Digital Toolkit for Clinicians

Digital Toolkit clinicians

This toolkit contains resources from CDC’s Let’s Stop HIV Together campaign to support you, your colleagues, and partners in communicating about HIV screening, treatment, and prevention. Digital networking is a key avenue for health care providers and provider associations to engage with their peers and association members about best practices for HIV screening, treatment, and prevention.

WHO should use this Toolkit?

This Toolkit is designed for health care providers and provider associations.

WHAT is this Toolkit about?

This Toolkit serves as a ready to use resource for providers and provider associations looking to apply digital strategies to help increase HIV screening, promote prevention strategies for patients at risk, and improve patient care through treatment and viral suppression.

HOW should I use this Toolkit?

Review and use the guidance, social media content, multimedia and digital products, and other tools described below to initiate or enhance your digital HIV outreach.

Access Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) print and digital HIV screening, treatment, and prevention materials to order or download by visiting CDC’s HIV Nexus, a new, comprehensive website for clinicians. HIV Nexus is an enhanced site that provides the latest scientific evidence, guidelines, and resources on:

  • HIV Screening: Routinely screening patients for HIV.
  • Preventing New HIV Infections: Protecting people at risk for HIV by prescribing pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), promoting condom use, and syringe service programs.
  • HIV Treatment & Care: Linking people with HIV to treatment and care.
  • HIV Treatment as Prevention: Talking to patients with HIV about the benefits of getting and keeping an undetectable viral load to stay healthy and stop HIV transmission.
  • Transgender Health: Resources for specialized care across the HIV prevention and care continuum.

An estimated 74%–88% of U.S. physicians use social media [i], [ii] to exchange clinical information and best practices. No matter if you’re just getting started or have a well-established social media presence, providers and associations can use the strategies and sample posts below to join the national conversation about screening for, preventing, and treating HIV.

Follow CDC on social media to exchange ideas and stay informed about new provider resources.

Include CDC Hashtags in your posts about HIV screening, treatment, and prevention.

  • HIV screening: #ScreenforHIV
  • PrEP: #PrescribeHIVPrevention
  • Treatment, care, and prevention for people with HIV: #HIVCareCDC
  • Transgender HIV care: #CDCTransHealth
  • HIV Nexus: #HIVnexus
  • Ending the HIV Epidemic: #EndHIVEpidemic

Use these Sample Social Media Posts and Graphics to get started sharing important information about HIV screening, treatment, and prevention. All graphics are royalty-free and models have consented to participate.

#ScreenForHIV

Approximately 1 in 7 people with HIV don’t know they have it. Clinicians can help reduce missed opportunities to #ScreenForHIV and link patients to care and treatment using CDC’s #HIVnexus resources. www.cdc.gov/hiv/clinicians/screening

Approximately 1 in 7 people with HIV don’t know they have it. Ending the HIV epidemic starts with ensuring every patient is tested for HIV, no matter their gender, sexual orientation, age, or ethnicity. Health care providers, explore free CDC resources to help #ScreenForHIV in your practice: www.cdc.gov/hiv/clinicians/screening

Routine HIV Screening. Every patient. #ScreenForHIV

Celia J. Maxwell, M.D., FACP, FIDSA

#PrescribeHIVPrevention

Providers: PrEP is ~99% effective at preventing sexual transmission of HIV when taken daily as prescribed. CDC’s #HIVnexus offers resources to help #PrescribeHIVPrevention in your practice and keep patients healthy. www.cdc.gov/hiv/clinicians/prevention

#PrEP has been shown to reduce the risk of getting HIV from sex by about 99% when taken daily. I prescribe PrEP in my practice to help keep patients healthy, and I support CDC’s #PrescribeHIVPrevention initiative. www.cdc.gov/hiv/clinicians/prevention

PrEP is ~99 percent effective at preventing sexual transmission of HIV when taken daily as prescribed.

R. Philip J. Peters, MD

#HIVCareCDC

Providers: PrEP is ~99% effective at preventing sexual transmission of HIV when taken daily as prescribed. CDC’s #HIVnexus offers resources to help #PrescribeHIVPrevention in your practice and keep patients healthy. www.cdc.gov/hiv/clinicians/prevention

#PrEP has been shown to reduce the risk of getting HIV from sex by about 99% when taken daily. I prescribe PrEP in my practice to help keep patients healthy, and I support CDC’s #PrescribeHIVPrevention initiative. www.cdc.gov/hiv/clinicians/prevention

Talking to patients with HIV makes a difference.

