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Surveillance for Viral Hepatitis – United States, 2012

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Hepatitis A virus

PAGE
DESCRIPTION
Table 2.1Reported cases of acute hepatitis A, by state ― United States, 2008–2012
Table 2.2Clinical characteristics of reported cases of acute hepatitis A ― United States, 2012
Table 2.3Number and rate of deaths with hepatitis A listed as a cause of death, by demographic characteristics and year — United States, 2007–2011
Figure 2.1Reported number of acute hepatitis A cases — United States, 2000-2012
Figure 2.2Incidence of acute, hepatitis A, by age group — United States, 2000-2012
Figure 2.3Incidence of acute, hepatitis A, by sex — United States, 2000-2012
Figure 2.4Incidence of acute, hepatitis A, by race/ethnicity — United States, 2000-2012
Figure 2.5Availability of information on risk behaviors/exposures associated with acute hepatitis A — United States, 2012
Figure 2.6aAcute hepatitis A reports, by risk behavior — United States, 2012
Figure 2.6bAcute hepatitis A reports, by risk exposure — United States, 2012
 

Hepatitis A virus

Table 2.1 Reported cases of acute hepatitis A, by state ― United States, 2008–2012

State
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
Rate*(No.)Rate(No.)Rate(No.)Rate(No.)Rate(No.)
Alabama
0.3
(12)
0.3
(12)
0.2
(8)
0.2
(8)
0.4
(19)
Alaska
0.7
(5)
0.3
(2)
0.7
(5)
0.6
(4)
0.1
(1)
Arizona
1.8
(118)
1.0
(68)
1.0
(61)
1.2
(77)
1.4
(93)
Arkansas
0.3
(10)
0.4
(12)
0.1
(2)
0.1
(3)
0.3
(8)
California
1.2
(446)
0.7
(273)
0.6
(242)
0.5
(186)
0.5
(209)
Colorado
0.7
(36)
1.0
(52)
0.7
(36)
0.4
(21)
0.5
(28)
Connecticut
0.7
(26)
0.5
(18)
0.8
(29)
0.5
(18)
0.6
(23)
Delaware
0.8
(7)
0.5
(4)
0.8
(7)
0.2
(2)
1
(9)
District of Columbia
U
U
0.2
(1)
0.2
(1)
U
U
U
U
Florida
0.8
(146)
0.9
(171)
0.7
(139)
0.5
(87)
0.5
(87)
Georgia
0.6
(57)
0.5
(54)
0.4
(40)
0.3
(27)
0.5
(46)
Hawaii
1.6
(20)
0.8
(11)
0.6
(8)
0.6
(8)
0.4
(5)
Idaho
1.1
(17)
0.3
(5)
0.5
(8)
0.4
(6)
0.7
(11)
Illinois
0.9
(112)
1.0
(126)
0.4
(48)
0.6
(73)
0.5
(67)
Indiana
0.3
(20)
0.3
(17)
0.2
(12)
0.4
(24)
0.2
(11)
Iowa
3.6
(109)
1.3
(38)
0.4
(11)
0.3
(8)
0.2
(7)
Kansas
0.5
(15)
0.4
(12)
0.5
(14)
0.1
(4)
0.5
(15)
Kentucky
0.7
(30)
0.3
(12)
0.6
(26)
0.2
(10)
0.6
(25)
Louisiana
0.3
(12)
0.1
(6)
0.2
(11)
0.1
(5)
0.2
(7)
Maine
1.4
(18)
0.1
(1)
0.5
(7)
0.5
(6)
0.7
(9)
Maryland
0.8
(44)
0.8
(47)
0.4
(23)
0.4
(26)
0.5
(28)
Massachusetts
0.9
(58)
1.1
(71)
0.7
(48)
0.6
(39)
0.6
(40)
Michigan
1.2
(119)
0.7
(72)
0.7
(73)
0.7
(70)
1
(100)
Minnesota
0.9
(49)
0.6
(29)
0.7
(37)
0.5
(27)
0.5
(29)
Mississippi
0.2
(7)
0.3
(9)
0.1
(2)
0.2
(7)
0.4
(11)
Missouri
0.6
(35)
0.4
(21)
0.4
(21)
0.2
(13)
0.3
(20)
Montana
0.1
(1)
0.6
(6)
0.4
(4)
0.3
(3)
0.6
(6)
Nebraska
2.3
(41)
1.2
(21)
0.8
(14)
0.3
(5)
0.9
(16)
Nevada
0.5
(13)
0.6
(15)
0.5
(14)
0.2
(5)
0.4
(10)
New Hampshire
0.9
(12)
0.5
(7)
0.2
(2)
0
(0)
0.5
(6)
New Jersey
1.0
(86)
0.8
(71)
0.9
(76)
0.9
(79)
0.7
(60)
New Mexico
0.9
(18)
0.4
(8)
0.2
(5)
0.3
(7)
0.5
(10)
New York
0.9
(179)
0.7
(136)
0.8
(147)
0.6
(113)
0.6
(111)
North Carolina
0.7
(63)
0.4
(41)
0.5
(48)
0.3
(31)
0.3
(34)
North Dakota
0.3
(2)
0.3
(2)
0.6
(4)
0
(0)
0.3
(2)
Ohio
0.4
(51)
0.3
(36)
0.4
(47)
0.3
(39)
0.3
(36)
Oklahoma
0.4
(13)
0.2
(7)
0.2
(6)
0.3
(11)
0.3
(12)
Oregon
0.7
(25)
0.5
(19)
0.4
(17)
0.3
(11)
0.2
(9)
Pennsylvania
0.5
(68)
0.5
(68)
0.4
(53)
0.5
(60)
0.5
(62)
Rhode Island
1.1
(12)
0.9
(9)
0.9
(9)
0.8
(8)
0.3
(3)
South Carolina
0.4
(19)
1.4
(63)
0.6
(26)
0.2
(11)
0.1
(6)
South Dakota
0.5
(4)
0.4
(3)
0.1
(1)
0.2
(2)
0
0
Tennessee
0.5
(32)
0.2
(13)
0.2
(12)
0.4
(23)
0.4
(23)
Texas
1.1
(259)
0.7
(184)
0.6
(139)
0.5
(138)
0.5
(134)
Utah
0.5
(13)
0.3
(7)
0.4
(12)
0.3
(8)
0.1
(4)
Vermont
0.3
(2)
0.3
(2)
0
0
1.0
(6)
0.3
(2)
Virginia
0.7
(51)
0.5
(42)
0.6
(52)
0.4
(30)
0.6
(49)
Washington
0.8
(51)
0.6
(42)
0.3
(21)
0.5
(31)
0.4
(29)
West Virginia
0.3
(6)
0.3
(6)
0.8
(15)
0.4
(8)
0.4
(8)
Wisconsin
0.6
(33)
0.6
(33)
0.4
(23)
0.1
(8)
0.4
(21)
Wyoming
0.6
(3)
0.4
(2)
0.7
(4)
0.4
(2)
0.2
(1)
Total
0.9
(2,585)
0.6
(1,987)
0.5
(1,670)
0.4
(1,398)
0.5
(1,562)

*Rate per 100,000 population. †U=No data available for reporting.

Table 2.2 Clinical characteristics of reported cases of acute hepatitis A* ― United States, 2012

Clinical characteristic
Availability of valid data† for clinical characteristic
Cases with clinical characteristic§
No.
%
No.
%
Jaundice
1,018
65.2
652
64
Hospitalized for hepatitis A
1,022
65.4
468
45.8
Died from hepatitis A
938
60.1
6
0.6

*A total of 1,562 hepatitis A cases were reported during 2012.
†Case reports for which questions regarding clinical characteristics were answered with “yes” or “no.” Reports with any other response were excluded.
§Numbers and percentages represent only those case reports for which data regarding clinical characteristics were available; numbers likely are underestimates.

Table 2.3 Number and rate* of deaths with hepatitis A listed as a cause of death†, by demographic characteristic and year — United States, 2007–2011

Demographic characterisic
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
No.RateNo.RateNo.RateNo.RateNo.Rate
  Age Group
(years)
0–34 60.0000.0010.0030.0000.00
35–4430.0110.0010.0070.0210.00
45–54210.05230.05140.03250.06110.02
55–64200.06240.07220.06340.09160.04
65–74140.07120.06120.06100.05120.05
≥75210.11230.12320.17160.09290.15
 
RaceWhite§700.03630.02680.02    
Black140.04130.04130.04    
Non-White, non-Black**10.0170.0410.00    
 
  Race/
Ethnicity
White, non-
Hispanic
      650.03440.02
Black, non-
Hispanic
      150.04100.03
Hispanic      120.0360.02
Asian/Pacific
Islander
      20.0280.06
American
Indian/Alaskan
Native
      10.0510.04
 
SexMale610.04510.03500.03730.05370.02
Female240.01320.02320.02220.01320.02
 
Overall 850.03830.02820.02950.03690.02

* Rates for race, sex, and overall total are age-adjusted per 100,000 U.S. standard population.
†Cause of death is defined as the underlying cause of death or one of the multiple causes of death and is based on the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) codes B15 (hepatitis A).
§Included white, non-Hispanic and white Hispanic.
¶Included black, non-Hispanic and black Hispanic.
**Included all other racial/ethnic groups.

Source: CDC. National Vital Statistics System.

Figure 2.1. Reported number of acute hepatitis A cases — United States, 2000-2012 • The number of reported cases of acute hepatitis A declined by 88%, from 13,397 in 2000 to 1,562 in 2012.

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Figure 2.2. Incidence of acute, hepatitis A, by age group — United States, 2000-2012 • Rates of acute hepatitis A declined for all age groups from 2000-2012.

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Figure 2.3.  Incidence of acute, hepatitis A, by sex — United States, 2000-2012 • Since 2003, the rate of acute hepatitis A among males decreased and by 2012 was similar to that in females.

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Figure 2.4.   Incidence of acute, hepatitis A, by race/ethnicity — United States, 2000-2012 • From 2000-2007, rates of hepatitis A among Hispanics were generally higher than those of other racial/ethnic populations.

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Figure 2.5. Availability of information on risk behaviors/exposures associated with acute hepatitis A — United States, 2012 • Of the 1,562 case reports of acute hepatitis A received by CDC during 2012, a total of 568 (36%) cases did not include a response (i.e., a “yes” or “no” response to any of the questions about risk behaviors and exposures) to enable assessment of risk behaviors or exposures.

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Figure 2.6a. Acute hepatitis A reports, by risk behavior — United States, 2012. Figure 2.6a presents patient engagement in selected risk behaviors and exposures during the incubation period, 2–6 weeks prior to onset of symptoms:

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Slide 2.6b. Acute hepatitis A reports, by risk exposure — United States, 2012.  Acute, hepatitis A reports, by risk exposure — United States, 2012

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All seven figure slides in PowerPoint 2007 format [PPTX - 832KB]
 

Hepatitis B virus

PAGE
DESCRIPTION
Table 3.1Reported cases of acute hepatitis B, by state ― United States, 2008–2012
Table 3.2Clinical characteristics of reported cases of acute symptomatic hepatitis B ― United States, 2012
Table 3.3Number of laboratory-confirmed, chronic hepatitis B case reports — National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS), 2012
Table 3.4Number and rate of deaths with hepatitis B listed as a cause of death, by demographic characteristic and year – United States, 2007-2011
Figure 3.1Reported number of acute hepatitis B cases — United States, 2000-2012
Figure 3.2Incidence of acute hepatitis B, by age group — United States, 2000-2012
Figure 3.3Incidence of acute hepatitis B, by sex — United States, 2000-2012
Figure 3.4Incidence of acute hepatitis B, by race/ethnicity — United States, 2000-2012
Figure 3.5Availability of information on risk behaviors/exposures associated with acute hepatitis B — United States, 2012
Figure 3.6aAcute hepatitis B reports, by risk behavior — United States, 2012
Figure 3.6bAcute hepatitis B reports, by risk exposure — United States, 2012
 

Hepatitis B virus

Table 3.1 Reported cases of acute, hepatitis B, by state ― United States, 2008–2012

State
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
Rate*(No.)Rate(No.)Rate(No.)Rate(No.)Rate(No.)
Alabama
2.3
(109)
1.9
(89)
1.4
(68)
2.5
 
