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STD Multimedia Resources

STDs Multimedia Resources

Below are multimedia resources for news media outlets. Please feel free to pair your compelling messages with the available photos, videos, social media posts, infographics and data. These multimedia resources are in the public domain and are thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy, we ask that the content provider be credited and notified of any public or private usage of an image. This page will be updated as new resources become available.

If you need more information about the data connected to the release, please click the more information button to find accompanying press releases, articles, and reports.

Commonly Requested Multimedia

Illustration of Chlamydia trachomatis bacteria

Illustration of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

This image is an illustration of Chlamydia trachomatis bacteria

Illustration of Chlamydia trachomatis bacteria

Illustration of syphilis bacteria

Illustration of syphilis bacteria

This animation shows the benefit and importance of chlamydia screening. Identifying asymptomatic infections can prevent life-long health complications. Once identified, chlamydia can be easily cured with a single dose treatment. If not identified, chlamydia can result in infertility, pregnancy complications, and increased risk of infecting others. CDC recommends annual chlamydia screening for women 25 and under, as well as for older women at high risk.

The Value of Chlamydia Screening


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2018 STD Prevention Conference - August 28, 2018

CDC presented preliminary surveillance data (2017) at the 2018 STD Prevention Conference in Washington, D.C. It found recent increases STDs have continued for four consecutive years — and that the nearly 2.3 million cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis reported to CDC for 2017 exceed the previous 2016 record by more than 200,000 cases.

This infographic presents information on the steep,sustained increases in STDs. The graphic in the first section contains three bar graphs. The first illustrates the 31% increase of total combined diagnoses of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis in 2013 and 2017 (1.8 million cases and 2.3 million cases, respectively).  The second bar chart illustrates the 67% increase in diagnosed gonorrhea cases in 2013 and 2017 (333,004 and 555,608 cases, respectively). The third bar chart illustrates the 76% increase in diagnoses syphilis cases between 2013 and 2017 (17,375 and 60,644 cases, respectively). Finally, the graphic also shows that there were 1.7 million cases of diagnosed chlamydia – making it the most common condition reported to CDC. The second section says Diagnosed cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis represent just a small fraction of the true disease burden. Left untreated these STDs can produce severe, adverse effects: infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and increased HIV risk. The third section contains three facts about the continued concerns about antibiotic resistant gonorrhea: 1) Gonorrhea is expected to eventually wear down our last highly effective antibiotic. 2) Lab tests show a small but growing fraction of gonorrhea samples have signs of emerging antibiotic resistance and 3) CDC recommends a two-drug combination to preserve our last highly effective antibiotic.

The U.S. is Experiencing Steep, Sustained Increases in STDs

The graphic contains three bar graphs. The first illustrates the 31% increase of total combined diagnoses of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis in 2013 and 2017 (1.8 million cases and 2.3 million cases, respectively).  The second bar chart illustrates the 67% increase in diagnosed gonorrhea cases in 2013 and 2017 (333,004 and 555,608 cases, respectively). The third bar chart illustrates the 76% increase in diagnoses syphilis cases between 2013 and 2017 (17,375 and 60,644 cases, respectively). Finally, the graphic also shows that there were 1.7 million cases of diagnosed chlamydia – making it the most common condition reported to CDC.

Steep, Sustained Increases in STDs, 2013-2017

This graphic says: Diagnosed cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis represent just a small fraction of the true disease burden. Left untreated these STDs can produce severe, adverse effects: infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and increased HIV risk.

Undiagnosed STDs Can Lead to Severe Health Problems

This graphic depicts three facts about the continued concerns about antibiotic resistant gonorrhea: 1) Gonorrhea is expected to eventually wear down our last highly effective antibiotic. 2) Lab tests show a small but growing fraction of gonorrhea samples have signs of emerging antibiotic resistance and 3) CDC recommends a two-drug combination to preserve our last highly effective antibiotic.

Continued Concerns About Antibiotic Resistant Gonorrhea

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CDC Data Released Today Show STD Diagnoses at Record High in U.S. – September 26, 2017

CDC data from the 2016 STD surveillance report show more than two million cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis were reported in the United States in 2016, the highest number ever.

