Viral Suppression

Viral suppression is one of the six Ending the HIV Epidemic in the U.S. indicators. Viral suppression refers to the percentage of people with diagnosed HIV who have less than 200 copies of HIV per milliliter of blood.

Ending the HIV Epidemic goal banner for viral suppression.
This banner explains that people with HIV who get and keep an undetectable viral load will not transmit HIV to sex partners.
HIV Care Among People with Diagnosed HIV in 45 States and the District of Columbia, 2020*
This chart shows the proportion of people with diagnosed HIV who received some HIV care, were retained in care, and were virally suppressed.
This chart shows the proportion of people with diagnosed HIV who received some HIV care, were retained in care, and were virally suppressed.

Data for 2020 should be interpreted with caution due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on access to HIV testing, care-related services, and case surveillance activities in state and local jurisdictions

* Among people aged 13 and older.
† At least 1 viral load or CD4 test.
‡ Had 2 viral load or CD4 tests at least 3 months apart in a year.
** Based on most recent viral load test.

Source: CDC. Monitoring selected national HIV prevention and care objectives by using HIV surveillance data—United States and 6 dependent areas, 2020. HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2022;27(3).

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People with Diagnosed HIV in the US and Dependent Areas by Age, 2020
People with diagnosed HIV are living longer, healthier lives because of effective HIV treatment. At the end of 2020, over half of people with diagnosed HIV were aged 50 and older.
This chart shows the number of people with diagnosed HIV by age.

Data for 2020 should be interpreted with caution due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on access to HIV testing, care-related services, and case surveillance activities in state and local jurisdictions

Source: CDC. Diagnoses of HIV infection in the United States and dependent areas, 2020HIV Surveillance Report 2022;33.

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 a Unless otherwise noted, data in this web content are for adults and adolescents aged 13 and older.
b American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, the Republic of Palau, and the US Virgin Islands.
C HIV incidence data are not available for transgender people. For more information about transgender people, visit CDC’s HIV and Transgender People web content.
d Includes infections attributed to male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use (men who reported both risk factors).
e A person whose gender identity or expression is different from their sex assigned at birth.
f A person assigned male at birth who identifies as female.
g A person assigned female at birth who identifies as male.
h Includes infections attributed to male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use (men who reported both risk factors).
i The term male-to-male sexual contact is used in CDC surveillance systems. It indicates a behavior that transmits HIV infection, not how individuals self-identify in terms of their sexuality. This web content uses the term gay and bisexual men to represent gay, bisexual, and other men who reported male-to-male sexual contact.
j Includes people who have ever had sexual contact with a person known to have, or with a risk factor for, HIV. Does not include men who have ever had sexual contact with both men and women.
k Does not include infections attributed to male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use (men who reported both risk factors).
l Regions used in CDC’s National HIV Surveillance System:
Northeast: CT, ME, MA, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VT
Midwest: IL, IN, IA, KS, MI, MN, MO, NE, ND, OH, SD, WI
South: AL, AR, DE, DC, FL, GA, KY, LA, MD, MS, NC, OK, SC, TN, TX, VA, WV
West: AK, AZ, CA, CO, HI, ID, MT, NV, NM, OR, UT, WA, WY