to choose from with different prevention focuses and audiences:
    • Get Yourself Tested (GYT) – Encourages young people to get tested and treated for STDs and HIV
    • Talk. Test. Treat. – Focuses on three simple actions individuals and healthcare providers can take to protect their health/their patient’s health: Talk, Test, Treat
    • Syphilis Strikes Back – Highlights the resurgence of syphilis and the specific threat against gay and bisexual men, pregnant women, and newborn babies
    • Treat Me Right – Underscores the need for strong patient-provider relationships to overcome the rising STD burden
  • Issue 13, April 28, 2020
  • Issue 14, May 5, 2020Last week (April 24-30) was World Immunization Week. During World Immunization Week (WIW) and every day, CDC celebrates health heroes who protect all of us—parents and caregivers, healthcare workers, frontline vaccinators, and our public health partners worldwide who work to save millions of lives from vaccine-preventable diseases. This year’s WIW is unlike any other. While we have made many gains toward eradication and elimination goals for vaccine-preventable diseases, we are focused on old and new challenges. The world has seen an increasing number of outbreaks of measles, diphtheria, yellow fever, vaccine-derived poliovirus, and other vaccine-preventable diseases over the past few years. Against this complex backdrop, we have the COVID-19 pandemic. This week’s Science Clips features recent CDC-authored articles on immunization and articles on established or emerging vaccine-preventable diseases. To learn more about WIW, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/globalhealth/immunization/WIW/.
  • Issue 15, May 15, 2020This week, Science Clips is pleased to collaborate with CDC Vital Signs by featuring scientific articles from the latest issue on Postpartum Depressive Symptoms and Provider Discussions About Perinatal Depression — United States, 2018. The articles marked with an asterisk are general review articles which may be of particular interest to clinicians and public health professionals seeking background information in this area.
  • Issue 16, May 26, 2020This week Science Clips is pleased to feature literature on the respiratory protection needs for healthcare personnel during times of epidemics and pandemics (https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/respirators-strategy/index.html?deliveryName=FCP_3_DM22504).
  • Issue 17, June 2, 2020This week Science Clips is pleased to feature articles from the CDC-organized Clinical Infectious Diseases supplement on “Plague and Bioterrorism Preparedness.” The introductory article notes: “In this supplement of Clinical Infectious Diseases, organized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we have assembled a series of articles that address the most pressing questions related to plague. These articles, representing careful and diligent research efforts, have been curated to bring together an essential evidence base on the treatment of plague and considerations for special populations. . . . The aim with this work is to increase resilience and national security against plague by advancing scientific and medical knowledge in order to inform preparedness. This collection of foundational articles and the expertise behind them will provide a basis for efforts to augment defenses against plague in both the natural and intentional release settings and, hopefully, will spur future research.”
  • Issue 18, June 9, 2020
  • Issue 19, June 16, 2020
  • Issue 20, June 22, 2020This week, CDC Science Clips is pleased to feature items related to the June CDC Public Health Grand Rounds: Smoking Cessation: Past, Present, and Future, which will present key findings on the recently released US Surgeon General’s report on Smoking Cessation. Smoking remains the leading preventable cause of death and disease in the United States. Although the percentage of adults who smoke is at an all-time low in the US, 34 million adults still smoke and therefore continue to be at risk of developing smoking-related diseases.
  • Issue 21, June 30, 2020
  • Issue 22, July 7, 2020
  • Issue 23, July 14, 2020
  • Issue 24, July 21, 2020This week, CDC Science Clips is pleased to feature items related to the July CDC Public Health Grand Rounds: Acute Flaccid Myelitis: Answering Questions Through National Collaboration. Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) is an uncommon but serious neurologic condition. It affects the nervous system and causes the muscles and reflexes in the body to become weak. Most AFM cases have been in young children. Cases have been increasing every other year in the United States since 2014. During this session of Public Health Grand Rounds, national AFM experts will discuss the epidemiology of AFM, along with the clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, and prevention research updates. Grand Rounds also will present a parent’s perspective on building an AFM support network in the United States.
  • Issue 25, July 28, 2020
  • Issue 26, August 4, 2020This week, Science Clips is pleased to collaborate with CDC Vital Signs by featuring scientific articles from the latest issue on Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Confirmed Acute Flaccid Myelitis, United States, 2018. The articles marked with an asterisk are general review articles which may be of particular interest to clinicians and public health professionals seeking background information in this area.
  • Issue 27, August 11, 2020
  • Issue 28, August 18, 2020This week, CDC Science Clips is pleased to feature items related to the August CDC Public Health Grand Rounds: Reducing Polysubstance Use in Pregnancy. The use of multiple substances, including tobacco, alcohol, and opioids, during pregnancy can have negative effects on a pregnant person and the developing baby. Research suggests that polysubstance use (using more than one substance at a time) during pregnancy is common. Recent evidence suggests that polysubstance use is highest during early pregnancy.
  • Issue 29, August 25, 2020This week’s Science Clips is pleased to feature articles under the topic of vaccine-preventable disease (VPD) in conjunction with National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM). NIAM is an annual observance held in August to highlight the importance of vaccination for people of all ages. Because local prevention needs vary with the communities, CDC has provided diverse campaigns to choose from with different prevention focuses and audiences. Articles are unique because they include at least one CDC author and make use of artificial intelligence/machine learning (Ai/ML) as follows: Classification Authors used Support Vector Machine models to introduce a novel approach to rapidly determine cladistic information for any number of genes without the need for time-consuming sequence alignment, phylogenetic tree construction, or manual annotation. Authors used Online Adaptive Lasso Auto Regressive methods to dynamically combine two distinct influenza tracking techniques to achieve improved state-level influenza activity estimates in the United States. Authors used Fast Artificial Neural Networks to verify and validate the performance of the FluChip-8G Insight assay for the detection and positive identification of human and animal origin non-seasonal influenza A specimens. Authors used Random Forest models to describe mothers' knowledge and attitudes about influenza illnesses and vaccination, and identify characteristics associated with mothers' intent to vaccinate their child. Authors discuss how machine learning has been used in vaccine informatics. Natural Language Processing Authors used Finite State Machine to describe negation in surveillance reports of adverse events following immunizations. Authors used rule-based algorithms to create a spelling error correction tool for surveillance reports of adverse events following immunizations. Authors used pyConText/NegEx software to identify local reaction associated with tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine in the Vaccine Safety Datalink. Authors used Stanford NLP algorithms to identify vaccine-related anaphylaxis from plain-text clinical notes.
  • Issue 30, September 1, 2020
  • Issue 31, September 8, 2020
  • Issue 32, September 16, 2020
  • Issue 33, September 22, 2020
  • Issue 34, September 29, 2020
  • Issue 35, October 7, 2020
  • Issue 36, October 14, 2020
  • Issue 37, October 20, 2020
  • Issue 38 October 27, 2020
  • Issue 39 November 3, 2020
  • Issue 40, November 10, 2020
  • Issue 41, November 17, 2020
  • Issue 42, November 24, 2020This week, Science Clips features articles on rural health, in conjunction with the observance of Rural Health Day on November 19.
  • Issue 43, December 1, 2020
  • Issue 44, December 14, 2020
  • Issue 45, December 21, 2020

Page last reviewed: June 4, 2021