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Recommended Vaccines by Age

Vaccination is one of the best ways parents can protect infants, children, and teens from 16 potentially harmful diseases that can be very serious, may require hospitalization, or even be deadly.

And immunizations are not just for children. Protection from some childhood vaccines can wear off over time. Adults may also be at risk for vaccine-preventable disease due to age, job, lifestyle, travel, or health conditions.

Review the tabs below to learn what other vaccines you and your family may need. Check with your family’s healthcare professionals to make sure everyone is up to date on recommended vaccines.

Birth

Before leaving the hospital or birthing center, your baby receives the first of 3 doses of the vaccine that protects against Hepatitis B. Hepatitis B virus can cause chronic swelling of the liver and possible lifelong complications. It’s important to protect infants and young children from hepatitis B because they are more likely than adults to develop incurable chronic (long term) infection that can result in liver damage and liver cancer.

Immunization Schedule
Recommended Immunizations for Children from Birth through 6 years Old

1 to 2 Months

Protect your baby by providing immunity early in life. Starting at 1 to 2 months of age, your baby receives the following vaccines to develop immunity from potentially harmful diseases:

Immunization Schedule
Recommended Immunizations for Children from Birth through 6 years Old

4 Months

Protect your baby by providing immunity early in life. Stay on track with the recommended vaccine schedule. At 4 months of age, your baby receives the following vaccines to develop immunity from potentially harmful diseases:

Immunization Schedule
Recommended Immunizations for Children from Birth through 6 years Old

6 Months

Protect your baby by providing immunity early in life. Stay on track with the recommended vaccine schedule. At 6 months of age, your baby receives the following vaccines to develop immunity from potentially harmful diseases:

Immunization Schedule
Recommended Immunizations for Children from Birth through 6 years Old

7-11 Months

There are usually no vaccinations scheduled between 7 and 11 months of age. However, if your baby has missed an earlier vaccination, now is a good time to “catch up.”

Babies 6 months and older should receive flu vaccination every flu season.

Immunization Schedule
Recommended Immunizations for Children from Birth through 6 years Old

12 to 23 Months

By following the recommended schedule and fully immunizing your child by 2 years of age, your child should be protected against 14 vaccine preventable diseases. Between 12 and 23 months of age, your child receives the following vaccines to continue developing immunity from potentially harmful diseases:

Additionally, children should receive flu vaccination every flu season.

Immunization Schedule
Recommended Immunizations for Children from Birth through 6 years Old

2 to 3 Years

Between 2 and 3 years of age, your child should visit the doctor once a year for check-ups.

Additionally, children should receive flu vaccination every flu season.

Immunization Schedule
Recommended Immunizations for Children from Birth through 6 years Old

4 to 6 Years

Between 4 through 6 years of age, your child should visit the doctor once a year for check-ups. During this time, your child receives the following vaccines:

Immunization Schedule
Recommended Immunizations for Children from Birth through 6 years Old

7 to 10 Years

Between 7 and 10 years of age, your child should visit the doctor once a year for check-ups.

Additionally, children should receive flu vaccination every flu season.

Immunization Schedule
Recommended Immunizations for Preteens and Teens (7-18 years)

11 to 12 Years

There are four vaccines recommended for preteens—these vaccines help protect your children, their friends, and their family members.

Immunization Schedule
Recommended Immunizations for Preteens and Teens (7-18 years)

13 to 18 Years

Between 13 through 18 years old, your child should visit the doctor once each year for check-ups. This can be a great time to get any vaccines your teen may have missed or may need if traveling outside the United States.

Additional, everyone 6 months and older should receive flu vaccination every flu season.

Immunization Schedule
Recommended Immunizations for Preteens and Teens (7-18 years)

19 to 26 Years

In addition to seasonal flu (influenza) vaccine and Td or Tdap vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis), you should also get HPV vaccine which protects against the human papillomaviruses that causes most cervical cancers, anal cancer, and genital warts. It is recommended for women up to age 26 years, men up to age 21 years, and men ages 22-26 who have sex with men

Some vaccines may be recommended for adults because of particular job or school-related requirements, health conditions, lifestyle or other factors. Some states require students entering colleges and universities to be vaccinated against certain diseases like meningitis due to increased risk among college students living in residential housing.

Immunization Schedules

27 to 60 Years

All adults need a seasonal flu (influenza) vaccine every year. Flu vaccine is especially important for people with chronic health conditions, pregnant women, and older adults.

Every adult should get the Tdap vaccine once if they did not receive it as an adolescent to protect against pertussis (whooping cough), and then a Td (tetanus, diphtheria) booster shot every 10 years. In addition, women should get the Tdap vaccine each time they are pregnant, preferably at 27 through 36 weeks.

Healthy adults aged 50 years and older should get a zoster vaccine to prevent shingles and the complications from the disease.

Some vaccines may be recommended for adults because of particular job or school-related requirements, health conditions, lifestyle or other factors.

Immunization Schedules

60 Years or Older

In addition to seasonal flu (influenza) vaccine and Td or Tdap vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis), people 65 years and older should also get:

  • Pneumococcal vaccines, which protect against pneumococcal disease, including infections in the lungs and bloodstream (recommended for all adults over 65 years old, and for adults younger than 65 years who have certain chronic health conditions)
  • Zoster vaccine, which protects against shingles (recommended for adults 50 years or older)

Immunization Schedules

2016 recommended immunizations for adults. information for children from birth through 6 years old. chart as described in link

Child Schedule

Recommended Immunizations for Children from Birth through 6 years Old.

2016 recommended immunizations for adults. information for children 7-18 years old. chart as described in link

Teen Schedule

Recommended Immunizations for Children 7-18 Years Old.

2016 recommended immunizations for adults. information for adult patients. chart as described in link

Adult Schedule

Recommended Immunizations for Adults.

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