1.6
(79)
Alaska
1.5
(10)
0.6
(4)
0.7
(5)
0.4
(3)
0.1
(1)
Arizona
1.2
(80)
0.6
(42)
0.4
(26)
0.2
(14)
0.2
(14)
Arkansas
2.3
(67)
2.2
(65)
2.3
(66)
1.9
(57)
2.5
(74)
California
0.8
(303)
0.7
(258)
0.7
(252)
0.4
(157)
0.4
(136)
Colorado
0.7
(33)
0.5
(27)
0.9
(46)
0.4
(23)
0.5
(24)
Connecticut
0.9
(30)
0.5
(16)
0.6
(22)
0.5
(19)
0.4
(15)
Delaware
U†
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
1.2
(11)
District of Columbia
U
U
1.7
(10)
0.5
(3)
U
U
U
U
Florida
1.9
(344)
1.6
(299)
1.6
(297)
1.1
(213)
1.3
(247)
Georgia
1.9
(187)
1.5
(144)
1.7
(165)
1.4
(142)
1.1
(109)
Hawaii
0.5
(7)
0.5
(6)
0.4
(6)
0.4
(6)
0.4
(5)
Idaho
0.8
(12)
0.7
(11)
0.4
(6)
0.1
(2)
0.3
(5)
Illinois
1.4
(184)
0.9
(118)
1.1
(135)
0.7
(85)
0.7
(86)
Indiana
1.0
(67)
1.2
(74)
1.2
(75)
1.1
(70)
1.4
(90)
Iowa
0.8
(24)
1.2
(37)
0.5
(15)
0.5
(15)
0.4
(13)
Kansas
0.3
(9)
0.2
(6)
0.4
(11)
0.5
(15)
0.3
(9)
Kentucky
2.4
(101)
2.1
(90)
3.1
(136)
3.5
(151)
4.1
(180)
Louisiana
2.1
(94)
1.6
(73)
1.2
(55)
1.4
(62)
1
(44)
Maine
1.1
(15)
1.1
(15)
1.0
(13)
0.6
(8)
0.7
(9)
Maryland
1.5
(85)
1.3
(72)
1.2
(67)
1.1
(62)
0.9
(52)
Massachusetts
0.3
(21)
0.3
(17)
0.2
(13)
1.0
(67)
1.1
(75)
Michigan
1.5
(149)
1.3
(132)
1.2
(122)
0.9
(91)
0.8
(81)
Minnesota
0.5
(25)
0.7
(38)
0.4
(23)
0.4
(20)
0.3
(17)
Mississippi
1.7
(50)
1.1
(33)
1.1
(33)
1.9
(57)
2.6
(78)
Missouri
0.6
(38)
0.8
(47)
1.1
(67)
1.0
(60)
0.8
(48)
Montana
0.2
(2)
0.1
(1)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.2
(2)
Nebraska
0.5
(9)
1.2
(22)
0.7
(12)
0.7
(12)
0.5
(10)
Nevada
1.6
(43)
1.3
(34)
1.5
(41)
1.1
(29)
1
(28)
New Hampshire
0.6
(8)
0.5
(6)
0.4
(5)
0.2
(3)
0.3
(4)
New Jersey
1.4
(118)
1.1
(93)
0.9
(77)
0.8
(73)
0.8
(70)
New Mexico
0.6
(12)
0.4
(8)
0.2
(5)
0.5
(10)
0.1
(3)
New York
0.9
(173)
0.7
(129)
0.7
(139)
0.7
(134)
0.6
(113)
North Carolina
0.9
(81)
1.1
(104)
1.2
(113)
1.1
(109)
0.7
(73)
North Dakota
0.3
(2)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
0
Ohio
1.0
(118)
0.8
(88)
0.8
(95)
0.8
(90)
1.5
(178)
Oklahoma
3.5
(129)
3.3
(122)
3.1
(115)
2.6
(100)
2.1
(79)
Oregon
1.1
(41)
1.2
(44)
1.1
(42)
0.8
(32)
0.6
(25)
Pennsylvania
1.2
(157)
0.8
(106)
0.6
(72)
0.7
(84)
0.5
(63)
Rhode Island
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
South Carolina
1.6
(71)
1.2
(56)
1.3
(59)
0.8
(39)
0.8
(37)
South Dakota
0
(0)
0.5
(4)
0.2
(2)
0.2
(2)
0.2
(2)
Tennessee
2.4
(149)
2.2
(136)
2.4
(150)
3.0
(192)
3.7
(240)
Texas
2.3
(562)
1.7
(420)
1.6
(394)
0.8
(204)
0.7
(170)
Utah
0.5
(14)
0.2
(5)
0.3
(8)
0.4
(10)
0.5
(13)
Vermont
0.5
(3)
0
(0)
0.3
(2)
0
(0)
0.3
(2)
Virginia
1.7
(130)
1.4
(110)
1.2
(97)
1.0
(84)
1
(84)
Washington
0.9
(56)
0.7
(48)
0.7
(50)
0.5
(35)
0.5
(34)
West Virginia
4.6
(83)
4.6
(84)
4.7
(88)
6.1
(113)
7.6
(141)
Wisconsin
0.3
(18)
0.4
(24)
0.9
(54)
0.3
(17)
0.4
(22)
Wyoming
1.1
(6)
0.7
(4)
0.5
(3)
0
(0)
0
0
Total
1.3
(4,029)
1.1
(3,371)
1.1
(3,350)
0.9
(2,890)
0.9
(2,895)

