Injury Prevention in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities

Each tribal community in Indian country is unique with its own set of traditions, languages, spiritual practices, connections to elders, and social ties. Native communities work with the support of CDC’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (Injury Center) to prevent injuries, the leading cause of death for American Indians and Alaska Natives between the ages of 1 and 54.

The Injury Center partners with and supports native communities, federally recognized tribes, Tribal Epidemiology Centersexternal icon, tribal organizations, and Indian Health Serviceexternal icon to improve health and wellness.

The Star Collection
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The Star Collection books for young American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) readers features and celebrates feeling connected to culture and community and having positive relationships with others that are safe, stable, and nurturing.

Violence against AIAN People

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is committed to improving the health and safety of American Indian Alaska Native (AIAN) people.

FactSheet

The rate of drug overdose deaths among American Indians and Alaska Natives is above the national average and recent data show this trend continuing. CDC released funds to support 11 Tribal Epidemiology Centers and 15 tribal entities. These funds will improve opioid overdose surveillance and help address the opioid crisis in tribal communities.

  • Minnesota’s Department of Health reports data through an opioid dashboardexternal icon and provides technical assistance to support state opioid use surveillance – this resource is available to 11 local tribal nations.

Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of unintentional injury death for American Indians and Alaska Natives. Adult (aged ≥20 years) motor vehicle-related death rates for American Indians and Alaska Natives are more than twice that of non-Hispanic whites or blacks. Proven strategies to reduce motor vehicle injuries and deaths can be successfully tailored to tribal communities.

The agency is working with American Indian and Alaska Native partners to prevent Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) by promoting safe, stable, nurturing relationships and environments.

American Indians and Alaska Natives are at higher risk of dying by suicide compared with other Americans. In 2019, non-Hispanic American Indian and Alaska Native people had a suicide rate 60% greater than the general population. CDC is working with tribes to reduce risk and increase protective factors to prevent suicide among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

CDC’s Injury Center is funding a cooperative agreement to support tribal organizations working to increase capacity to adapt, implement, and evaluate suicide prevention programs to reduce suicide-related morbidity and mortality.

Resources
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  • National Indian Health Board ACEs:external icon
    • Information hub includes a “resource basket” designed for American Indian and Alaska Native individuals, families, communities, professionals, and leaders that can assist Tribes to learn more about ACEs, research, tools, and interventions. This Information Hub is the result of a partnership between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Indian Health Board (NIHB).