Virginia A. Caine, MD

#CDCTransHealth

Nearly two thirds of transgender people report having never been tested for HIV. CDC’s Transforming Health initiative has tools to help providers navigate HIV testing and care with patients of all gender identities. #CDCTransHealth www.cdc.gov/hiv/clinicians/transforming-health

The percentage of transgender people who received a new HIV diagnosis in 2017 was 3 times the national average. I deliver patient-centered HIV care to patients of all gender identities to help close this gap and support CDC’s Transforming Health initiative. #CDCTransHealth www.cdc.gov/hiv/clinicians/transforming-health

Break down barriers to transform HIV testing and care. #CDCTransHealth

Dr. Madeline Deutsch, MD, MPH

#HIVNEXUS

Clinicians, have you heard? HIV Nexus is a comprehensive website from CDC with the latest scientific evidence, guidelines, and resources for your practice and patients.  www.cdc.gov/HIVNexus

HIV NEXUS CDC Resources for Clinicians
#EndHIVEpidemic

Health care providers are key to Ending the HIV Epidemic. CDC’s #HIVNexus has free resources to help providers with HIV screening, treatment, and prevention. #EndHIVEpidemic www.cdc.gov/HIVNexus

The time is now. Ending the HIV epidemic

Show your support for Let’s Stop HIV Together using the customized CDC Facebook profile picture frame around national HIV observances.

#HIVCareCDC frame

#HIVCareCDC frame example

Engage in Conversations around national HIV observances using the following sample posts and visit our National HIV Awareness Days page for more information about annual partners and themes.

February 7: National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

February 7: National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

Clinicians: February 7 is National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. CDC’s #HIVNexus offers free resources on treatment as prevention to reduce #HIV transmission among African Americans. #HIVCareCDC #NBHAAD www.cdc.gov/HIVNexus

March 20: National Native HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

March 20: National Native HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

With HIV screening, treatment, and prevention, clinicians can reduce HIV transmission and improve medical outcomes for women in their practice. CDC’s #HIVNexus offers free resources to help. #NWGHAAD www.cdc.gov/HIVNexus

March 10: National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

March 10: National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

With HIV screening, treatment, and prevention, clinicians can reduce HIV transmission and improve medical outcomes for women in their practice. CDC’s #HIVNexus offers free resources to help. #NWGHAAD www.cdc.gov/HIVNexus

April 10 is National Youth HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

April 10: National Youth HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

Clinicians: Today is National Youth HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, a day to address the impact of HIV on young people. When we reduce HIV stigma and promote prevention, testing, and treatment among youth, we can help #StopHIVTogether. www.cdc.gov/HIVNexus

April 18: National Transgender HIV Testing Day

April 18: National Transgender HIV Testing Day

Providers: The percentage of transgender people who received an HIV diagnosis in 2017 was 3 times the national average. CDC’s #HIVNexus has free resources to help routinely test and link transgender and non-binary people to HIV care. #NTHTD #CDCTransHealth www.cdc.gov/TransformingHealth

May 19: National Asian and Pacific Islander HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

May 19: National Asian and Pacific Islander HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

Clinicians: Today is National Asian and Pacific Islander HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. #NAPIHAAD www.cdc.gov/HIVNexus

June 27: National HIV Testing Day

June 27: National HIV Testing Day

Providers: June 27 is National HIV Testing Day, and CDC’s #HIVNexus offers free resources to help #ScreenforHIV with every patient! #NHTD www.cdc.gov/hiv/clinicians/screening

September 18: National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day

September 18: National HIV/AIDS & Aging Awareness Day

Clinicians: Today is National HIV/AIDS & Aging Awareness Day. With advanced treatment options, people with HIV are living longer, healthier lives. But older adults still face stigma and challenges in HIV prevention, care, and treatment. #NHAAD www.cdc.gov/HIVNexus

October 15: National Latinx AIDS Awareness Day

October 15: National Latinx AIDS Awareness Day

Clinicians: Today is National HIV/AIDS & Aging Awareness Day. With advanced treatment options, people with HIV are living longer, healthier lives. But older adults still face stigma and challenges in HIV prevention, care, and treatment. #NHAAD www.cdc.gov/HIVNexus

December 1: World AIDS Day

December 1: World AIDS Day

Health care providers are on the frontlines for ending the HIV epidemic. This #WorldAIDSDay, explore CDC’s #HIVNexus free resources for HIV screening, treatment, and prevention. www.cdc.gov/HIVNexus

Multimedia and Digital Products

Enhance your digital outreach using the CDC-developed multimedia and digital products described below for your website, email correspondence, or social media posts.