*Rate per 100,000 population.
†U=No data available for reporting.

Table 3.2 Clinical characteristics of reported cases of acute, symptomatic hepatitis B* ― United States, 2012

Clinical characteristic
Availability of valid data† for clinical characteristic
Cases with clinical characteristic§
No.
%
No.
%
Jaundice
2,072
71.6
1,565
75.5
Hospitalized for hepatitis B
1,997
69.0
1,198
60.0
Died from hepatitis B
1,846
63.8
20
1.1

*A total of 2,895 hepatitis B cases were reported during 2012.
†Case reports for which questions regarding clinical characteristics were answered with “yes” or “no.” Reports with any other response were excluded.
§Numbers and percentages represent only those case reports for which data regarding clinical characteristics were available; numbers likely are underestimates.

Table 3.3 Number of laboratory-confirmed, chronic hepatitis B* case reports† — National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS), 2012

Jurisdiction^No. chronic hepatitis B
case reports submitted
Arizona 
892
Colorado 
458
Connecticut §
562
Delaware 
149
Illinois 
1,714
Kansas 
112
Louisiana 
603
Maine 
105
Massachusetts 
1,750
Michigan 
1,416
Montana 
25
New York §
1,611
New York City 
12,002
North Carolina 
888
Pennsylvania §
1,952
South Carolina 
463
South Dakota 
51
Vermont 
28
West Virginia 
163
Wyoming §
6
Total
24,950

* For case-definition, see
http://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/script/ConditionList.aspx?Type=0&Yr=2012
†Reports may not reflect unique cases.
§Includes probable and confirmed case reports.
^Jurisdictions that gave permission to report their chronic HBV cases

Table 3.4. Number and rate* of deaths with hepatitis B listed as a cause of death†, by demographic characteristic and year — United States, 2007–2011

Demographic characteristic
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
No.RateNo.RateNo.RateNo.RateNo.Rate
  Age Group
(years)
0–34620.04440.03390.03480.03410.03
35–441840.431540.361430.341420.351430.35
45–545321.215331.204691.054481.004210.94
55–645461.675231.555471.576101.676451.69
65–742661.372711.352541.222961.362851.27
≥752251.212631.402451.302481.342691.42
 
RaceWhite§1,0810.401,0930.409780.35    
Black3591.033270.923200.87    
Non-White, non-Black**3752.163682.053992.15    
 
  Race/
Ethnicity
White, non-
Hispanic
      8560.348320.32
Black, non-
Hispanic
      3560.943730.98
Hispanic      1360.431610.48
Asian/Pacific
Islander
      4212.954222.72
American
Indian/Alaskan
Native
      170.7390.38
 
SexMale1,3450.881,3150.851,2670.801,3160.811,3210.80
Female4700.284730.274300.244760.274830.26
 
Overall
1,8150.561,7880.541,6970.511,7920.521,8040.52

* Rates for race, sex, and overall total are age-adjusted per 100,000 U.S. standard population.
†Cause of death is defined as the underlying cause of death or one of the multiple causes of death and is based on the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) codes B16, B17.0, B18.0, and B18.1(hepatitis B).
§Included white, non-Hispanic and white Hispanic.
¶Included black, non-Hispanic and black Hispanic.
**Included all other racial/ethnic groups.

Source: CDC. National Vital Statistics System.

Figure 3.1. Reported number of acute hepatitis B cases — United States, 2000-2012 • The number of reported cases of acute hepatitis B decreased 64%, from 8,036 in 2000 to 2,895 in 2012.

