By the Numbers: Diabetes in America

Source: National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2022

37.3 million Americans have diabetes, and 1 in 5 don't know it

Total Diabetes

From 2001 to 2020, diabetes prevalence significantly increased among US adults 18 or older.

  • 37.3 million people have diabetes—that’s 11.3% of the US population.
  • 28.7 million people have been diagnosed with diabetes.
  • 8.5 million people who have diabetes have not been diagnosed and do not know they have it.

Total Prediabetes

  • 96 million US adults have prediabetes.
  • 26.4 million adults 65 or older have prediabetes.

Cost of Diabetes

  • The total estimated cost of diagnosed diabetes in 2017 was $327 billion, including $237 billion in direct medical costs and $90 billion in lost productivity.
  • Excess medical costs associated with diabetes were $9,601 per person in 2017.

Diabetes Disparities

By Race and Ethnicity

Certain racial and ethnic groups are at a higher risk of developing diabetes than other groups.

Percentage of US Adults 18 or Older With Diagnosed Diabetes, by Race and Ethnicity, 2018–2019

Race and Ethnicity Percentage
Percentage of US Adults 18 or Older With Diagnosed Diabetes, by Race and Ethnicity, 2018–2019
American Indian or Alaska Native 14.5
Asian, non-Hispanic 9.5
Black, non-Hispanic 12.1
Hispanic, overall 11.8
White, non-Hispanic 7.4

Data sources: 2018–2019 National Health Interview Survey, except the American Indian and Alaska Native data, which are from the Indian Health Service National Data Warehouse (2019 data only).

By Education Level

People who have not completed high school have the highest prevalence of diabetes. People with more than a high school education have the lowest prevalence.

Percentage of US Adults 18 or Older With Diagnosed Diabetes, by Education Level, 2018–2019

Education Level Percentage
Percentage of US Adults 18 or Older With Diagnosed Diabetes, by Education Level, 2018–2019
Less than high school 13.4
High school 9.2
More than high school 7.1

Data source: 2018–2019 National Health Interview Survey.

By Income Level

Adults with a family income below the federal poverty level (FPL) have the highest prevalence of diabetes.

US Adults 18 or Older With Diagnosed Diabetes, by Family Income Level, 2018–2019

Family Income Level Percentage
US Adults 18 or Older With Diagnosed Diabetes, by Family Income Level, 2018–2019
Less than 100% FPL 14.1
100%–299% FPL 10.8
300%–499% FPL 7.8
500% FPL or more 5.6

Data source: 2018–2019 National Health Interview Survey.

Among Youth by Diabetes Type

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is most often diagnosed in children, teens, and young adults. Rates differ by racial and ethnic group.

During 2002–2010, Hispanic children and adolescents had the largest increases in type 1 diabetes compared to other groups. During 2011–2015, the largest increases were among non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander children and adolescents.

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes usually develops later in a person’s life. However, in recent decades, type 2 diabetes has increased among US children and adolescents aged 10 to 19. Rates differ by racial and ethnic group.

Trends in Incidence of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes in Children and Adolescents, Overall and by Race and Ethnicity, 2002–2015

Line chart displaying Type 1 Diabetes age 0-19 years old from years 2003 to 2015 with White, non-Hispanic having the most incidences and Asian Pacific Islander, non-Hispanic having the least. Another line chart displaying Type 2 Diabetes ages 10 to 19 years old during the years 2003 to 2015 with Black, non-Hispanic leading the number of incidences and White, non-Hispanic with the least incidences.

Data source: SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study.

Page last reviewed: March 28, 2022