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Maternal Immunization: Current Status and Future Directions

Presented on .

The September session of Grand Rounds, Maternal Immunization: Current Status and Future Directions,was viewed in 9 foreign countries and 47 states and the District of Columbia.

Pregnant women should routinely receive the Tdap (pertussis) vaccine and the influenza (flu) vaccine, as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). These vaccines have been shown to provide significant benefits to mother and baby.

Maternal Tdap vaccination helps protect infants who are at the greatest risk for developing pertussis (whooping cough) and its life-threatening complications. Flu vaccination during pregnancy is safe and helps protect babies from influenza for several months after birth. This is important because babies younger than 6 months of age are too young to get a flu vaccine. While Tdap and the flu vaccine are effective and safe, vaccination coverage of pregnant women remains too low.

Join us to learn about the burden of influenza and pertussis during pregnancy and among infants, the benefits of maternal immunization, and the development of new vaccines. Speakers will explore the barriers to immunizations and highlight Grady Memorial Hospital’s successes with maternal immunization.

Pregnant women should routinely receive the Tdap (pertussis) vaccine and the flu vaccine to protect both mother and child. Dr. John Iskander and Dr. Denise Jamieson explain the benefits of these vaccines and highlight Grady Hospital’s successful vaccination efforts.

Learn More: Maternal Immunization Tool Kitexternal icon

Hear how whooping cough sounds in a childmedia iconexternal icon

 

Presented By
Amy Parker Fiebelkorn, MSN, MPH, CAPT, USPHS
Vaccine Task Force Deputy
Adult and Influenza Immunization Team
Office of the Director, Immunization Services Division
National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC
"Maternal Vaccination against Influenza and Pertussis"
Laura E Riley, MD
Given Foundation Professor and Chair
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Weill Cornell Medicine
Obstetrician and Gynecologist-in-Chief
New York-Presbyterian Hospital
"Helping Clinicians Prioritize Maternal Vaccination"
Denise Jamieson, MD, MPH
James Robert McCord Professor and Chair
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Emory University School of Medicine
"How Grady Memorial Hospital Works to Promote and Increase Maternal Immunization"
Saad Omer, MBBS, MPH, PhD
Director
Yale Institute for Global Health
Professor of Medicine
Yale School of Medicine
Susan Dwight Bliss Professor of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases
Yale School of Public Health
"Accelerating Progress with New Maternal Vaccines"
Facilitated By
John Iskander, MD, MPH
Scientific Director
Phoebe Thorpe, MD, MPH
Deputy Scientific Director
Susan Laird, MSN, RN
Communications Director
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Continuing Education

This session is available for Continuing Education (CE). Register here using the course information below.

CDC Course Code: PHGR10
CPE UAN: 0387-0000-19-000-L04-P

For more information, see Grand Rounds Continuing Education.

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Page last reviewed: September 20, 2019
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