HIV

Entitled, “HIV in Uganda”, this image was captured by CDC Audio-Visual Production Specialist, Susy Mercado, with NCHM. The photo depicts a newborn in Kampala, Uganda, receiving an antiviral drug to prevent the mother-to-child transmission of HIV. This photo earned Susy the Second Place award in the 2006 CDC Connects Annual Public Health in Action Photo Contest, in the category of “International Programs”.

Entitled, “HIV in Uganda”, this image was captured by CDC Audio-Visual Production Specialist, Susy Mercado, with NCHM. The photo depicts a newborn in Kampala, Uganda, receiving an antiviral drug to prevent the mother-to-child transmission of HIV. This photo earned Susy the Second Place award in the 2006 CDC Connects Annual Public Health in Action Photo Contest, in the category of “International Programs”.
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HIV is a virus spread through certain body fluids that attacks the body’s immune system, specifically the CD4 cells, often called T cells. Over time, HIV can destroy so many of these cells that the body can’t fight off infections and disease. These special cells help the immune system fight off infections. Untreated, HIV reduces the number of CD4 cells (T cells) in the body. This damage to the immune system makes it harder and harder for the body to fight off infections and some other diseases. For the first time in modern history, the world has the tools to control the HIV epidemic without a vaccine or cure, while laying the groundwork to eventually end HIV. Controlling the epidemic requires accelerating reaching those groups at greatest risk for HIV with treatment and prevention.

What is the global impact of HIV?

  • There were approximately 37.9 million people worldwide living with HIV at the end of 2018. More than two-thirds are living in Sub-Saharan Africa.
  • Despite the existence of medications that can control HIV and even reduce viral transmission, HIV is still a leading cause of death and a health threat to millions worldwide. In 2018, approximately 770,000 people died of AIDS-related causes and 1.7 million people were newly infected with HIV.

What is CDC doing?

  • For more than three decades, CDC has been a leader in global HIV research and response. As an implementing agency of the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), CDC works side by side with Ministries of Health, leveraging our scientific and technical expertise to help deliver high impact, sustainable prevention, care and treatment to millions of people in countries most affected by HIV.
  • As of September 30, 2017, CDC supported life-saving ART for 7.3 million people living with HIV – more than half of people on PEPFAR-supported treatment.
  • CDC’s Division of Global HIV & TB is working with country partners to:
    • Scale up the use of ART among people living with HIV
    • Strengthen the ability of national governments to provide top-notch, sustainable HIV services
    • Deliver the most effective prevention tools to individuals at high risk for HIV infection
    • Use data to reach high-risk groups, inform public health policies and strategies, and measure our impact

At CDC, we are committed to using innovative, evidence-based strategies to fight this epidemic worldwide. Our goal is to save lives and, ultimately, bring an end to the HIV epidemic.

Rwanda on Track to Achieve HIV Epidemic Control
Community workers in a local citizen’s home after collecting blood samples

“Results from the Rwanda Population-based HIV Impact Assessment (RPHIA) show that 76 percent of all HIV-positive adults, including almost 80 percent of HIV-positive women, have achieved viral load suppression, a widely used measure of effective HIV treatment in a population. This surpasses the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) target of 73 percent by 2020. Rwanda has made tremendous progress by reaching or exceeding the UNAIDS 90–90–90 targets external icon, particularly among women, and nationally by attaining 84–98–90 among adults.”

Learn More:

CDC and PEPFAR have contributed to a global increase in testing facilities with the capacity to perform clinical lab tests.

CDC and PEPFAR have contributed to a global increase in testing facilities with the capacity to perform clinical lab tests.

A young girl and boy outside of their family home in the Kibera informal settlement in Nairobi, Kenya.

A young girl and boy outside of their family home in the Kibera informal settlement in Nairobi, Kenya.

On a rotating basis, these members of a community support group in Mozambique collect and distribute HIV medications to each other, which helps them to maintain their treatment.

On a rotating basis, these members of a community support group in Mozambique collect and distribute HIV medications to each other, which helps them to maintain their treatment.

CDC, as part of the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), supported life-saving treatment for more than 450,000 HIV-positive pregnant women to prevent transmission to their babies.

CDC, as part of the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), supported life-saving treatment for more than 450,000 HIV-positive pregnant women to prevent transmission to their babies.

A girl leans against a tree in the village of Usoma, Kenya.

A girl leans against a tree in the village of Usoma, Kenya.

A group of women waiting to receive health services at the Chakari Health Clinic in the province of Mashonaland West, Zimbabwe.

A group of women waiting to receive health services at the Chakari Health Clinic in the province of Mashonaland West, Zimbabwe.

Rwanda PHIA data collector handing over blood samples to the driver to be transported to the satellite laboratory.

Rwanda PHIA data collector handing over blood samples to the driver to be transported to the satellite laboratory.

Rwanda PHIA field practice

Rwanda PHIA field practice

Rwanda PHIA team conducting community mobilization

Rwanda PHIA team conducting community mobilization

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Page last reviewed: November 1, 2019
Content source: Global Health