Download and share the following infographics via social media and email or post them on your website.

HIV Prevention and Treatment is a Continuum of Care

Clinician Actions to Stop HIV Together

Ending the HIV Epidemic is Possible. 4 Actions for Health Care Providers

Ending the HIV Epidemic Takes all of Us

Share the videos below via social media and email or post them on your website.

Health care providers, fewer than 40 percent of U.S. adults were tested for HIV in 2016-2017

Prescribe HIV Prevention

3 clinician tips to provide patient-centered HIV care for transgender people

Health care providers, how can you help end the HIV epidemic?

Place the following web badges on your website to help direct others to this toolkit and to CDC’s HIV screening, treatment, and prevention resources.

Enhance your digital outreach using the CDC-developed multimedia and digital products described below for your website, email correspondence, or social media posts.

Email Message 1: Make HIV Screening a Part of Routine Care. HIV Screening is for Every Patient.

Did you know that approximately 1 in 7 people in the United States do not know they had HIV?

HIV crosses all boundaries—sexual orientation, gender, age, and ethnicity. That’s why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends HIV screening for all patients ages 13–64, as a part of routine health care. Patients who may be at ongoing risk for HIV should be screened at least annually. HIV screening is covered under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) for everyone ages 15 to 65 at least once and more frequently for those at risk.

Early diagnosis is the first step to linking people to treatment and reducing new HIV infections. Make HIV screening a part of routine care and help end the HIV epidemic. Visit HIV Nexus to learn more: www.cdc.gov/HIVNexus.

Email Message 2: Prevent New HIV Infections. Share the Power of PrEP

Studies have shown that pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) reduces the risk of getting HIV from sex by about 99% when taken as prescribed. More than 1 million people in the United States could benefit from PrEP. Of those, less than 25% are currently using this medication.

Did you know that as a licensed prescriber, you can prescribe PrEP? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that health care providers prescribe PrEP to prevent new HIV infections and improve health outcomes for patients at risk for HIV. Currently, two medications are approved for PrEP: Truvada and Descovy—only Truvada is approved for people at risk of getting HIV through vaginal or anal sex.* PrEP is safe for pregnant and breastfeeding women and can be taken by women who have partners with HIV and wish to conceive without risk of HIV transmission to themselves or the child. PrEP should be a key tool in your patient’s HIV prevention plan, supported by a discussion about adherence, condom use, and other risk-reduction methods.

Prescribe HIV Prevention in your practice to help keep your patients healthy. Share the power of PrEP. Visit HIV Nexus to learn more: www.cdc.gov/HIVNexus.

*Note: Descovy is not approved for people at risk of getting HIV through receptive vaginal sex.

Email Message 3: Talk to Your Patients About HIV Treatment as Prevention. It Makes a Difference.

Did you know that people with HIV who take antiretroviral therapy (ART) as prescribed and get and keep an undetectable viral load can stay healthy and have effectively no risk of transmitting HIV to their sexual partners?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is committed to reducing new HIV infections by 90% in 10 years. Talking to your patients about treatment as prevention and the benefits of viral suppression is one of the best things you can do for your patients’ health and to help stop HIV transmission. At every office visit, aim to engage your patients in brief conversations to:

  • Discuss the prevention steps they are taking.
  • Identify barriers to ART adherence and regular ongoing care.
  • Link them to social support services to help improve their engagement in and adherence to HIV care.

Each office visit is an opportunity to build trust and retain patients in care. Start the conversation about treatment as prevention today. Visit HIV Nexus to learn more: www.cdc.gov/HIVNexus.

Email Message 4: Visit HIV Nexus to Access Tools for Your Practice and Patients.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed HIV Nexus, a comprehensive website that offers clinicians the latest scientific evidence, guidelines, and resources on:

  • Routinely screening patients for HIV.
  • Protecting people at risk for HIV by prescribing pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP).
  • Linking people with HIV to treatment and care.
  • Talking to patients with HIV about the benefits of getting and keeping an undetectable viral load to stay healthy and stop HIV transmission.

