Burden of Tobacco Use in the U.S.

Current Cigarette Smoking Among U.S. Adults Aged 18 Years and Older

Tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of death and disease in the United States. Cigarette smoking kills more than 480,000 Americans each year.1 In addition, smoking-related illness in the United States costs more than $300 billion a year, including nearly $170 billion in direct medical care for adults and $156 billion in lost productivity.1, 2

In 2018, an estimated 13.7% (34.2 million) of U.S. adults were current cigarette smokers. Of these, 74.6% smoked every day.3

Percentage of adults aged ≥18 years who reported cigarette use “every day” or “some days,” by selected characteristics — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 20183

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by sex.
 By Sex Percentage
Male 15.6%
Female 12.0%

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by age.
By Age Group (yrs) Percentage
18–24 7.8%
25–44 16.5%
45–64 16.3%
≥65   8.4%

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by race/ethnicity.
By Race/Ethnicity Percentage
White, non-Hispanic 15.0%
Black, non-Hispanic 14.6%
Asian, non-Hispanic 7.1%
American Indian/Alaska Native, non-Hispanic 22.6%
Hispanic 9.8%
Multirace, non-Hispanic 19.1%

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by U.S. Census region.
 By U.S. Census Region Percentage
Northeast 12.5%
Midwest 16.2%
South 14.8%
West 10.7%

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by level of education.
By Education (adults aged ≥25 yrs) Percentage
0–12 yrs (no diploma) 21.8%
GED 36.0%
High school diploma 19.7%
Some college, no degree 18.3%
Associate degree (academic or technical/vocational) 14.8%
Undergraduate degree (bachelor’s)   7.1%
Graduate degree (Master’s, doctoral or professional   3.7%

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by marital status.
By Marital Status Percentage
Married/Living with partner 12.5%
Divorced/Separated/Widowed 18.1%
Single/Never married/Not living with partner 13.9%

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by annual household income.
By Annual Household Income Percentage
<35,000 21.3%
35,000–74,999 14.9%
75,000–99,999 13.3%
≥100,000 7.3%

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by sexual orientation.
 By Sexual Orientation Percentage
Heterosexual/Straight 13.5%
Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual 20.6%

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by health insurance coverage.
By Health Insurance Coverage Percentage
Private insurance 10.5%
Medicaid 23.9%
Medicare only (aged ≥65 yrs) 9.4%
Other public insurance 17.4%
Uninsured 23.9%

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by disability/limitation.
 By Disability/Limitation Percentage
Yes 19.2%
No 13.1%

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by serious psychological distress.
 By Serious Psychological Distress Percentage
Yes 31.6%
No 13.0%

Current cigarette smokers were defined as persons who had smoked ≥100 cigarettes during their lifetime and now smoked cigarettes either every day or some days.

Percentage of adults aged ≥18 years who reported cigarette use “every day” or “some days,” by selected characteristics — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 20183

 

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by sex.
 By Sex Percentage
Male 15.6%
Female 12.0%

 

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by age.
By Age Group (yrs) Percentage
18–24 7.8%
25–44 16.5%
45–64 16.3%
≥65   8.4%

 

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by race/ethnicity.
By Race/Ethnicity Percentage
White, non-Hispanic 15.0%
Black, non-Hispanic 14.6%
Asian, non-Hispanic 7.1%
American Indian/Alaska Native, non-Hispanic 22.6%
Hispanic 9.8%
Multirace, non-Hispanic 19.1%

 

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by U.S. Census region.
 By U.S. Census Region Percentage
Northeast 12.5%
Midwest 16.2%
South 14.8%
West 10.7%

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by level of education.
By Education (adults aged ≥25 yrs) Percentage
0–12 yrs (no diploma) 21.8%
GED 36.0%
High school diploma 19.7%
Some college, no degree 18.3%
Associate degree (academic or technical/vocational) 14.8%
Undergraduate degree (bachelor’s)   7.1%
Graduate degree (Master’s, doctoral or professional   3.7%

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by marital status.
By Marital Status Percentage
Married/Living with partner 12.5%
Divorced/Separated/Widowed 18.1%
Single/Never married/Not living with partner 13.9%

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by annual household income.
By Annual Household Income Percentage
<35,000 21.3%
35,000–74,999 14.9%
75,000–99,999 13.3%
≥100,000 7.3%

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by sexual orientation.
 By Sexual Orientation Percentage
Heterosexual/Straight 13.5%
Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual 20.6%

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by health insurance coverage.
By Health Insurance Coverage Percentage
Private insurance 10.5%
Medicaid 23.9%
Medicare only (aged ≥65 yrs) 9.4%
Other public insurance 17.4%
Uninsured 23.9%

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by disability/limitation.
 By Disability/Limitation Percentage
Yes 19.2%
No 13.1%

The cigarette smoking rates of adults within the United States, organized by serious psychological distress.
 By Serious Psychological Distress Percentage
Yes 31.6%
No 13.0%

Current cigarette smokers were defined as persons who had smoked ≥100 cigarettes during their lifetime and now smoked cigarettes either every day or some days.

Current Cigarette Smoking Among Specific Populations—United States

American Indians/Alaska Natives (Non-Hispanic)

American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) have a higher prevalence of current smoking than most other racial/ethnic groups in the United States.3 Factors that may affect smoking prevalence include sacred tobacco’s ceremonial, religious, and medicinal roles in Native culture, which may affect attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors toward commercial tobacco use.4 Also, tobacco sold on tribal lands is typically not subject to state and national taxes, which reduces costs. Lower prices are connected with increased smoking rates.1

  • In 2018, 22.6% of AI/AN adults in the United States smoked cigarettes, compared with 13.7% of U.S. adults overall.3

Asians (Non-Hispanic)

Asian Americans represent a wide variety of languages, dialects, and cultures.5 While non-Hispanic Asian adults have the lowest current cigarette smoking prevalence of any racial/ethnic group in the United States, there are significant differences in smoking prevalence among subgroups in this population.5 Many Asian Americans emigrate from countries where smoking prevalence is high and smoking among men is the social norm. However, research also shows an association between cigarette smoking and acculturation among Asian Americans, with those having higher English-language proficiency and those living in the United States longer being less likely to smoke.4

  • In 2018, 7.1% of non-Hispanic Asian adults in the United States smoked cigarettes, compared with 13.7% of U.S. adults overall.3

Among Asian adult subpopulations in the U.S., current smoking prevalence is higher among Korean and Vietnamese respondents compared with Filipino, Japanese, Asian Indian, and Chinese respondents.5 Among women, smoking prevalence is highest among Koreans and lowest among Chinese. Among men, smoking prevalence is highest among Vietnamese and lowest among Asian Indians.5

Blacks (Non-Hispanic)

Although prevalence of cigarette smoking is lower among non-Hispanic Black high school students than among U.S. high school students overall (3.2% compared with 8.1% in 20186, respectively), smoking prevalence among non-Hispanic Black adults is similar to the overall adult population.3,6

  • In 2018, 14.6% of non-Hispanic Black adults in the United States smoked cigarettes, compared with 13.7% of U.S. adults overall.3
  • Current smoking prevalence among non-Hispanic Blacks declined from 21.5% in 2005 to 14.6% in 2018.1,3

Hispanics

The prevalence of cigarette smoking among Hispanics is generally lower than the prevalence among other racial/ethnic groups in the United States, with the exception of non-Hispanic Asians. However, smoking prevalence among Hispanic men is significantly higher than among Hispanic women, and there are significant differences in smoking prevalence among subgroups in this population.3,5  Research also shows that acculturation plays a role and that smoking prevalence is higher among Hispanics who were born in the United States.7

  • In 2018, 9.8% of Hispanic adults in the United States smoked cigarettes, compared with 13.7% among U.S. adults overall.3
  • Current smoking prevalence among Hispanics declined from 16.2% in 2005 to 9.8% in 2018.1,3

Among Hispanic adult subpopulations in the U.S., current smoking prevalence is higher among Puerto Rican adults compared with Cuban, Mexican, and Central or South American adults.5 Among both men and women, smoking prevalence is highest among Puerto Ricans, and lowest among Central or South Americans.5