This bar chart shows that the increase in the number of cases of syphilis among newborns between 2014 and 2016 has accelerated. In 2014 there were 461 reported cases of congenital syphilis, in 2015 there were 492 reported cases of congenital syphilis, and in 2016 there were 628 reported cases of congenital syphilis.

Increase in syphilis among newborns is accelerating

This bar chart shows that the increase in the number of cases of syphilis among newborns between 2014 and 2016 has accelerated. In 2014 there were 461 reported cases of congenital syphilis, in 2015 there were 492 reported cases of congenital syphilis, and in 2016 there were 628 reported cases of congenital syphilis.

Burden of syphilis highest among men, particularly gay and bisexual

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2015 STD Surveillance Report - Oct. 19, 2016

Data for three nationally reported STDs – chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis – show unprecedented highs in 2015. CDC calls for expanded prevention efforts in light of these increases.

This graphic displays a quote from Dr. Jonathan Mermin, Director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention. He says: We have reached a decisive moment for the nation. STD rates are rising, and many of the country’s systems for preventing STDs have eroded. We must mobilize, rebuild, and expand services – or the human and economic burden will continue to grow.

Dr. Jonathan Mermin on the need to mobilize, rebuild, and expand STD services

This graphic displays a quote from Dr. Gail Bolan, Director of CDC’s Division of STD Prevention. She says: To reverse the STD epidemic, we should all learn to talk more openly about STDs – with our partners, parents, and providers.

Dr. Gail Bolan on talking more openly about STDs

This line graph shows the number of reported cases of primary and secondary syphilis from 2007-2015, broken down by men who have sex with men, men who have sex with women, and women. Trend data show rates of syphilis are increasing at an alarming rate (19 percent in 2015).  Men account for 90 percent of all primary and secondary syphilis cases and men who have sex with men (MSM) account for 82 percent of male cases where the sex of the sex partner is known.  Primary and secondary syphilis are the most infectious stages of the disease, and if not adequately treated, can lead to visual impairment and stroke.

Gay and Bisexual Men Face Highest – and Rising – Number of Syphilis

This bar chart shows the number of gonorrhea and chlamydia cases broken down by age groups. Percentages may not add to 100 because ages were unknown for a small number of cases. Of the 395,216 gonorrhea cases reported in 2015, 1% were among 0-14 year-olds, 18% were among 15-19 year-olds, 32% among 20-24 year-olds, 21% among 25-29 year-olds, 18% among 30-39 year- olds and 10% among those aged 40+. Of the 1,526,658 chlamydia cases reported in 2015 1% were among 0-14 year- olds, 26% were among 15-19 year-olds, 39% among 20-24 year-olds, 18% among 25-29 year-olds, 12% among 30-39 year-olds and 4% among those aged 40+.While sexually transmitted diseases affect individuals of all ages, STDs take a particularly heavy toll on young people.Surveillance data continues to show that numbers and rates of reported chlamydia and gonorrhea cases are highest in Americans between the ages of 15 and 24.

Most Reported Chlamydia and Gonorrhea Infections Occur among 15-24-Year-Olds

Audio

Below are audio clips featuring NCHHSTP Director Jonathan Mermin, MD, MPH and Division of STD Director Gail Bolan, MD. To save the audio clip, right click the audio player and select the “Save audio as…” option.

Dr. Jonathan Mermin on the nation’s decisive moment regarding STDs | View Transcript

Dr. Jonathan Mermin on the nation’s decisive moment regarding STDs

Dr. Jonathan Mermin on reversing the STD epidemics | View Transcript

Dr. Jonathan Mermin on reversing the STD epidemics

Dr. Gail Bolan on the importance of talking openly about STDs | View Transcript

Dr. Gail Bolan on the importance of talking openly about STDs

Dr. Gail Bolan on the devastating consequences of syphilis | View Transcript

Dr. Gail Bolan on the devastating consequences of syphilis

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2016 STD Prevention Conference - September 22, 2016

Data (2015) presented at the conference reinforces that sexually active gay and bisexual men are at high risk for syphilis – and that syphilis affects gay and bisexual men in some parts of the country more than others.

