One Health in Action

One Health Collaboration in Uzbekistan: Addressing Zoonotic Diseases through Prioritization and Planning
Experts from participating ministries work together to identify criteria used to define the national importance of zoonotic diseases during the OHZDP  Workshop. Photo credit: Tory Seffren

Uzbekistan, a country in Central Asia and part of the former Soviet Union, faces challenges in controlling and preventing zoonotic diseases, which can spread between people and animals. Health risks like brucellosis, which occurs in high numbers in both people and livestock in the region, exist due to inadequate health and veterinary systems, and limited laboratory and surveillance system capacities in the country. The government of Uzbekistan recognizes the threat posed by zoonotic diseases (as the country sees major economic growth in livestock production) and is working to improve the country’s capacity to prevent, control, detect, and treat them.

Working Together for One Health
A man with his dog

One Health is the idea that the health of people is connected to the health of animals and our shared environment. Learn why One Health is important and how, by working together, we can achieve the best health for everyone.

Influenza and Zoonoses Education among Youth in Agriculture
Cover art for Influenza and Zoonoses Education among Youth in Agriculture

In 2011, when an outbreak of variant virus infections in people was linked to exposure to pigs at agricultural fairs, public health officials quickly recognized the need to support states in using a One Health approach to respond effectively to novel influenza A and other zoonotic disease outbreaks in rural areas.

Crowdsourcing to Report and Respond to Zoonotic Diseases
Local farmers receive training on how to use the mobile app.

In Thailand, farmers, local health volunteers, and human and animal health officers are using mobile technology to report zoonotic diseases that pose a serious threat to the health of people and animals.

Understanding Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in Kazakhstan
Understanding Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in Kazakhstan

Between 2000 and 2013, the Zhambyl region of Kazakhstan reported the second highest number of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) illnesses in people, out of all the regions in the country. Although outbreaks of CCHF happen regularly in Kazakhstan, public health officials wanted to understand why this particular region had a higher number of cases.

The Story of the Rift Valley Fever Virus Vaccine Preventing Disease in Humans and Livestock
Person wearing protective equipment examining a sheep

In late 1997, a disease outbreak began in East Africa. In three months, 90,000 people became sick and almost 500 people died. Many animals in the region also died, causing economic difficulties for the people who relied on these animals for milk, meat, and as a trading commodity.

Poisoned Sea Otters in California
Sea Otter swimming on his back in water

California scientists and veterinarians found themselves in the middle of a mystery in 2007. Over the span of a year, 11 dead or dying sea otters had been found around Monterey Bay, California.

Lead Poisoning Investigation in Northern Nigeria
group of children sitting outside

In early 2010, ducks began to disappear in northern Nigeria. People would later report that they noticed there were fewer ducks in the area, but no one thought it was important at the time.
However, a few months later in May 2010, public health officials learned that hundreds of children had become sick in northern Nigeria