Radon Testing

aerial view of neighborhood homes during sunrise

Tracking radon data in a standard way over time can help us identify areas that need more testing to provide a more accurate estimate of radon exposure in that locale. Every home should be tested for radon so the individuals living there can see if their home has elevated radon levels and take steps to reduce it, if needed.

We Track That

The Tracking Network has radon testing data at the state and county level for most of the continental United States. The data on the Tracking Network come from some Tracking Program-funded states and several national radon testing laboratories.

Types of Data

Radon Test Data from Labs
This indicator provides radon testing data at the state and county level for most of the continental United States. National radon testing laboratories provide these data to the Tracking Network. Data available include number of buildings tested; number and percent of pre-mitigation* tests by radon level; median pre-mitigation* radon levels in tested buildings; and maximum pre-mitigation* radon levels in tested buildings.

Radon Test Data from States
This indicator provides radon testing data at the state and county level for some Tracking Program-funded states. Individual states provide these data to the Tracking Network. Available data include number of buildings tested; number and percent of pre-mitigation* tests by radon level; number and percent of post-mitigation* tests by radon level; median pre-mitigation* test levels of radon; and maximum pre-mitigation* levels of radon.

* All pre-mitigation data include those test results not designated as pre- or post-mitigation.

Data Highlight
Map of U.S. showing the Northeast and northern Midwest areas of the United States had the most buildings tested for radon

From 2008 – 2017, the Northeast and northern Midwest areas of the United States had the most buildings tested for radon. Explore more radon test data.

Data in Action

Analyzing, collecting, and disseminating radon testing information is the first step to developing policies and educational resources that can help prevent the harmful health effects related to elevated radon exposures. For example, tracking radon data in a standard way over time can help us identify areas with low testing that might have high levels of radon. These data can inform planning and implementation of public health actions for areas with the greatest need

Read these success stories to learn about the radon related work happening in our funded Tracking Programs.

Colorado | Kansas | New Hampshire |New Jersey | Oregon | Washington

Learn More

CDC/ATSDR

Other Sources

Tracking Resources

Explore Radon Testing Data
Data Explorer
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Quick Reports
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View data in simple charts

API
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Access machine-readable data

Page last reviewed: October 21, 2020