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About Us

Turning the Tide

More than 30 million people in the United States have diabetes. 84 million adults have prediabetes. That’s nearly a third of Americans who have diabetes or are at high risk for type 2 diabetes. This is one of the most serious public health problems our nation has ever faced, and it has enormous and far-reaching consequences.

CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation believes in the power of science to turn the tide in the diabetes epidemic. We are dedicated to putting that science into action through programs and policies that help people prevent type 2 diabetes and improve the health of everyone living with diabetes. We continue to make important strides with the understanding that much more needs to be done.

Our Vision

A world free of the devastation of diabetes.

Our Mission

To reduce the preventable burden of diabetes through public health leadership, partnership, research, programs, and policies that translate science into practice.

Our Approach

Measure the impact of diabetes on our nation’s health and health care system.

Increase awareness of type 2 diabetes risk and the importance of prevention.

Translate science into proven, high-quality programs to prevent type 2 diabetes and manage diabetes.

Improve access to health care, including prevention and self-management education programs.

Fund partners to expand and support our programs to reach all Americans who need them.

Our Focus

Help millions lower their risk for type 2 diabetes, and prevent or delay serious diabetes complications.

Promoting prevention

  • Conduct research and track trends that inform efforts to prevent type 2 diabetes, prevent or reduce diabetes complications, and promote health equity.
  • Increase awareness of the risk factors and behaviors that contribute to prediabetes and type 2 diabetes.
  • Increase access to and participation in the National Diabetes Prevention Program lifestyle change program.

Supporting self-management

Our Reach

Science

We collect, study, and share data on new and existing cases of diabetes, risk factors, care practices, and complications at county, state, and national levels. We evaluate existing data to understand how real-world policies and programs affect diabetes prevention and care. We provide the nation’s first and only ongoing assessment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes trends in Americans younger than 20 years. These data and insights form the foundation of our targeted prevention and management efforts.

Awareness

We lead the first-ever national prediabetes awareness campaign — DoIHavePrediabetes.org — to encourage millions of people to find out their risk and take steps to prevent type 2 diabetes. Our “Your Health with Joan Lunden and CDC” broadcast miniseries provides an in-depth exploration of diabetes topics and shares the latest information on prevention and management. We continuously apply insights gained from these campaigns to create unique, compelling, and actionable messaging to reach our key audiences.

Prevention

Our proven lifestyle change program, part of the CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program, helps people with prediabetes take small, manageable steps proven to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. Participants learn how to eat healthy, be more active, deal with stress, cope with everyday challenges, and gain skills to maintain their healthy changes. We are dedicated to increasing access to, enrollment in, and completion of the program, as well as encouraging coverage among insurers and employers.

Education

We work to increase access to DSMES services, which help people manage daily diabetes care—checking blood sugar, eating healthy food, being active, taking medicines, and handling stress. DSMES has been shown to lower A1C levels, prevent or lessen diabetes complications, and improve quality of life. DSMES services can also lower medical expenses for people with diabetes and reduce the financial impact of diabetes on the US health care system.

  • Page last reviewed: October 10, 2018
  • Page last updated: October 10, 2018
  • Content source:
  • Maintained By:
    • National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Diabetes Translation
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