As a health care provider, you are frontline for preventing new HIV infections and improving health outcomes for people with HIV. Visit HIV Nexus to access resources and tools to help end the HIV epidemic: www.cdc.gov/HIVNexus.

Dear Colleague Email

Subject line:

CDC Launches Free Let’s Stop HIV Together Digital Toolkit for Clinicians

Header:

CDC Launches Free Let’s Stop HIV Together Digital Toolkit for Clinicians

Dear Colleague,

As health care providers, we are the frontline for preventing new HIV infections and improving health outcomes for people with HIV. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently launched HIV Nexus, a comprehensive website that offers clinicians the latest scientific evidence, guidelines, and resources across the HIV continuum of care. HIV Nexus also provides digital resources, like the Let’s Stop HIV Together Digital Toolkit for Clinicians, to help health care providers engage with peers about best practices for HIV screening, treatment, and prevention.

The Let’s Stop HIV Together Toolkit is a ready to use resource for health care providers and partners who want to harness the power of social sharing and web-based information to help increase HIV screening and prevention and improve HIV treatment and care. The Toolkit offers up-to-date guidance, social media content, multimedia and digital products, and other tools to help initiate or enhance your digital HIV outreach.

Health care providers like you and me play a key role in ending the HIV epidemic. Join the conversation today using free resources from CDC: [Toolkit Link]

Sincerely,

[insert signature block]

When using social media to reach colleagues, stakeholders, and/or patients, keep the following best practices in mind for clear communication, visuals, and post structure.

Best Practices

Clear Communication

  • Plain language. Using plain language helps both colleagues and patients understand your message.
  • Simplicity. Simplifying messages allows readers to scan social media content quickly.
  • Conciseness. Posts with a lower character count (50–100 characters) tend to see more engagement, including likes, shares, and retweets.
  • Active voice. Instead of passive voice, try clear, energizing messages to help motivate your audience.
  • Understandable Data. Expressing numbers in common terms and adding context help readers more quickly interpret the message without having to do calculations.

Visuals

  • Photos. Images help make content more relatable and engaging. Social media posts with images see more than double the engagement (e.g., likes, comments, and clicks) as text-only content.
  • Infographics, charts, and diagrams are effective and popular ways to share research and express data quickly.
  • Visual cues. Using visual cues (e.g., shapes, color, boldface, lines, font, headings) helps draw attention to the most important parts of the message.
  • Short videos. Adding short videos engages more readers. Audiences are more likely to watch videos than to read text. All videos in this toolkit are royalty-free for your use.

Messaging

  • Calls to action. Including calls to action will tell the reader exactly what they should do. The call to action can promote a specific behavior, request the user to share the message, or direct the user to an external link. For example, “discover new materials for your practice” or “order patient brochures.”
  • Ask for engagement. Direct, real-time interaction is a powerful element of social media engagement. Ask readers to leave comments, retweet, and share your post content with others in their networks.

Structure

  • URL Links. Providing a direct link to your website helps interested readers get more information and/or download materials. URL shortening services, like lyexternal iconexternal icon, can help avoid long and distracting links.
  • Hashtags help to categorize content so that your audience can quickly find relevant information. Using one or two relevant hashtags can boost engagement, particularly for national observances or holidays. However, engagement declines with the use of three or more hashtags per post.
  • Tagging. The power of social media is in leveraging networks. Tagging or referencing relevant partners or influencer accounts at the beginning or end of your message can increase the potential reach.

For additional information and resources on diagnosing, preventing, and treating HIV, explore CDC’s HIV Nexus website.

Please share these resources with your professional networks and colleagues to help CDC spread the word about the importance of HIV screening, treatment, and prevention! Please use the hashtag #HIVNexus in your social media posts so clinicians can follow the conversation online.

i Arnold, M. (2019, December). Turning the page on the decade when medical information went multichannel. DRG Perspectives. https://decisionresourcesgroup.com/blog/turning-page-decade-medical-information-went-multichannel/external icon

ii Bosslet GT, Torke AM, Hickman SE, Terry CL, Helft PR. The patient–doctor relationship and online social networks: results of a national survey. J Gen Intern Med. 2011;26(10):1168-1174. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-011-1761-2external icon.

iii Surani Z, Hirani R, Elias A, et al. Social media usage among health care providers. BMC Res Notes. 2017;10;654. DOI:10.1186/s13104-017-2993-y.