This graphic shows rates of primary and secondary syphilis infection among MSM in 44 states and was developed using preliminary 2015 national syphilis case report data and 2014 population estimates of the number of adult MSM by state. Researchers developed rates for the 44 states that reported the sex of partners for at least 70 percent of the men diagnosed with P&S syphilis in 2015. Estimates of syphilis rates among MSM vary from 73.1 per 100,000 in Alaska to 748.3 in North Carolina.

Primary and secondary syphilis rates among MSM by U.S. State – 44 states, 2015

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STDs Among Youth

Half of the estimated 20 million sexually transmitted infections (STIs) that occur each year in the United States occur among young adults ages 15-24. The following graphics can help inform your stories on this important topic.

This line chart depicts how many youth (data among youth ages 15-24) have diagnosed and reported gonorrhea (200,000) and chlamydia (1 million) as compared to the number of estimated total new infections of gonorrhea (570,000) and chlamydia (1.8 million). This comparison demonstrates that many youth do not know they’re infected because STIs often have no symptoms.

Many do not know they’re infected because STIs often have no symptoms

This graphic states young people can get tested, reduce risk behavior, and get vaccinated against HPV to protect themselves from STIs.

Young people can protect themselves

This graphic illustrates American youth bear a disproportionate share of STIs. Americans ages 15-24 make up just 27 percent of the sexually active population, but account for 50 percent of the 20 million new STIs in the U.S. each year.

Youth bear disproportionate share of STIs

This graphic illustrates the fact that young people account for a substantial proportion of new STIs. Six speedometer-like images depict the percentage of total STI infections (all ages) that are persons aged 15-24. Young people make up 70 percent of all gonorrhea cases (820,000 total); 63 percent of all chlamydia cases (2.0 million total); 49% of all HPV cases (14.1 million total); 45 percent of all Genital Herpes cases (776,000 total); 26 percent (ages 13-24) of HIV cases (47,500 total); and 20 percent of all Syphilis cases (55,400 total).

Young people account for a substantial proportion of new

This set of graphics illustrates the unique factors that place youth at risk for STIs. There are five risk factors depicted: 1. Insufficient Screening—Many young women don’t receive the chlamydia screening CDC recommends; 2. Confidentiality Concerns—Many are reluctant to disclose risk behaviors; 3. Biology—Young women’s bodies are biologically more susceptible to STIs; 4. Lack of Access to Healthcare—Youth often lack insurance or transportation needed to access prevention services; and 5. Multiple Sex Partners—Many young people have multiples partners, which increases STI risk.

Unique factors place youth at risk

This graphic illustrates the fact that consequences of STIs are particularly severe for young women. Undiagnosed STIs cause 24,000 women to become infertile each year.

Consequences are particularly severe for young women

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Multimedia Archive

Medical illustration of Neisseria gonorrhoeae under a microscope

Illustration of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Under Microscope

Pie charts showing drastic increase of primary and secondary syphilis cases from 2000-2014.

Primary and Secondary Syphilis in the U.S., 2000-2014

This bar chart shows the number of gonorrhea and chlamydia cases broken down by age groups. Percentages may not add to 100 because ages were unknown for a small number of cases. Of the 395,216 gonorrhea cases reported in 2015, 1% were among 0-14 year-olds, 18% were among 15-19 year-olds, 32% among 20-24 year-olds, 21% among 25-29 year-olds, 18% among 30-39 year- olds and 10% among those aged 40+. Of the 1,526,658 chlamydia cases reported in 2015 1% were among 0-14 year- olds, 26% were among 15-19 year-olds, 39% among 20-24 year-olds, 18% among 25-29 year-olds, 12% among 30-39 year-olds and 4% among those aged 40+.While sexually transmitted diseases affect individuals of all ages, STDs take a particularly heavy toll on young people.Surveillance data continues to show that numbers and rates of reported chlamydia and gonorrhea cases are highest in Americans between the ages of 15 and 24.

Most Reported Chlamydia and Gonorrhea Infections Occur among 15-24-Year-Olds

Tiny version of 2008 chart showing estimated numbers of new sexually transmitted infections.

Estimated number of new sexually transmitted infections

Primary and Secondary Syphilis in the U.S., 2000-2014

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