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Figure 3.2.  Incidence of acute hepatitis B, by age group — United States, 2000-2012 • Declines in reported cases of hepatitis B were observed in all age groups.

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Figure 3.3. Incidence of acute hepatitis B, by sex — United States, 2000-2012 • While the incidence rate of acute hepatitis B remained higher for males than for females, the gap has narrowed from 2002-2012.

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Figure 3.4. Incidence of acute hepatitis B, by race/ethnicity — United States, 2000-2012 • The absolute number and rate of hepatitis B cases has declined generally for all race/ethnicity categories from 2000-2012.

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Figure 3.5. Availability of information on risk behaviors/exposures associated with acute hepatitis B — United States, 2012 • Of the 2,895 case reports of acute hepatitis B received by CDC during 2012, a total of 1,205 (42%) did not include a response (i.e., a “yes” or “no” response to any of the questions about risk behaviors and exposures) to enable assessment of risk behaviors or exposures.

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Figure 3.6a. Acute hepatitis B reports, by risk behavior — United States, 2012.  Figure 3.6a presents patient engagement in selected risk behaviors and exposures during the incubation period, 6 weeks to 6 months prior to onset of symptoms.

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Figure 3.6b. Acute hepatitis B reports, by risk exposure — United States, 2012.  Figure 3.6b presents patient engagement in selected risk behaviors and exposures during the incubation period, 6 weeks to 6 months prior to onset of symptoms.

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Hepatitis C virus

PAGE
DESCRIPTION
Table 4.1Reported cases of acute hepatitis C, by state ― United States, 2008–2012
Table 4.2Clinical characteristics of reported cases of acute hepatitis C ― United States, 2012
Table 4.3Number of laboratory confirmed, hepatitis C (past or present) case reports — National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS), 2012
Table 4.4Number and rate of deaths with hepatitis C listed as a cause of death, by demographic characteristic and year — United States, 2007–2011
Slide 4.1Reported number of acute hepatitis hepatitis C cases — United States, 2000-2012
Slide 4.2Incidence of acute hepatitis C, by age group — United States, 2000-2012
Slide 4.3Incidence of acute hepatitis C, by sex — United States, 2000-2012
Slide 4.4Incidence of acute hepatitis C, by race/ethnicity — United States, 2000-2012
Slide 4.5Availability of information on risk exposures/behaviors associated with acute hepatitis C — United States, 2012
Slide 4.6aAcute hepatitis C reports, by risk behavior — United States, 2012
Slide 4.6bAcute hepatitis C reports, by risk exposure — United States, 2012

Hepatitis C virus

Table 4.1 Reported cases of acute, hepatitis C, by state ― United States, 2008–2012

