HIV in the United States and Dependent Areas

In 2018, 37,832 people received an HIV diagnosisa in the United States (US) and dependent areas.b From 2010 to 2017, HIV diagnoses decreased 11% among adults and adolescents in the 50 states and District of Columbia. However, annual diagnoses have increased among some groups.

HIV Diagnoses

This banner shows 69% of the 37,832 new HIV diagnoses in the United States and dependent areas were among gay and bisexual men, 24% were among heterosexuals, and 7% were among people who inject drugs.

New HIV Diagnoses in the US and Dependent Areas for the Most-Affected Subpopulations, 2018

This bar chart shows new HIV diagnoses among the most affected subpopulations United States and dependent areas in 2018. Black/African American, male-to-male sexual contact = 9,499; Hispanic/Latino, male-to-male sexual contact = 7,543; White, male-to-male sexual contact = 6,423; Black/African American women, heterosexual contact = 3,768; Black/African American men, heterosexual contact = 1,678; Hispanic women/Latinas, heterosexual contact = 1,109; White women, heterosexual contact = 999.

Subpopulations representing 2% or less of all people who received an HIV diagnosis in 2018 are not represented in this chart.
Source: CDC. Diagnoses of HIV infection in the United States and dependent areas, 2018pdf icon. HIV Surveillance Report 2019;30.

New HIV Diagnoses in the US and Dependent Areas by Age, 2018

This bar chart shows new HIV diagnoses by age in the United States and dependent areas in 2018.  13 to 24 = 7,807; 25 to 34 = 13,458; 35 to 44 = 7,237; 45 to 54 = 5,377; 55 and older = 3,862.

Source: CDC. Diagnoses of HIV infection in the United States and dependent areas, 2018pdf icon. HIV Surveillance Report 2019;30.

Gay and Bisexual Men

Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with menc are the population most affected by HIV. In 2018, gay and bisexual men accounted for 69% of the 37,832 new HIV diagnoses and 86% of diagnoses among males.d

New HIV Diagnoses Among Gay and Bisexual Men in the US and Dependent Areas by Race/Ethnicity, 2018d

This pie chart shows HIV diagnoses among gay and bisexual men in the United States and dependent areas in 2018 by race. Black/African American gay and bisexual men made up 37% of new HIV diagnoses, Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men made up 30%, white gay and bisexual men made up 27%, Asian gay and bisexual men made up 3%, gay and bisexual men of multiple races made up 2%, American Indian/Alaska Native gay and bisexual men made up 1% and Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander gay and bisexual men made up less than 1% of new HIV diagnoses.

Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
Source: CDC. Diagnoses of HIV infection in the United States and dependent areas, 2018pdf icon. HIV Surveillance Report 2019;30.

HIV Diagnoses Among Gay and Bisexual Men in the 50 States and District of Columbia, 2010-2017d

This trend chart shows HIV diagnoses among gay and bisexual men in 50 states and the District of Columbia from 2010 to 2016. HIV diagnoses remained stable among gay and bisexual men overall. Gay and bisexual men by race/ethnicity, Black/African American gay and bisexual men remained stable; Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men increased 18%; white gay and bisexual men decreased 16%; Asian gay and bisexual men increased 52%; gay and bisexual men of multiple races decreased 34%; American Indian/Alaska Native gay and bisexual men increased 76%; and Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander gay and bisexual men decreased 6%.

The overall trend was stable, but there were large increases/decreases in subpopulations with fewer diagnoses.
Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
Source: CDC. NCHHSTP AtlasPlus. Accessed December 18, 2019.

Heterosexuals

Heterosexuals continue to be affected by HIV. In 2018, heterosexuals accounted for 24% of the 37,832 new HIV diagnoses.e

  • Heterosexual men accounted for 7% of new HIV diagnoses.
  • Heterosexual women accounted for 16% of new HIV diagnoses.

HIV Diagnoses Among Heterosexuals in the 50 States and District of Columbia, 2010-2017

This trend chart shows HIV diagnoses among heterosexuals in 50 states and the District of Columbia from 2010 to 2016. HIV diagnoses decreased 20% overall among heterosexuals. By sex, heterosexual men decreased 21% and heterosexual women decreased 19%.

Source: CDC. NCHHSTP AtlasPlus. Accessed December 18, 2019.

People Who Inject Drugs (PWID)

In 2018, PWID accounted for 7% of the 37,832 new HIV diagnoses.f

  • Men who inject drugs accounted for 4% of new HIV diagnoses.
  • Women who inject drugs accounted for 3% of new HIV diagnoses.

