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CDC Publishes First National Study of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual High School Students’ Health

August 11, 2016 – First National Study of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Students’ Health Finds Higher Levels of Physical/Sexual Violence and Bullying than Peers

The first nationally representative study of U.S. lesbian, gay and bisexual high school students finds they experience substantially higher levels of physical and sexual violence and bullying than other students – and are at risk for several serious outcomes.

Resources

Graphics: Select Data Points from the First National Study of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Students’ Health

The following graphics highlight major findings from the report, Sexual Identity, Sex of Sexual Contacts, and Health-Related Behaviors Among Students in Grades 9-12 – United States and Selected Sites, 2015. These high-resolution, public domain images are ready to download and print in your publication. Click on a graphic to see it in high-resolution.

These images are in the public domain and are thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy, we ask that the content provider be credited and notified of any public or private usage of an image.

Percentage of Students Who Were Ever Physically Forced to Have Sexual Intercourse
This bar chart shows the percentage of high school students who were ever forced to have sexual intercourse. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual students (18 percent) were more than three times more likely to have ever been forced to have sexual intercourse than their heterosexual peers (5 percent).

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Compared to their heterosexual peers, lesbian, gay, and bisexual students were more than 3 times more likely to have ever been physically forced to have sexual intercourse.

Percentage of Students Who Experienced Sexual Dating Violence
This bar chart shows the percentage of high school students who experienced sexual dating violence. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual students (23 percent) were more than two times more likely to have experienced sexual dating violence than their heterosexual peers (9 percent).

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Compared to their heterosexual peers, lesbian, gay, and bisexual students were more than 2 times more likely to have experienced sexual dating violence.

Percentage of Students Who Experienced Physical Dating Violence
This bar chart shows the percentage of high school students who experienced physical dating violence. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual students (18 percent) were more than two times more likely to have experienced physical dating violence than their heterosexual peers (8 percent).

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Compared to their heterosexual peers, lesbian, gay, and bisexual high school students were more than 2 times more likely to have experienced physical dating violence.

Percentage of Students Who Were Bullied on School Property
This bar chart shows the percentage of high school students who were bullied on school property. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual students (34 percent) were nearly two times more likely to be bullied on school property than their heterosexual peers (19 percent).

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Compared to their heterosexual peers, lesbian, gay, and bisexual students were nearly 2 times more likely to be bullied on school property.

Percentage of Students Who Were Electronically Bullied
This bar chart shows the percentage of high school students who were electronically bullied. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual students (28 percent) were nearly two times more likely to be electronically bullied than their heterosexual peers (14 percent).

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Compared to their heterosexual peers, lesbian, gay, and bisexual students were nearly 2 times more likely to be electronically bullied.

Spokespersons

Debra E. Houry, MD, MPH

Debra E. Houry

“All of us can help to position lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth to survive and thrive in their environments, and it’s critical that we take action.” Debra E. Houry, M.D., M.P.H., director of CDC’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control

Jonathan Mermin, M.D.

Jonathan Mermin

“Quantifying these risks and negative outcomes on a national scale is critical to protect the health and well-being of more than 1 million lesbian, gay, and bisexual students.”Jonathan Mermin, M.D., director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention

Laura Kann, Ph.D

Laura Kann

“While smaller studies have shown similar disparities, this study documents the national scope of the problem and will open the door to the type of analyses, research, and programs needed to protect the next generation.”Laura Kann, Ph.D., chief of the School-Based Surveillance Branch within CDC’s Division of Adolescent and School Health

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