Weekly Flu Vaccination Dashboard

Updated December 2, 2022

Weekly National Flu Vaccination Dashboard logo

The Weekly Influenza (Flu) Vaccination Dashboard is an exploratory data product designed to share preliminary weekly influenza vaccination data, including coverage estimates, using a variety of sources. The Dashboard will be updated regularly throughout each influenza season as new data become available. Final estimates for prior seasons and other flu vaccination data are available at CDC’s FluVaxView. Please email to share any feedback.

Final 2021-22 and earlier seasons vaccination coverage estimates for children and adults are posted at FluVaxView Interactive! and Coverage by Season, and those final estimates will differ slightly from the during-season estimates presented here.

The remaining updates for 2022 are planned for the following Fridays: December 9 and December 16.

Data and visualizations are updated during 10AM – 12PM ET. Data, visuals, and/or features may be changing and may not match their final state during this time.

Data Summary

Flu Vaccine Doses Distributed

  • For the 2022-23 season, as of November 19, 2022, 154.10 million doses of flu vaccine have been distributed in the United States. Data updated December 2, 2022
  • Flu vaccine is produced by private manufacturers, so supply depends on manufacturers. Vaccine manufacturers have projected that they will supply the United States with as many as 173.5 million to 183.5 million doses of influenza vaccines for the 2022-2023 season.
  • Additional information on supply for this and previous seasons are available.

Flu Vaccination Coverage

Flu vaccination coverage for children 6 months to 17 years based on CDC’s National Immunization Survey-Flu. Data updated December 2, 2022.

  • Coverage for the 2022-23 season as of November 19, 2022:
    • Vaccination coverage for all children as of week ending November 19, 2022 is the same as the estimate at the same time in November 2021 (40.0% compared with 40.0%) and 5.5 percentage points lower compared with same time in November 2020 (40.0% compared with 45.5%).
    • Figure 2D provides data about differences in vaccination coverage between race/ethnicity groups within a season and between seasons.
      • For this season so far, flu vaccination coverage estimates among children are similar across racial and ethnic groups.
      • For non-Hispanic, White children coverage is 3.4 percentage points lower this season compared with same time in November 2021 (40.2% compared with 43.6%).
      • For non-Hispanic, Black children, coverage is 8.7 percentage points higher this season compared with same time in November 2021 (37.7% compared with 29.0%).
      • For Hispanic children, coverage is 4.5 percentage points higher this season compared with same time in November 2021 (41.0% compared with 36.5%).
      • Coverage for children in the Other, non-Hispanic race/ethnicity group is similar season compared with their coverage last season (40.3% compared with 42.7%). The “Other, non-Hispanic race/ethnicity group” includes children who are Asian, American Indian or Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, multiracial, and children whose parents reported their race as “Other.”
    • Coverage estimates by metropolitan statistical area (MSA) groups were added to this page on November 15, 2022 to improve data availability for rural communities. National Rural Health Day is Thursday, November 17, 2022.
      • Coverage as of November 19 for children residing in rural areas (i.e. non-MSA group) is:
        • 13.5 percentage points lower compared with children living in suburban areas (i.e. MSA, non-central city group; 27.1% compared with 40.6%).
        • 16.4 percentage points lower compared with children living in urban areas (i.e. MSA, central city group; 27.1% compared with 43.5%).
    • For children living in rural areas, coverage this season is 6.2 percentage points lower than at the same time last season (27.1% compared with 33.3%).
    • Coverage for children living in suburban and rural areas is similar so far this season compared to their coverage at the same time last season.
    • Coverage this season for children 6 months to 4 years of age is 7.7 percentage points higher compared with children 5 to 12 years of age (48.6% compared with 40.9%) and 17.0 percentage points higher compared with children 13 to 17 years of age (48.6% compared with 31.6%).
    • Coverage for children 5 to 12 years of age is 9.3 percentage points higher compared with children 13 to 17 years of age (40.9% compared with 31.6%).
    • Coverage among states and DC ranges from 25.5% % to 53.0%; national coverage is 40.0%.
      • These estimates are based on six weeks of data and as the cumulative sample size increases, confidence intervals will narrow over time.
    • Additional flu vaccination data for children are available.

Flu vaccination coverage for pregnant persons 18 to 49 years based on data from CDC’s Vaccine Safety Datalink. Data updated December 2, 2022.

  • Data as of November 26, 2022:
    • Overall coverage as of end of October 2022 is 36.5% for all pregnant persons, lowest (20.6%) for non-Hispanic, Black pregnant persons, and highest (52.0%) for non-Hispanic, Asian pregnant persons.
    • Overall coverage at the end of October 2022 was 12.1 percentage points lower compared with the end of October 2021 (36.5% compared with 48.6%) and 21.7 percentage points lower than at the end of September 2020 (36.5% compared with 58.2%).
    • Flu vaccination coverage for pregnant persons was lower for all race/ethnicity groups at of the end of October 2022 compared with the end of October 2021:
        • 14.0 percentage points lower for non-Hispanic, White pregnant persons (36.8% compared to 50.8%)
        • 10.7 percentage points lower for Hispanic/Latino pregnant persons (34.6% compared to 45.3%)
        • 10.6 percentage points lower for non-Hispanic, Other race/ethnicity pregnant persons (36.7% compared to 47.3%). The ‘Other’ group includes pregnant persons who are American Indian or Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, and Multiple or Other race/ethnicities.
        • 15.1 percentage points lower for non-Hispanic, Asian pregnant persons (52.0% compared to 67.1%)
        • 4.8 percentage points lower for non-Hispanic, Black pregnant persons (20.6% compared to 25.4%)
    • Coverage estimates for November 2022 will be added on December 16, 2022.
    • Note: estimates for prior seasons for a given time period are based on the end-of-season estimates; the end-of-estimates are usually the highest estimate for that time period. For example, vaccination coverage for all pregnant persons for October 2021 when we first reported it in November 2021 was 40.8% but the end-of-season estimate for October 2021 was 48.6%. We are working to update data, visualizations, and notes to convey these expected changes over time and allow users to view and compare changes over time.

