Watching Hands: Artists Respond to Keeping Well

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The result of an innovative partnership between Georgia-Pacific Professional and the David J. Sencer CDC Museum, the 2011-12 exhibition, Watching Hands: Artists Respond to Keeping Well, asks how art can communicate and interpret the practice of one of the most simple and effective disease prevention strategies: handwashing.

Six artists from across the United States responded to this challenge by creating new paintings, drawings, installations, and graphic communications that range from the humorous to the spiritual. The benefits of handwashing are universal, and communicating those benefits in a meaningful way will always be at the top of the public health agenda.

Click here to read the entire essay by Louise E. Shaw, exhibition curator.

Magic Handwashing

John Bankston
Magic Handwashing

Bubbles, Bubbles

Didi Dunphy
Bubbles, Bubbles

sink drain

Joe Peragine
Easiest, cheapest, needfull’st

Water Cure

Katherine L. Ross
Water Cure

Surface Tension

Laura Splan
Surface Tension

Washing Hands: The single most important means of preventing the spread of infection.

James Victore
Washing Hands: The single most important means of preventing the spread of infection.

Page last reviewed: April 7, 2020