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On Thursday, October 15, Dr. Frieden introduced the second session of the Public Health Grand Rounds entitled “Toward Elimination of Healthcare-Associated Infections,” a presentation on healthcare-associated infections presented by Chesley Richards, MD, Deputy Director DHQP.

P.J. Brennan, MD, who has been instrumental in establishing Pennsylvania as the first state to report HAI data hospital-wide, led a focused discussion along with Barry Straube, MD, who discussed the role that Medicare and Medicaid will play in eliminating HAIs.

This presentation is not available in video format. For presentation contents, see the presentation slide deck [1.6 MB, 81 pages].

Hands wearing gloves and holding syringe

Presented By

Chesley Richards, MD, MPH
Deputy Director, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion
National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases, CDC
Patrick J. Brennan, MD
Professor of Medicine
Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Health System
Barry M. Straube, MD
Chief Medical Officer
Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Facilitated By

Tanja Popovic, MD, PhD
Scientific Director

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  • Page last reviewed: February 28, 2018
  • Page last updated: February 28, 2018
  • Content source:
    • Office of the Associate Director for Science
    • Page maintained by: Office of the Associate Director for Communication
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