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Presented on .

Cancer is the second-leading cause of death among Americans and takes a toll on communities across the United States. One of the effective ways to reduce our nation’s burden from cancer is to ensure that high quality screening services are available and accessible to all Americans. Screening for cervical, colorectal, and breast cancers is supported by sound scientific evidence, and helps find these diseases early when they are easiest to treat.

This session of Grand Rounds explored new ways that public health can increase the rate of evidence-based cancer screening, and decrease disparities in screening rates. Viewers learned about the effectiveness of screening, successful organized cancer screening programs in the United States and abroad, and opportunities with the Affordable Care Act. The session concluded with future directions for CDC and the nation’s public health system to improve cancer screening.

Beyond the Data

Dr. John Iskander and Dr. Marcus Plescia discuss the approaches necessary to improve cancer prevention screening rates:

  • Widespread access to affordable health insurance
  • Continued provider recommendations
  • Strategic approaches to reaching the public

Presented By

Otis W. Brawley, MD
Chief Medical Officer
American Cancer Society
Rachel Ballard-Barbash, MD, MPH
Associate Director, Applied Research Program,
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control and Population Services,
National Cancer Institute

National Institutes of Health
Ned Calonge, MD
President and CEO
The Colorado Trust
Theodore R. Levin, MD
Clinical Lead for Colorectal Cancer Screening
Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research
Marcus Plescia, MD, MPH
Director, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC

Facilitated By

Tanja Popovic, MD, PhD
Scientific Director
John Iskander, MD, MPH
Deputy Scientific Director
Susan Laird, MSN, RN
Communications Director

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  • Page last reviewed: January 28, 2018
  • Page last updated: January 28, 2018
  • Content source:
    • Office of the Associate Director for Science
    • Page maintained by: Office of the Associate Director for Communication
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