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Videos

Cara

Cara with her counselor

Cara: My Breast Cancer Journey

Cara, age 30, discusses how her family history of breast cancer and Ashkenazi Jewish heritage inspired her proactive approach to her breast health, allowing her to find her breast cancer early when she was diagnosed at age 25.

Cara

Cara: Making Decisions with a Genetic Counselor

Cara’s father encouraged her to get genetic counseling because of her family history of cancer and Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. Cara explains how a genetic counselor helped her understand her personal risk for breast cancer.

Cara

Cara’s Bring Your Brave Ad

When Cara was three years old, her mom passed away from breast cancer at the age of 42. Cara encourages young women with a family history of cancer and Ashkenazi Jewish heritage to learn their risk for breast cancer.

Carletta

Carletta swimming

Carletta: My Own Best Advocate

Carletta, age 44, talks about how knowing her family history of breast cancer made it easier for her to be proactive about talking to her doctor when she noticed changes in her body. Carletta was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 41, and she finished her first triathlon one year after her first chemotherapy treatment.

Carletta bicycling

Carletta: Motivated by Breast Cancer

Carletta was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 41. Now cancer-free, she is motivated by her ability to do the things that she couldn’t do during treatment. She finished her first triathlon one year after her first round of chemotherapy.

Carletta playing tennis

Carletta’s Bring Your Brave Ad

Carletta never met her grandmother, who died from breast cancer at the age of 44. Carletta’s family history inspired her to understand her own risk. She encourages young women with a family history of cancer to learn their risk for breast cancer.

Charity

There Isn’t Just One Face to Breast Cancer

There Isn’t Just One Face to Breast Cancer

When Charity was diagnosed with breast cancer at 27, she faced a series of difficult decisions. Learn what steps she took to be proactive about her health and her cancer risk – and what she wants young women to know about their health.

No Matter Your Age, Know Your Breast Cancer Risk

No Matter Your Age, Know Your Breast Cancer Risk

At age 27 Charity was diagnosed with breast cancer. Find out how she took a proactive approach to her health – and what she wants other young women to know about their breast cancer risks.

Jackie

Jackie

Jackie: Taking Action for My Daughter

Jackie, age 38, has a paternal family history of breast and ovarian cancer and a BRCA gene mutation. She shares how understanding her risk enabled her to take action to reduce her risk for breast and ovarian cancer, and create a roadmap for a bright future for her and her 4-year-old daughter.

Jackie with her daughter

Jackie: Testing for a BRCA Gene Mutation

Jackie saw many relatives on her father’s side of the family get diagnosed with and die from breast or ovarian cancer. Because of her family history, her doctor recommended she receive genetic counseling. Jackie explains her experience with genetic counseling and testing.

Jackie

Jackie’s Bring Your Brave Ad

Jackie took steps to learn about her risk for breast and ovarian cancer because of her family history.

Lisa

Lisa staring at a photograph of her family.

Lisa: Start the Conversation About Family History of Breast Cancer

Lisa talks about how she realized that having family members with pre-menopausal breast and ovarian cancer meant that she has a higher risk of getting cancer before she turned 45. She talks about how this affected her as a young mother and why she takes steps to manage her risk. Lisa provides a tip for talking with family members about their history of cancer.

Lisa reading a journal

Lisa: Empower Yourself by Learning Your Family’s Cancer History

Lisa’s family history of breast and ovarian cancer puts her at higher risk for getting cancer in the future. Watch this video to learn how she’s used this information to empower herself.

Lisa talking about her experience

Lisa: My Experience with BRCA Counseling and Testing

Lisa, age 41, talks about how her family history led her to get genetic counseling and testing for BRCA gene mutations. She describes the genetic testing experience, and how it helped her understand her family history and manage her risk for breast cancer.

Lisa

Lisa: Be Your Own Health Advocate

Lisa, age 41, talks about her decision to get genetic counseling and testing to find out if she had a BRCA gene mutation, and how the experience empowered her to understand her options and be her own best health advocate.

Marleah

Marleah

Marleah: Inspired by My Mom

When Marleah was 8 years old, she watched her mother, then 38, go through treatment for breast cancer. Her mother’s experience inspired her to understand and her own risk, and she learned that she has a BRCA2 gene mutation like her mom and aunt. To manage her risk, Marleah currently undergoes surveillance.

Marleah smiling

Marleah: Understanding My Risk to Help Others

Marleah’s family history of breast cancer was her motivation for pursuing a career where she can be an advocate for herself and others at high risk. At 27, Marleah explains that understanding her risk has been an emotional journey, but also a good journey.

Marleah climbing

Marleah’s Bring Your Brave Ad

Marleah took steps to understand her risk for breast cancer because of her family history. She encourages young women with a family history of cancer to learn their personal risk.

From a Genetic Counselor

Dr. Joyce Turner with a young woman

The Role of Family History in Breast Cancer

Genetic counselor Joyce Turner, MSC, CGC, explains how family history of breast cancer may indicate inherited changes in genes that increase your personal risk for breast cancer. She offers action steps you can take if you have concerns about your personal risk of breast cancer.

Young woman entering a genetic counseling clinic

The Role of Family History in Breast Cancer (30-second)

Genetic counselor Joyce Turner, MSC, CGC, explains that if you have a family history of breast cancer, it is important to speak with a genetic counselor or a health professional who can talk to you about your personal risk of developing breast cancer.

Dr. Joyce Turner

BRCA Genes and Breast Cancer

Genetic counselor Joyce Turner, MSC, CGC, provides an overview of BRCA genes and their relationship to breast and ovarian cancer. She explains how each of us inherits BRCA genes from our parents, the role of those genes and what happens if we inherit a gene mutation. She also talks about how genetic counseling and testing can give a woman information she can use to make decisions about her health.

Laboratory technician working on samples to detect BRCA gene mutations.

What Is a BRCA Gene Mutation?

In this video, genetic counselor Joyce Turner, MSC, CGC, explains what the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are and how a mutation in either gene can lead to cancer. She also discusses how genetic counseling and testing can help women make informed decisions about their health.

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