Grand Rounds are presented live every 3rd Tuesday of each month. Can't catch it live? Check out the Grand Rounds On Demand archive for our past presentations.

Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis: Tools for Tackling a New Face of an Old Foe

Presented on .

Tuberculosis is an ancient disease that remains an important global cause of morbidity and mortality. In most cases, TB can be treated and cured by taking a combination of several drugs for 6 to 12 months. When inappropriate or incomplete treatment takes place, however, TB bacteria can develop resistance to multiple drugs. Treatment of drug-resistant TB is currently longer, more toxic, more complex, and less effective than for drug-susceptible TB. In 2011, less than 10% of the total estimated multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) cases were detected and annually, there are approximately 500,000 cases of MDR TB, and 150,000 deaths. Although there are simple rapid tests that have improved the diagnosis of the disease, there is immense potential to increase the number of persons diagnosed with MDR TB, and diagnose them more quickly so that they can begin treatment sooner.

In this session we discussed how more patients can benefit from advances in diagnostic and treatment options, resulting in an overall reduction in morbidity from MDR TB. This session of Grand Rounds also explored the role of CDC, WHO and other partners in combating this public health epidemic.

Beyond the Data

Dr. John Iskander and Dr. Sarita Shah discuss the public health burden of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) and the new tools that are available for more accurate diagnosis and treatment of MDR TB. Revolutionary tests will allow for faster diagnosis and new drugs offer better treatment with fewer side effects, but patients and providers must also do their part to combat this health epidemic.

Patients must:

  • Come to their providers in a timely fashion and
  • Complete the full course of treatment

Providers must:

  • Improve diagnosis and treatment of drug susceptible TB and
  • Emphasize proper Infection control practices
Presented By
Sarita Shah, MD, MPH
Associate Chief for Science, International Research and Programs Branch, Division of TB Elimination
National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, CDC
Thomas M. Shinnick, PhD
Associate Director for Global Laboratory Activities, Division of TB Elimination
National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, CDC
Christian Lienhardt, MD, PhD, MSc
Senior Research Advisor, Global TB Program
World Health Organization
Tom Kenyon, MD, MPH
Director
Center for Global Health, CDC
Darlene Von Delft, MBChB
Emergency Medicine Doctor
Mediclinic Vergelegen Hospital
Facilitated By
John Iskander, MD, MPH
Scientific Director
Susan Laird, MSN, RN
Communications Director
Enjoyed this Presentation?
Social_govd

Get notified about the latest updates from Public Health Grand Rounds right in your inbox by setting up an alert today!

Social_govd

Get notified about the latest updates from Public Health Grand Rounds right in your inbox by setting up an alert today!Sign Up

Social_govdSign Up

Get notified about the latest updates from Public Health Grand Rounds right in your inbox by setting up an alert today!

You May Also Like
March 2011, HIV/STD/TB
Three men, smiling

Tuberculosis (TB) still remains a serious threat, especially for those infected with HIV. HIV is the single most powerful risk factor for TB disease and one of the leading causes of death among people infected with HIV. Learn about TB and HIV and hear what is needed to prevent deaths from this lethal combination.

October 2016, Environmental, Prevention
a lab worker in protective clothing adding a solution to an ELISA plate

When it comes to tracking infectious diseases and outbreaks, determining who is infected with a particular pathogen is the first step. Newer tests are making these determinations faster, but they lack crucial information. Hear about the challenges and promises of the changing landscape of diagnosing infectious diseases.

Page last reviewed: February 28, 2018
Content source: