Resources to Encourage Routine Childhood Vaccinations

Background

Help us protect children by doing what you can to get kids caught up on recommended vaccines. CDC’s public sector vaccine ordering data show a 14% drop in 2020-2021 compared to 2019, and measles vaccine ordering is down by more than 20%.

CDC’s call to action pdf icon[1 page] outlined the steps that healthcare systems, healthcare providers, schools, state and local governments, and families can take to encourage catch up vaccination and protect children’s health.

Vaccination Coverage with Selected Vaccines and Exemption Rates Among Children in Kindergarten — United States, 2020–21

The national vaccination coverage among kindergarten children during the 2020-2021 school year dropped by about 1% from the previous year— that amounts to 35,000 more children without vaccination documents.

Vaccination Coverage with Selected Vaccines and Exemption Rates Among Children in Kindergarten — United States, 2020–21 School Year | MMWR

Catch up on Well-Child Visits and Recommended Vaccinations
Let's play catch-up on routine vaccines

Use this web feature as a link in your social media posts, newsletters or other communication.

Social Media Content

Use or customize these messages on your social media platforms to spread the word about childhood vaccination in your community.

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Infographic

Use this infographic to educate parents on the importance of getting children caught up on well-child visits and routine childhood vaccinations. The infographic is also available to download and print.

Power to Protect infographic

Vaccines: Power to Protect

HTML | PDF pdf icon[1 page]

Newsletter template

Use this suggested language in emails or digital communications with parents.

Stay on track with your child’s vaccinations

As a parent, you want to keep your children safe. Routine childhood vaccinations are an important way to ensure that your child and community remain healthy and protected against serious diseases, like measles and whooping cough.

Now that in-person activities and play have resumed, [YOUR ORGANIZATION] encourages parents to make sure children are up to date on routinely recommended vaccines. Well-child visits and check-ups are essential for routine vaccination, even during the pandemic.

You can also review the 2022 easy-to-read immunization schedule recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  If you’re pregnant, now is a great time to find a doctor for your baby and schedule a visit to discuss any questions you have about vaccines.

For more information about vaccines and the diseases they prevent, visit these resources from the CDC:

If you have questions about vaccines, talk to your child’s healthcare provider.

Page last reviewed: May 6, 2022