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Presented on .

On Thursday, September 17, Dr. Frieden kicked off the first session of the Public Health Grand Rounds entitled “Getting to Zero Traffic-Related Deaths,” a presentation on motor vehicle safety sponsored by the Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention (DUIP), National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).

This presentation is not available in video format. For presentation contents, see the presentation slide deck [1 MB, 25 Pages].

Man in car fastening seatbelt

Presented By

Grant Baldwin, PhD, MPH
Director, Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention
National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, CDC
Ann Dellinger, PhD
Motor Vehicle Team Lead, Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention
National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, CDC
David Sleet, PhD
Associate Director for Science, Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention
National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, CDC
Justin McNaull, MBA
Director, State Relations
AAA National
Barron H. Lerner, MD, PhD
Professor, Department of Medicine
Division of Medical Humanities, NYU Langone Medical Center

Facilitated By

Tanja Popovic, MD, PhD
Scientific Director

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  • Page last reviewed: February 28, 2018
  • Page last updated: February 28, 2018
  • Content source:
    • Office of the Associate Director for Science
    • Page maintained by: Office of the Associate Director for Communication
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