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State Public Health Actions to Prevent and Control Diabetes, Heart Disease, Obesity and Associated Risk Factors, and Promote School Health

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A flyer describes the “State Public Health Actions” program and the 4 domains of chronic disease prevention. The first part of the flyer describes the problems, the public health goals to address the problem, and the goals of the State Public Health Actions program:
Problems: one in 2 adults has at least one chronic condition. Every year 70% of American deaths are caused by chronic diseases. Chronic diseases account for 84% of US health care costs. Goal of the State Public Health Actions program: healthier people living in healthier communities; improved prevention and control of diabetes, heart disease, and obesity; and promotion of health in schools.

State Public Health Actions consists of 4 distinct CDC chronic disease prevention programs working together to strengthen state actions to address health risk behaviors, environments, and systems associated with diabetes, heart disease, obesity, and school health:
Domain 1, Epidemiology and Surveillance: Monitor trends, track progress, provide information for action.
Domain 2, Environmental Approaches: Improve communities to support healthy choices and behaviors.
Domain 3, Health Care Systems Interventions: Improve care to facilitate prevention, early diagnosis, and quality management of chronic disease.
Domain 4, Community–Clinical Links: Support self-management of chronic conditions to improve quality of life.
The second part of the flyer describes how the program uses the 4 domains to support state programs in preventing and controlling chronic disease:
Why State Public Health Actions and the 4 domains: 1) They promote efficiency through better coordination and integration of programs within states and improve program impact. 2) The strategies used to address risk factors and improve health are complementary, and often similar, across programs.
How does the State Public Health Actions program work across the 4 domains: 1) Work groups and regional teams are formed for coordination across functions and geographical areas. 2) Training and technical assistance is provided for cross-cutting and categorical needs.
What does coordination look like: 1) Information and resource sharing occur across work groups and regional teams and among the 50 states and the District of Columbia. 2) Communities of practice, networking, access to national partner resources, and national evaluation are also coordinated.
Benefits and synergies: Improved partnerships, coordination, and health status through State Public Health Actions:
State health departments share information and resources with other states and local partners and work with them to implement strategies.
CDC work groups and regional teams coordinate technical assistance and resources and connect states and partners doing similar work.
National, state, and local partners provide cross-cutting expertise, training, and capacity-building resources for grantees.

Figure 1.
Overview of the State Public Health Actions to Prevent and Control Diabetes, Heart Disease, Obesity and Associated Risk Factors, and Promote School Health program (State Public Health Actions) for state health departments and the 4 domains of chronic disease prevention. The 4 domains provide focus for State Public Health Actions to address chronic disease at the individual level by promoting health care interventions and at the population level by developing policies and creating environments that promote health.

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A map shows the 50 US states and the District of Columbia, coded to indicate which states received basic funding only and which received basic plus enhanced funding. The following 32 states received both basic and enhanced funding: Arkansas, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Idaho, Iowa, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Carolina, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin. All other states and the District of Columbia received basic funding.

Figure 2. A map illustrating the level of award states received for the State Public Health Actions cooperative agreement.

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The opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions.

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