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Perinatal HIV Testing

Based on the CDC HIV testing recommendations of 2006, the CDC analyzed three components of perinatal HIV testing laws: whether the law requires HIV testing…

  1. Of pregnant women in their third trimester
  2. During labor and delivery when HIV status was undocumented
  3. Of the newborn if the mother’s HIV status remains unknown.

Salvant Valentine, S; Poulin , A. Consistency of State Statutes and Regulations With Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 2006 Perinatal HIV Testing Recommendations. Public Health Reports 2018, Vol. 133(5) 601-605.

The maps below show the type of Perinatal HIV testing laws for each.

This map depicts states with perinatal HIV testing laws that conduct newborn testing if the mother's HIV status remains unknown This map depicts states with perinatal HIV testing laws that conducts labor and delivery testing if HIV status is unknown This map depicts states with perinatal HIV testing laws that conducts third trimester testing only This map depicts states with perinatal HIV testing laws that conduct third trimester testing AND labor and delivery testing if the mother's HIV status is unknown This map depicts states with perinatal HIV testing laws that conduct both newborn and labor & delivery testing if the mother's HIV status remains unknown This map depicts states with perinatal HIV testing laws that conduct third trimester testing AND conduct both newborn and labor & delivery testing if the mother's HIV status remains unknown This map depicts states with no relevant perinatal HIV testing laws This map depicts states with perinatal HIV testing laws, but none that specifically cover third trimester, newborn or labor & deliver testing. This map depicts the different perinatal HIV testing laws across the United States

The information presented here does not constitute legal advice and does not represent the legal views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the Department of Health and Human Services, nor is it a comprehensive analysis of all legal provisions relevant to HIV. This information is subject to change and does not contain measures implemented by counties, cities, or other localities. Use of any provision herein should be contemplated only in conjunction with advice from legal counsel.

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