State
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
Rate*(No.)Rate(No.)Rate(No.)Rate(No.)Rate(No.)
Alabama
0.3
(13)
0.2
(10)
0.1
(7)
0.5
(23)
0.5
(24)
Alaska
U†
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
Arizona
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
Arkansas
0
(1)
0.1
(2)
0
(1)
0
(0)
0.2
(5)
California
0.1
(30)
0.1
(43)
0.1
(32)
0.1
(48)
0.2
(63)
Colorado
0.3
(14)
0.6
(28)
0.4
(20)
0.5
(28)
0.8
(42)
Connecticut
0.5
(19)
1.5
(53)
1.0
(37)
1.3
(47)
0.9
(34)
Delaware
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
District of Columbia
U
U
0.2
(1)
0.3
(2)
U
U
U
U
Florida
0.2
(32)
0.3
(53)
0.3
(56)
0.3
(64)
0.6
(107)
Georgia
0.2
(16)
0.3
(31)
0.3
(32)
0.5
(53)
0.8
(82)
Hawaii
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
Idaho
0.2
(3)
0.5
(7)
0.7
(11)
0.8
(12)
0.7
(11)
Illinois
0.1
(10)
0
(6)
0
(1)
0
(6)
0.2
(26)
Indiana
0.2
(13)
0.3
(22)
0.4
(27)
1.3
(84)
1.7
(110)
Iowa
0
(0)
0.4
(11)
0
0
0
(0)
0.1
(3)
Kansas
0
(1)
0
(1)
0.1
(2)
0.3
(8)
0.6
(16)
Kentucky
1.6
(68)
1.5
(64)
2.5
(109)
3.2
(142)
4.1
(178)
Louisiana
0.2
(9)
0.2
(9)
0.1
(4)
0.2
(7)
0.2
(11)
Maine
0.2
(3)
0.2
(2)
0.2
(2)
0.9
(12)
0.6
(8)
Maryland
0.4
(22)
0.4
(23)
0.4
(24)
0.6
(35)
0.7
(39)
Massachusetts
0.2
(13)
0.2
(10)
0.2
(13)
0.3
(23)
0.6
(37)
Michigan
1.3
(129)
0.4
(35)
0.5
(45)
0.3
(32)
0.8
(76)
Minnesota
0.4
(22)
0.3
(15)
0.3
(16)
0.3
(17)
0.6
(32)
Mississippi
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
Missouri
0
(2)
0
(0)
0.1
(6)
0.1
(8)
0.1
(4)
Montana
0.6
(6)
0.1
(1)
0.4
(4)
0.9
(9)
0.9
(9)
Nebraska
0.1
(2)
0.2
(3)
0.1
(2)
0.1
(2)
0.2
(3)
Nevada
0.8
(22)
0.2
(5)
0.3
(7)
0.4
(10)
0.4
(12)
New Hampshire
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
New Jersey
0.7
(61)
0.1
(7)
0.3
(28)
0.6
(53)
0.8
(71)
New Mexico
0.3
(5)
0.3
(6)
0.7
(14)
0.7
(14)
1
(21)
New York
0.2
(43)
0.3
(53)
0.3
(50)
0.3
(52)
0.5
(93)
North Carolina
0.5
(46)
0.3
(24)
0.4
(39)
0.6
(60)
0.6
(63)
North Dakota
0
(0)
0.3
(2)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
0
Ohio
0.3
(40)
0.2
(26)
0.1
(10)
0.1
(6)
0.1
(7)
Oklahoma
0.5
(20)
0.7
(27)
1.1
(41)
1.4
(53)
2.1
(80)
Oregon
0.6
(23)
0.5
(19)
0.5
(19)
0.5
(20)
0.9
(37)
Pennsylvania
0.2
(27)
0.3
(39)
0.2
(26)
0.3
(35)
0.5
(66)
Rhode Island
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
South Carolina
0.1
(4)
0
(1)
0
(1)
0
(1)
0
(1)
South Dakota
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
Tennessee
0.4
(28)
0.5
(33)
0.7
(46)
1.3
(83)
2
(129)
Texas
0.2
(59)
0.1
(36)
0.1
(35)
0.1
(37)
0.2
(44)
Utah
0.4
(12)
0.2
(6)
0.4
(10)
0.4
(10)
0.6
(17)
Vermont
0.2
(1)
0.2
(1)
0.3
(2)
1.0
(6)
1
(6)
Virginia
0.1
(8)
0.1
(10)
0.2
(13)
0.3
(25)
0.9
(76)
Washington
0.4
(25)
0.3
(22)
0.4
(25)
0.6
(41)
0.8
(54)
West Virginia
1.2
(22)
1.7
(31)
1.1
(21)
2.5
(46)
3
(55)
Wisconsin
0.1
(3)
0.1
(3)
0.2
(10)
0.3
(15)
0.5
(26)
Wyoming
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.4
(2)
U
U
Total
0.3
(877)
0.3
(781)
0.3
(850)
0.4
(1,229)
0.6
(1778)

*Rate per 100,000 population. †U=No data available for reporting.

Table 4.2 Clinical characteristics of reported cases of acute, hepatitis C* ― United States, 2012

Clinical characteristic
Availability of valid data† for clinical characteristic
Cases with clinical characteristic§
No.
%
No.
%
Jaundice
1,278
71.9
870
68.1
Hospitalized for hepatitis C
1,216
68.4
675
55.5
Died from hepatitis C
1,123
63.2
6
0.5

*A total of 1,778 hepatitis C cases were reported during 2012.
†Case reports for which questions regarding clinical characteristics were answered with “yes” or “no.” Reports with any other response were excluded.
§Numbers and percentages represent only those case reports for which data regarding clinical characteristics were available; numbers likely are underestimates.

