Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Filtering out Confusion: Frequently Asked Questions about Respiratory Protection

Image of cover page for Publication 2018-130

Filtering out Confusion: Frequently Asked Questions about Respiratory Protection, User Seal Check

DHHS (NIOSH) Publication Number 2018-130 (April 2018)
Over 3 million United States employees in approximately 1.3 million workplaces are required to wear respiratory protection. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) (29 CFR 1910.134) requires an annual fit test to confirm the fit of any respirator that forms a tight seal on the wearer’s face before it is used in the workplace. Once a fit test has been done to determine the best respirator model and size for a particular user, a user seal check should be done every time the respirator is to be worn to ensure an adequate seal is achieved.


Image of cover page for publication 2018-129

Filtering out Confusion: Frequently Asked Questions about Respiratory Protection, Fit Testing

DHHS (NIOSH) Publication Number 2018-129 (April 2018)
Over 3 million United States employees, in approximately 1.3 million workplaces, are required to wear respiratory protection. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) (29 CFR 1910.134) requires an annual respirator fit test to confirm the fit of any respirator that forms a tight seal on the wearer’s face before it is used in the workplace. This ensures that users are receiving the expected level of protection by minimizing any contaminant leakage into the facepiece. The following are some frequently asked questions about respiratory protection and fit testing.


Image of cover page for publication 2018-128

Filtering out Confusion: Frequently Asked Questions about Respiratory Protection, Respirator Reuse and Extended Use

DHHS (NIOSH) Publication Number 2018-128 (April 2018)
Nationwide, approximately 1.3 million workplaces provide at least a portion of their employees with respiratory protection. One of the most common types of respiratory protection is the filtering facepiece respirator (FFR), which is designed to be discarded when it becomes unsuitable for further use due to considerations of hygiene, excessive resistance, or physical damage. However, due to the considerations of cost, convenience, and supply, respiratory protection program managers have great interest in the practices of reuse and extended use of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-approved FFRs that are not damaged or soiled. The following are a few of the most frequently asked questions about respirator reuse.

TOP