HIV Diagnoses Among People Who Inject Drugs in the 50 States and District of Columbia, 2010-2017

This trend chart shows HIV diagnoses among people who inject drugs (PWID) in 50 states and the District of Columbia from 2010 to 2016. HIV diagnoses decreased 35% overall among PWID. By sex, PWID men decreased 37% and PWID women decreased 33%.

Source: CDC. NCHHSTP AtlasPlus. Accessed December 18, 2019.

By Race/Ethnicity

Blacks/African Americansg and Hispanics/Latinosh are disproportionately affected by HIV. In 2018:

  • Blacks/African Americans accounted for 42% of new HIV diagnoses and 13% of the population.i
  • Hispanics/Latinos accounted for 27% of new HIV diagnoses and 18% of the population.i

New HIV Diagnoses in the US and Dependent Areas by Race/Ethnicity, 2018

This pie chart shows HIV diagnoses in the United States and dependent areas in 2018 by race. Blacks/African Americans made up 42% of new HIV diagnoses, Hispanics/Latinos made up 27%, whites made up 25%, Asians made up 2%, multiple races made up 2%, American Indians/Alaska Natives made up less than 1%, and Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders made up less than 1% of new HIV diagnoses.

Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
Source: CDC. Diagnoses of HIV infection in the United States and dependent areas, 2018pdf icon. HIV Surveillance Report 2019;30.

HIV Diagnoses in the 50 States and District of Columbia by Race/Ethnicity, 2010-2017

This trend chart shows HIV diagnoses by race/ethnicity in 50 states and the District of Columbia from 2010 to 2016. HIV diagnoses among Blacks/African Americans decreased 13%; Hispanics/Latinos increased 6%; whites decreased 13%; Asians increased 43%; multiple races decreased 38%; American Indians/Alaska Natives increased 45%; and Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders decreased 11%.

There were large increases/decreases in populations with fewer diagnoses.
Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
Source: CDC. NCHHSTP AtlasPlus. Accessed December 18, 2019.

By Region

HIV diagnoses are not evenly distributed regionally in the US. In 2018, the population rates (per 100,000 people) of people who received an HIV diagnosis were highest in the South (15.7), followed by the US dependent areas (12.7), the Northeast (10.0), the West (9.3), and the Midwest (7.2).j

Living With HIV

Adults and Adolescents With HIV in the 50 States and District of Columbia

This infographic shows the continuum of care data for adults and adolescents with HIV. At the end of 2016, an estimated 1.1 million people had HIV. 6 in 7 knew they had the virus. For every 100 people with HIV in 2016, 64 received some HIV care, 49 were retained in care, and 53 were virally suppressed. A person with HIV who takes HIV medicine as prescribed and gets and stays virally suppressed or undetectable can stay healthy and has effectively no risk of sexually transmitting HIV to HIV-negative partners.

* Includes diagnosed and undiagnosed HIV infections.
† Had 2 viral load or CD4 tests at least 3 months apart in a year.
‡ Based on most recent viral load test.

Source: CDC. Estimated HIV incidence and prevalence in the United States 2010–2016pdf icon. HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2019;24(1).
Source: CDC. Selected national HIV prevention and care outcomes (slides)pdf icon. Accessed October 29, 2019.

Deaths

In 2017, there were 16,350 deaths among adults and adolescents with diagnosed HIV in the US. These deaths may be due to any cause.


a HIV diagnoses refers to the number of people who received an HIV diagnosis during a given time period, not when the people got HIV infection.
b Unless otherwise noted, the term United States (US) includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the 6 dependent areas of American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, the Republic of Palau, and the US Virgin Islands.
c The term male-to-male sexual contact is used in CDC surveillance systems. It indicates a behavior that transmits HIV infection, not how individuals self-identify in terms of their sexuality. This fact sheet uses the term gay and bisexual men.
d Includes infections attributed to male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use (men who reported both risk factors).
e Does not include heterosexuals who reported injection drug use.
f Does not include infections attributed to male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use (men who reported both risk factors).
g Black refers to people having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa, including immigrants from the Caribbean, and South and Latin America. African American is a term often used for Americans of African descent with ancestry in North America. Individuals may self-identify as either, both, or choose another identity altogether.
h Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
i The US Census Bureau’s population estimates include the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.
j Regions defined by the US Census Bureau and used in CDC’s National HIV Surveillance System:
Northeast: CT, ME, MA, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VT
Midwest: IL, IN, IA, KS, MI, MN, MO, NE, ND, OH, SD, WI
South: AL, AR, DE, DC, FL, GA, KY, LA, MD, MS, NC, OK, SC, TN, TX, VA, WV
West: AK, AZ, CA, CO, HI, ID, MT, NV, NM, OR, UT, WA, WY

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