Table 4.3 Number of laboratory confirmed, hepatitis C (past or present)* case reports† — National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS), 2012

JurisdictionNo. chronic hepatitis C
case reports submitted
Colorado
2,947
Connecticut
2,934
Illinois
7,673
Kansas
1,805
Louisiana
1,933
Maine
1,213
Massachusetts
7,686
Michigan
8,005
Montana
1,251
New York
6,791
New York City
7,598
Pennsylvania
9,747
South Carolina
3,672
South Dakota
390
Vermont
671
Wyoming
521
Total
64,837

* For case-definition, see
http://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/script/ConditionList.aspx?Type=0&Yr=2012
.
†Reports may not reflect unique cases.

Table 4.4. Number and rate* of deaths with hepatitis C listed as a cause of death†, by demographic characteristic and year — United States, 2007–2011

Demographic characteristic
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
No.RateNo.RateNo.RateNo.RateNo.Rate
  Age Group
(years)
0–341310.091240.091160.081170.081280.09
35–449992.328782.078281.997121.736961.71
45–545,93713.535,75812.985,46912.265,17111.495,07311.34
55–645,14515.725,96717.716,68319.217,43120.378,33021.89
65–741,6218.371,7098.491,8248.771,9018.752,1369.5
≥751,2736.851,3327.111,3337.011,2936.971,3577.18
 
RaceWhite§11,7984.3112,2614.3712,6824.43    
Black2,6867.592,8297.822,9087.80    
Non-White, non-Black**6223.596783.786633.61    
 
  Race/
Ethnicity
White, non-
Hispanic
 
      10,5754.03111964.19
Black, non-
Hispanic
      2,9817.7231677.89
Hispanic      2,3186.8325557.15
Asian/ Pacific
Islander
      4403.304553.14
American
Indian/ Alaskan
Native
      2489.9027510.61
 
SexMale10,5616.6411,1166.8211,5176.9111,7816.8112,6517.11
Female4,5452.654,6522.654,7362.654,8462.635,0702.7
 
Overall
15,1064.5815,7684.6616,2354.7016,6274.6517,7214.82

* Rates for race, sex, and overall total are age-adjusted per 100,000 U.S. standard population.
†Cause of death is defined as the underlying cause of death or one of the multiple causes of death and is based on the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) codes B17.1 and B18.2 (hepatitis C).
§Included white, non-Hispanic and white Hispanic.
¶Included black, non-Hispanic and black Hispanic.
**Included all other racial/ethnic groups.

Source: CDC. National Vital Statistics System.

Figure 4.1. Reported number of acute hepatitis hepatitis C cases — United States, 2000-2012  • The number of reported cases of acute hepatitis C declined rapidly until 2003 and remained steady until 2010.  However, from 2010 to 2011 there was a 45% increase in the number of reported hepatitis C (from 850 to 1,229 cases) and another 45% increase from 2011 to 2012 (from 1,229 to 1,778 cases), representing a 75% increase from 2010-2012.

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Figure 4.2. Incidence of acute hepatitis C, by age group — United States, 2000-2012 • Prior to 2002, incidence rates for acute hepatitis C decreased for all age groups (with the exception of the 0–19 year age group); rates remained fairly constant for all age groups from 2002 through 2010.

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Figure 4.3.  Incidence of acute hepatitis C, by sex — United States, 2000-2012 • Incidence rates of acute hepatitis C decreased dramatically for both males and females from 2000-2003 and remained fairly constant from 2004-2010.

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Figure 4.4. Incidence of acute hepatitis C, by race/ethnicity — United States, 2000-2012 • Rates for acute hepatitis C decreased for all racial/ethnic populations through 2003.

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Figure 4.5. Availability of information on risk exposures/behaviors associated with acute hepatitis C — United States, 2012 • Of the 1,778 case reports of acute hepatitis C received by CDC during 2012, 728 (40.9%) did not include a response (i.e., a “yes” or “no” response to any of the questions about risk behaviors and exposures) to enable assessment of risk behaviors or exposures.

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Figure 4.6a. Acute hepatitis C reports, by risk behavior — United States, 2012.  Figure 4.6a presents patient engagement in selected risk behaviors and exposures during the incubation period, 2 weeks to 6 months prior to onset of symptoms.

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Figure 4.6b. Acute hepatitis C reports, by risk exposure — United States, 2012.  Figure 4.6b presents patient engagement in selected exposures during the incubation period, 2 weeks to 6 months prior to onset of symptoms.

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