Statistics Overview

HIV Surveillance Report

HIV surveillance reports disseminate data about HIV and AIDS—for example, the number and population rates of HIV diagnoses, the number of people with HIV, and the number of people receiving HIV medical care.

Unless otherwise noted, the following data are from CDC’s HIV Surveillance Report: Diagnoses of HIV Infection in the United States and Dependent Areas, 2019; vol. 32.

  • Diagnosis of HIV infection: The term refers to people diagnosed with HIV infection, regardless of the stage of disease at diagnosis (stage 0, 1, 2, 3 [AIDS], or unknown), from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and 6 dependent areas (American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, the Republic of Palau, and the US Virgin Islands).
  • HIV infection, stage 3 (AIDS): The term refers specifically to people with diagnosed HIV whose infection was classified as stage 3 (AIDS) during a given year (for diagnoses) or whose infection has ever been classified as stage 3 (AIDS) (for prevalence and deaths).
  • Transmission category: The term for summarizing the multiple risk factors that a person may have has by selecting the one most likely to have resulted in HIV transmission. For surveillance purposes, people with more than one reported risk factor are classified in the transmission category listed first in a hierarchy of transmission categories, and therefore counted only once. The exception is men who had sexual contact with other men and injected drugs; this group makes up a separate transmission category.
  • HIV prevalence estimate: The number of people with HIV at a given time regardless of the time of infection, whether the person has received a diagnosis (aware of infection), or the stage of HIV disease.

For more definitions and details about how HIV and AIDS data are tabulated, read the Technical Notes from the HIV Surveillance Report: Diagnoses of HIV Infection in the United States and Dependent Areas, 2019; vol. 32.

At the end of 2019, an estimated 1,189,700 million people aged 13 and older had HIV in the United States,a including an estimated 158,500 (13%) people whose infections had not been diagnosed.b

a In 50 states and the District of Columbia.
b CDC. Estimated HIV incidence and prevalence in the United States 2015–2019. HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2021;26(1).

In 2019, 36,801 people received an HIV diagnosis in the United States (US) and dependent areas.a

a American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, the Republic of Palau, and the US Virgin Islands.

New HIV Diagnoses in the
US and Dependent Areasa by Age at Diagnosis, 2019

New HIV Diagnoses in the
US and Dependent Areasa by Age at Diagnosis, 2018
Age (Years) Number of Diagnoses
13-14 21
15-19 1,646
20-24 5,981
25-29 7,396
30-34  5,731
35-39 4,143
40-44 3,004
45-49 2,602
50-54 2,329
55-59 1,863
60-64 1,123
65 and older 901

a American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, the Republic of Palau, and the US Virgin Islands.

CDC tracks HIV diagnoses among seven racial and ethnic groups: American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander, White, and multiracial people.

New HIV Diagnoses Among Adults and Adolescents in the
US and Dependent Areasa by Race/Ethnicity, 2019

New HIV Diagnoses Among Adults and Adolescents in the US and Dependent Areasa by Race/Ethnicity, 2018
Race or Ethnicity Number of Diagnoses
American Indian/Alaska Native 210
Asian 743
Black/African Americanb 15,340
Hispanic/Latinoc 10,502
Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander 70
White 9,018
Multiracial 918

a American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, the Republic of Palau, and the US Virgin Islands.
b Black refers to people having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. African American is a term often used for Americans of African descent with ancestry in North America.
c Hispanic/Latino people can be of any race.

For more details on HIV infection and race/ethnicity, see CDC’s populations and surveillance fact sheets.

CDC classifies HIV diagnoses into six transmission categories to which transmission may be attributed: male-to-male sexual contact, injection drug use, male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use, heterosexual contact, mother-to-child (perinatal) transmission, and other (includes blood transfusions and unknown cause).