Flu vaccination coverage estimates among adults 18 and older based on CDC survey data. Data updated November 15, 2022 expect where noted.

  • ‘Figure 4’ is now updated to ‘Figure 4A’ and includes data for this season and data by Urbanicity. Figure 4B is added with maps comparing this season’s coverage to last season.  November estimates are expected to be posted December 9, 2022.
  • Based on data from the National Immunization Survey Adult COVID Module (NIS-ACM) conducted October 2022 and October 2021, (represents vaccination coverage as of approximately mid-October).
    • National coverage for all adults, including Puerto Rico, is 3.3 percentage points higher this season compared with the same time last season (26.3% compared with 23.0%).
    • Coverage among states and DC ranges from 18.9% to 35.6%. For most states, coverage this season is similar or higher than at the same time last season. Data updated December 2, 2022.
    • National Rural Health Day is Thursday, November 17, 2022.
      • Coverage this season for adults living in rural communities is:
        • 3.9 percentage points lower compared with adults living in suburban areas (22.1% compared with 26.0%).
        • 5.5 percentage points lower compared with adults living in urban areas (22.1% compared with 27.6%).
      • Coverage for adults living in rural areas this season is similar compared with last season (22.1% compared with 19.4%).
        • Coverage for adults living in urban areas is higher this season compared with last season (26.0% compared with 22.2%).
        • Coverage for adults living in suburban areas is higher this season compared with last season (27.6% compared with 24.5%).
    • Coverage for race/ethnicity groups comparing their coverage this season with the same time last season:
      • Coverage for non-Hispanic, Black adults is 5 percentage points higher this season compared with last season (23.5% compared with 18.5%).
      • Coverage for non-Hispanic, White adults is 4.2 percentage points higher this season compared with last season (29.4 compared with 25.2).
      • Coverage for these race/ethnicity groups is similar this season compared with last season:
        • Hispanic (17.8% compared with 18.2%)
        • Non-Hispanic, American Indian/Alaskan Native (22.0% compared with 22.2%)
        • Non-Hispanic, Other/Multiple races (23.1% compared with 16.8%). “Other/multiple races” includes adults who reported more than one race or who reported their race as “Other.”
        • Non-Hispanic, Pacific-Islander/Native Hawaiian (25.6% compared with 15.2%)
        • Non-Hispanic, Asian (28.6% compared with 29.0%)
    • Coverage comparing race/ethnicity groups this season:
      • Coverage is higher for non-Hispanic, White adults (29.4%) compared with Hispanic adults (17.8%), adults of non-Hispanic, Other/Multiple races (23.1%), and non-Hispanic, Black adults (23.5%).
      • Coverage for Hispanic adults is also lower (17.8%) compared with non-Hispanic Black adults (23.5%), and non-Hispanic Asian adults (28.6%).
    • Coverage for adults 65 years and older (45.6%) is 18.7 percentage points higher compared with adults 50 to 64 years of age (26.9%) and 26.9 percentage points higher compared with adults 18 to 49 years of age (18.8%).
  • Intent to receive influenza vaccination based on Ipsos and NORC Omnibus surveys conducted November 17-26, 2022
    • 40.4% of adults have already received a vaccine this year.
    • 19.6% probably or definitely will receive a vaccine this year.
    • 29.5% probably or definitely will not receive a vaccine this year.
    • 10.5% are unsure if they will get a vaccine this year.

Flu vaccination coverage among Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries aged ≥65 years based on claims data:

  • Estimates so far for the 2022-23 season as of October 1, 2022:
    • An estimated 14.6% of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries, 65 years and older, were vaccinated as of the end of September 2022.
    • This season so far, 8.3% of Hispanic adults, 10.3% of Black, non-Hispanic adults, 14.6% among adults of Other, non-Hispanic race/ethnicity, 15.0% of White, non-Hispanic adults, and 17.2% of Asian, non-Hispanic adults were vaccinated.
  • Estimates as of the end of last flu season (2021-22):
    • 54.0% overall among adults as of May 28, 2022 at the end of 2021-22 compared with 57.8% at the end of 2020-21, and 56.2% at the end of 2019-20.
    • As of May 28, 2022, an estimated 34.4% of Hispanic adults, 40.0% of Black, non-Hispanic adults, 51.7% among adults of Other, non-Hispanic race/ethnicity, and 55.5% of White, non-Hispanic adults, and 54.5% of Asian, non-Hispanic adults were vaccinated.

Flu Vaccination Locations:

For the 2022-23 season, for adults 18 and older:

  • An estimated 1.7 million more doses have been administered in pharmacies this season as of week ending November 12, 2022 compared with the same time in November 2021 (32.57M compared with 30.86M).  Data updated December 2, 2022.
  • An estimated 4.1 fewer doses have been administered in physician medical offices this season so far as of week ending November 12, 2022 compared with the same time in November 2021 (19.16M compared with 23.27 million). Data updated December 2, 2022.
  • Data for vaccinations received at workplaces and other locations are not available.
Data & Charts
Doses Distributed
Child Coverage
Pregnant Person Coverage
Adult Coverage
Adult 65+ Coverage
Adult Doses Administered
AI / AN Vaccination Data
Prevent Flu

Everyone 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine every season with rare exceptions.

Vaccination is particularly important for people who are at higher risk of serious complications from influenza.

You can get a COVID-19 vaccine and a flu vaccine at the same time.