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Recall & Advice to Consumers and Retailers

Multistate Outbreak of Listeriosis Linked to Soft Raw Milk Cheese Made by Vulto Creamery

Recall

Ouleout Cheese On March 7, 2017, Vulto Creamery recalled all lots of Ouleout, Miranda, Heinennellie, and Willowemoc soft wash-rind raw milk cheeses. On March 10, Vulto Creamery expanded its recall to include all lots of four additional cheeses, by the name of Andes, Blue Blais, Hamden, and Walton Umber.

The raw milk cheeses were distributed nationwide, with most being sold at retail locations in the northeastern and Mid-Atlantic States, California, Chicago, Portland, Oregon, and Washington, D.C.

Advice to Consumers, Restaurants, and Retailers

Consumers should not eat, and restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell, recalled raw milk cheeses made by Vulto Creamery.

  • The recall includes all lots of the following types of raw milk cheeses:
    • Heinennellie
    • Miranda
    • Willowemoc
    • Ouleout
    • Andes
    • Blue Blais
    • Hamden
    • Walton Umber
  • The raw milk cheeses were distributed nationwide, with most being sold at retail locations in the northeastern and Mid-Atlantic states, California, Chicago, Portland, Oregon, and Washington, D.C.
  • This advice is particularly important for consumers at higher risk for listeriosis, including pregnant women, adults 65 and older, and people with weakened immune systems.

Follow these steps if recalled cheese is in your home or establishment:

  • Throw the cheese away in a closed plastic bag placed in a sealed trash can. This will prevent people and animals from eating it.
  • Wash the refrigerator drawer and other areas where the cheese was stored with hot water and soap.
  • Wash cutting boards, surfaces, and utensils used to cut, serve, or store recalled cheese. If possible, use a dishwasher; otherwise, use hot water and soap, followed by sanitizing with a solution of one tablespoon chlorine bleach added to one gallon of hot water.
  • Wash your hands with warm water and soap after cleaning up.

What should you do if you ate recalled cheese?

  • If you have eaten a recalled cheese and do not have any symptoms, most experts believe that tests or treatment are not needed, even for people at higher risk for listeriosis.
  • People who develop symptoms of listeriosis after eating possibly contaminated products should consider seeking medical care and telling a healthcare provider about eating that product. Although people can sometimes develop listeriosis up to 2 months after eating contaminated food, symptoms usually start within several days.

Who is most at risk for listeriosis?
People at higher risk for listeriosis include:

  • Pregnant women and their newborns,
  • Adults 65 and older, and
  • People with weakened immune systems.
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