New HIV Diagnoses Among Adults and Adolescents in the
US and Dependent Areasa by Transmission Category, 2019

New HIV Diagnoses Among Adults and Adolescents in the US and Dependent Areasa by Transmission Category, 2018
Transmission Category Males Females Total
Male-to-male sexual contact 24,084 NA 24,084
Injection drug use 1,397 1,111 2,508
Male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug useb 1,468 NA 1,468
Heterosexual contactc 2,754 5,863 8,617
Perinatald 14 21 35
Othere 23 5 28

a American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, the Republic of Palau, and the US Virgin Islands.
b Includes infections attributed to male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use (men who reported both risk factors).
c Heterosexual contact with a person known to have, or with a risk factor for, HIV infection.
d People aged 13 and over at the time of diagnosis.
e Includes hemophilia, blood transfusion, perinatal exposure, and risk factor not reported or not identified.

New HIV Diagnoses Among Children Younger Than 13 Years at the Time of Diagnosis in the US and Dependent Areas by Transmission Category, 2019

New HIV Diagnoses Among Children Younger Than 13 Years at the Time of Diagnosis in the US and Dependent Areas by Transmission Category, 2018
Transmission Category Number of Diagnoses
Perinatal 49
Othera 12

a Includes hemophilia, blood transfusion, and risk factor not reported or not identified.

New HIV Diagnoses Among Adults and Adolescents by Top 10 States, 2019

New HIV Diagnoses Among Adults and Adolescents by Top 10 States, 2018
State Number of Diagnoses
Florida 4,378
California 4,354
Texas 4,302
Georgia 2,439
New York 2,330
North Carolina 1,365
Illinois 1,252
New Jersey 1,057
Pennsylvania 989
Ohio 980

At the end of 2019, there were 1,059,784 adults and adolescents with diagnosed HIV in the US and dependent areas.a

Because of delays in reporting of deaths, prevalence data are only available through the end of 2019. The exclusion of data from the most recent year allows at least 12 months for deaths to be reported and for these deaths to be factored into calculations of prevalence.

a American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, the Republic of Palau, and the US Virgin Islands.

In 2019, there were 15,815 deaths among adults and adolescents with diagnosed HIV in the US and dependent areas.a These deaths could be from any cause.

a American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, the Republic of Palau, and the US Virgin Islands.

  • NCHHSTP AtlasPlus allows users to analyze more than 15 years of HIV, STD, viral hepatitis, and tuberculosis (TB) data at national, state, and county levels. AtlasPlus also provides access to indicators on PrEP coverage and social determinants of health. Users can create and export custom maps, tables, and charts, explore data by population groups, and look at trends.
  • NCHHSTP State Profiles presents an overview of the burden of HIV/AIDS, viral hepatitis, STDs, and TB in the United States, each of the 50 states, and Washington, D.C. The profiles present the latest nationally representative data, as well as information about prevention and control programs that CDC supports nationally and in each state.
  • Statehealthfacts.orgexternal iconprovides state-by-state information about new and cumulative AIDS diagnoses, AIDS diagnosis rates, people with an AIDS diagnosis, AIDS deaths, HIV diagnoses, HIV testing statistics and policies, additional AIDS-related state policies, Ryan White funding and other funding for HIV prevention, and AIDS Drug Assistance Programs, including budget, client, and expenditure data from the Kaiser Family Foundation.

HIV continues to be a serious health issue for parts of the world. Worldwide, there were about 1.7 million new cases of HIV in 2019. About 38 million people were living with HIV around the world in 2019. An estimated 690,000 people died from AIDS-related illnesses in 2019. An estimated 33 million people have died from AIDS-related illnesses since the start of the epidemic. Eastern and Southern Africa is the region most affected by HIV worldwide, and accounts for about 43% of all new HIV infections. Other regions significantly affected by HIV include Asia and the Pacific, Western and Central Africa, Western and Central Europe and North America, and Latin America.

CDC’s Global HIV and TB website explains what CDC is doing in the global response to HIV.

Other resources for international HIV statistics: