Fact Sheet

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What You Need to Know About Your Medicine for Latent Tuberculosis (TB) Infection

ISONIAZID and RIFAPENTINE
You have been given medicine to treat your latent TB infection. You do not have TB disease and cannot spread TB to others. This medicine will help you PREVENT getting TB disease.

Remember to Keep Your Weekly Visits:

  • The health care worker helps you to remember to take your medicines.
  • You will complete your treatment as soon as possible.
  • The health care worker will make sure you are not having problems with the medicines.
  • During your weekly meetings, this person can answer your questions.
  • You can also talk about any concerns you have.

While on this Medicine:

  • Tell your doctor or nurse if you have questions or concerns with the medicine.
  • Go to weekly visits.
  • Discuss any alcohol use with your doctor. Alcohol use may cause side effects.
  • Tell your doctor about all other medicines you are taking.
  • Be sure to tell your other doctors that you are being treated for latent TB infection.
  • Some people find that the medicine affects them less when taken with food.

Latent TB Infection Medicine Schedule:

(Providers: Indicate the appropriate schedule, days and number of pills)

Schedule 
Medicine Schedule Day Number of Pills Per Day Length
of time
Isoniazid & Rifampin Once weekly M   T   W   Th   F   S   Sun 3 months (12 weeks)

Your doctor may have you take vitamin B6 with your medicine.

NOTES
Name of my doctor:
Name of my clinic:
Telephone number of my clinic:

Watch for Possible Symptoms:

STOP AND call your TB doctor or nurse right away if you have any of the problems below:

  • Less appetite, or no appetite for food
  • An upset stomach or stomach cramps
  • Fever
  • Head or body aches
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Cola-colored urine or light stools
  • Easy bruising or bleeding
  • Rash or itching
  • Yellowing skin or eyes
  • Severe weakness or tiredness
  • Tingling or numbness in your hands or feet
  • Dizziness

NOTE:It is normal if your urine, saliva, or tears become orange-colored. Soft contact lenses may become stained.

Page last reviewed: September 21, 2016