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT)

Smoking prevalence among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals in the United States is higher than among heterosexual/straight individuals.3,8  This may be in part due to the aggressive marketing of tobacco products to this community. LGBT individuals also are likely to have risk factors for smoking that include daily stress related to prejudice and stigma that they can face.9

  • In 2018, the prevalence of current cigarette smoking among lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults was 20.6%, compared with 13.5% among adult heterosexual/straight adults.3

Military Service Members and Veterans

In the United States, cigarette smoking prevalence is higher among people currently serving in the military than among the civilian population.10,11 Cigarette smoking prevalence is even higher among military personnel who have been deployed.10

  • Among military veterans, 29.2% of veterans reported current tobacco product use.12
  • Cigarettes were the most commonly used tobacco product among veterans, at 21.6%.12

The high prevalence of tobacco use among military and veteran personnel has a significant financial impact. During 2010, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) spent an estimated $2.7 billion on smoking-related ambulatory care, prescription drugs, hospitalization, and home health care.12

Women Who Are Pregnant or Planning to Become Pregnant

Overall, there have been slight decreases in cigarette smoking during pregnancy and after delivery between 2000 and 2010, but for the majority of states, smoking prevalence before, during, or after pregnancy did not change over time, according to a study using Pregnancy Risk Assessment and Monitoring Survey (PRAMS) data.13

In 2010, data from 27 PRAMS sites, representing 52% of live births, showed that among women with recent live births:13

  • About 23% reported smoking in the 3 months prior to pregnancy.
    • More than half of these smokers (54%) reported that they quit smoking by the last 3 months of pregnancy.
  • Almost 11% reported smoking during the last 3 months of pregnancy.
  • Almost 16% reported smoking after delivery.

Among racial and ethnic groups, smoking during pregnancy was highest among AI/ANs (26.0%) and lowest among Asians/Pacific Islanders (2.1%).13

The highest prevalence of smoking after delivery was reported in women aged 20–24 years (25.5%), AI/ANs (40.1%), those who had less than 12 years of education (24.5%), and those who had Medicaid coverage during pregnancy or delivery (24.3%).13

The cigarette smoking rates of women who smoked before, during and after pregnancy13

The cigarette smoking status of women with recent live births in 2010.
Smoking Status—Women With Recent Live Births, 2010 Prevalence*
Smoked before pregnancy 23.2%
Smoked during pregnancy 10.7%
Smoked after delivery 15.9%

People Living With HIV

Cigarette smoking prevalence is estimated to be at least two times higher among adults living with HIV than in the general population.14,15,16 Advances in science mean that HIV is now a chronic, manageable disease. Many people with HIV lead healthy lives. However, smoking has serious health effects on people with HIV, including higher risks for cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), heart disease, stroke, and HIV-related infections, including bacterial pneumonia.14

  • In 2014, among adults with HIV, 37.9% were current cigarette smokers.17
  • Factors associated with higher smoking prevalence among adults with HIV include:16
    • Race/ethnicity: Non-Hispanic Whites and non-Hispanic Blacks are more likely to smoke than Hispanics and Latinos.
    • Education: Persons who only achieved a high school education or less are more likely to smoke than those with more than a high school education.
    • Poverty level: Persons living below the poverty level are more likely to smoke than those living at or above the poverty level.

People With Mental Health Conditions

Approximately 1 in 4 (or 25%) of adults in the U.S. have some form of mental illness or substance use disorder, and these adults consume almost 40% of all cigarettes smoked by adults overall.18

  • In 2016, 28% of adults with any mental illness reported current use of cigarettes compared to 18.4% of adults with no mental illness.19

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) defines mental illness as any diagnosable mental, behavioral, or emotional disorder and defines substance use disorder as dependence or abuse of alcohol or illicit drugs.20

Adults With Disabilities

Adults with disabilities are more likely to be cigarette smokers than those without disabilities. This might be because a smoker’s disability is the result of smoking or because of possible higher stress associated with disabilities.3

  • In 2018, the prevalence of current cigarette smoking among adults with disabilities was 19.2% compared with 13.1% among adults with no disability.3

References

  1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014 [accessed 2019 Feb 1].
  2. Xu X, Bishop EE, Kennedy SM, Simpson SA, Pechacek TF. Annual Healthcare Spending Attributable to Cigarette Smoking: An Updateexternal icon. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2015;48(3):326–33 [accessed 2019 Feb 1].
  3. Creamer MR, Wang TW, Babb S, et al. Tobacco Product Use and Cessation Indicators Among Adults – United States, 2018. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2019; volume 68(issue 45): pages. [accessed 2019 Nov 25].
  4. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Tobacco Use Among U.S. Racial/Ethnic Minority Groups—African Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, Hispanics: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 1998 [accessed 2019 Feb 1].
  5. Martell BN, Garrett BE, Caraballo RS. Disparities in Adult Cigarette Smoking—United States, 2002–2005 and 2010–2013. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2016; 65:753–758. DOI: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6530a1.htm [accessed 2019 Feb 1].
  6. Gentzke AS, Creamer M, Cullen KA, et al. Vital Signs: Tobacco Product Use Among Middle and High School Students — United States, 2011–2018. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2019;68:157–164. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6806e1external icon [accessed 2019 February 20].
  7. Kaplan RC, Bandiwala SI, Barnhart JM, Castañeda SF, Gellman MD, Lee DJ, Pérez-Stable EJ, Talavera GA, Youngblood ME, Giachello AL. Smoking Among U.S. Hispanic/Latino Adults: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinosexternal icon. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2014;46(5):496–506 [accessed 2019 Feb 1].
  8. King BA, Dube SR, Tynan MA. Current Tobacco Use Among Adults in the United States: Findings From the National Adult Tobacco Surveyexternal icon. American Journal of Public Health 2012;102(11):e93–e100 [accessed  2019 Feb 1].
  9. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults—United States, 2005–2013. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2014;69(47):1108–12 [accessed 2019 Feb 1].
  10. Institute of Medicine. Combating Tobacco in Military and Veteran Populationsexternal icon. Washington: The National Academies Press, 2009 [accessed 2019 Feb 1].
  11. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Quick Stats: Current Smoking Among Men Aged 25–64 Years, by Age Group and Veteran Status—National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), United States, 2007–201 pdf icon[PDF – 863KB]. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2012;61(45):929 [accessed 2019 Feb 1].
  12. Odani S, Agaku IT, Graffunder CM, Tynan MA, Armour BS. Tobacco Product Use Among Military Veterans — United States, 2010–2015. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2018;67:7–12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6701a2external icon [accessed 2018 Dec 19].
  13. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Trends in Smoking Before, During, and After Pregnancy—Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, United States, 40 Sites, 2000–2010. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2013;62(SS06)1–19 [accessed 2019 Feb 1].
  14. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. AIDS.gov: HIV and Smokingexternal icon [last updated 2018 Nov 8; accessed 2019 Feb 1].
  15. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration. Guide for HIV/AIDS Clinical Careexternal icon, 2014 [accessed 2019 Feb 1].
  16. Mdodo R, Frazier EL, Dube SR, Mattson CL, Sutton MY, Brooks JT, Skarbinski J. Cigarette Smoking Prevalence Among Adults With HIV Compared With the General Adult Population in the United States: Cross-Sectional Surveysexternal icon. Annals of Internal Medicine 2015;162:335–44 [accessed 2019 Feb 1].
  1. Frazier, EL, Sutton, MY, Brooks, JT, Shouse, RL, Weiser, J. Trends in cigarette smoking among adults with HIV compared with the general adult population, United States – 2009–2014. Preventative Medicine. 2018;111:231-234. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.03.007 external icon[accessed 2019 February 25].
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Tobacco Use Among Adults with Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders. National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. [updated 2019 Jan 7; last accessed 2019 Feb 7].
  3. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Results from the 2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Detailed Tables. pdf icon[PDF–35 MB]external icon Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, 2017 [accessed 2019 Feb 7].
  4. Lipari R, Van Horn S. Smoking and Mental Illness Among Adults in the United States.external icon The CBHSQ Report: March 30, 2017. Rockville, MD: Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration [accessed 2019 Feb 7].