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Surveillance for Certain Health Behaviors Among States and Selected Local Areas --- United States, 2008

Elizabeth Hughes, DrPH1, Greta Kilmer, MS2,

Yan Li, MPH3, Balarami Valluru, MS3,

Julie Brown4, Gloria Colclough4,

Sonya Geathers, MA4, Henry Roberts, PhD1,

Laurie Elam-Evans, PhD4, Lina Balluz, ScD4

1Division of Viral Hepatitis, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention

2RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC

3Georgia Department of Community Health, Atlanta, GA

4Division of Behavioral Surveillance, Public Health Surveillance Program Office, Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services


Corresponding Author: Lina Balluz, ScD, MPH, Division of Behavioral Surveillance, Public Health Surveillance Program Office (PHSPO), Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services (OSELS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,

2500 Century Parkway, Mailstop E-97, Atlanta, Georgia 30345. Telephone: (404) 498-0496; Fax: (404) 498-0595; E-mail: lballuz@cdc.gov



Abstract

Problem: Chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes, cancer, heart disease, and stroke) are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Data on health risk behaviors that increase the risk for chronic diseases and use of preventive practices are essential for the development, implementation, and evaluation of health promotion programs, policies, and intervention strategies to decrease or prevent the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Surveillance data from states and territories, selected metropolitan and micropolitan areas, and counties are vital components of these various prevention and intervention strategies.

Reporting Period: January--December 2008

Description of the System: The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is an ongoing, state-based, random-digit--dialed telephone survey of noninstitutionalized adults residing in the United States. BRFSS collects data on health risk behaviors, preventive health services and practices, and access to health care related to the leading causes of death and disability in the United States. This report presents results for 2008 for all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, 177 metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas (MMSAs), and 266 counties.

Results: In 2008, the estimated prevalence of high-risk behaviors, chronic diseases and conditions, screening practices, and use of preventive health-care services varied substantially by state and territory, MMSA, and county. The following is a summary of results listed by BRFSS question topic. Each set of proportions refers to the range of estimated prevalence for the disease, condition, or behavior as reported by the survey respondent. Adults reporting good or better health: 68% to 89% for states and territories and 69% to 93% for selected MMSAs and counties. Health care insurance coverage: 72% to 96% for states and territories, 61% to 97% for MMSAs, and 61% to 98% for counties. Teeth extractions among persons aged ≥65 years: 10% to 38% for states and territories, 5% to 36% for MMSAs, and 4% to 34% for counties. Adults who had a checkup during the preceding 12 months: 56% to 81% for states and territories, 51% to 85% for MMSAs, and 51% to 89% for counties. Influenza vaccination among persons aged ≥65 years: 31% to 78% for states and territories, 52% to 82% for MMSAs, and 51% to 86% for counties. Pneumococcal vaccination among persons aged ≥65 years: 28% to 73% for states and territories, 46% to 82% for MMSAs, and 41% to 83% for counties. Adults aged ≥50 years who had a sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy: 38% to 74% for states and territories, 45% to 78% for selected MMSAs, and 45% to 80% for counties. Adults aged ≥50 years who had a blood stool test during the preceding 2 years: 8% to 29% for states and territories, 7% to 51% for MMSAs, and 7% to 40% for counties. Among women aged ≥18 years who had a Papanicolaou test during the preceding 3 years: 67% to 89% for states and territories, 66% to 93% for selected MMSAs, and 66% to 96% for counties. Women aged ≥40 years who had a mammogram during the preceding 2 years: 64% to 85% for states and territories, and 61% to 88% for MMSAs and counties. Men aged ≥40 years who had a Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) test during the preceding 2 years: 34% to 66% for states and territories, 39% to 70% for MMSAs, and 37% to 71% for counties. Current cigarette smoking among adults aged ≥18 years: 6% to 27% for states and territories, 5% to 31% for MMSAs, and 5% to 30% for counties. Adults who reported binge drinking during the preceding month: 8% to 23% for states and territories, 3% to 25% for selected MMSAs, and 3% to 26% for counties. Heavy drinking among adults during the preceding month: 3% to 8% for states and territories, <1% to 10% for MMSAs, and 1% to 11% for counties. Adults who reported no leisure-time physical activity: 18% to 47% for states and territories, 12% to 40% for MMSAs, and 10% to 40% for selected counties. Adults who were overweight (BMI ≥25.0 and <30.0): 33% to 40% for states and territories, 31% to 46% for selected MMSAs, and 28% to 50% for counties. Adults aged ≥20 years who were obese (BMI ≥30.0): 20% to 34% for states and territories, 15% to 40% for MMSAs, and 13% to 40% for counties. Asthma among adults: 5% to 11% for states and territories, 4% to 13% for MMSAs, and 4% to 15% for counties. Diabetes among adults: 6% to 12% for states and territories, 3% to 17% for selected MMSAs, and 3% to 14% for counties. Adults aged ≥18 years who had limited activity because of physical, mental, or emotional problems: 10% to 30% for states and territories, 13% to 33% for MMSAs, and 12% to 31% for counties. Adults who required use of special equipment: 4% to 11% for states and territories, 3% to 12% for MMSAs, and 2% to 13% for counties. Angina and coronary heart disease among adults aged ≥45 years: 5% to 19% for states and territories, 6% to 22% for MMSAs, and 4% to 22% for counties. Adults aged ≥45 years with a history of stroke: 3% to 7% for states and territories, 2% to 11% for selected MMSAs, and 1% to 12% for counties.

Interpretation: The findings in this report indicate substantial variation in health-risk behaviors, chronic diseases and conditions, and use of preventive health-care services among U.S. adults at the state and territory, MMSA, and county level. The findings underscore the continued need for surveillance of health-risk behaviors, chronic diseases and conditions, and the use of preventive health services.

Public Health Action: Healthy People 2010 objectives have been established to monitor health behaviors and the use of preventive health services. Local and state health departments and federal agencies use BRFSS data to identify populations at high risk for certain health behaviors, chronic diseases and conditions, and to evaluate the use of preventive services. In addition, BRFSS data are used to direct, implement, monitor, and evaluate public health programs and policies that can lead to a reduction in morbidity and mortality from adverse effects of health-risk behaviors and subsequent chronic conditions.

Introduction

Chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes, heart disease, cancer, stroke, and arthritis) are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality (1) and are among the most common, costly, and preventable health problems in the United States (2). Each year, seven of 10 deaths are the result of chronic diseases (2).

Comprehensive disease surveillance is essential for identifying health issues and disparities, developing prevention programs and strategies, and tracking health indicators of at-risk populations (3). The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), conducted by state health departments with assistance from CDC, is the largest state-based surveillance system in the United States and the world's largest continuously collected cross-sectional telephone survey (4). Because of its substantial sample size, prevalence estimates also are available for selected metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas (MMSAs) and their counties. BRFSS collects identifiable, comparable, state-specific data on preventive health practices related to cancer, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and risk behaviors (e.g., cigarette smoking, poor nutritional habits, and a lack of adequate physical activity) that are linked to chronic diseases, injuries, and preventable infectious diseases that affect the adult U.S. population. Since 1984, BRFSS has been the main source of health information on at-risk behaviors, chronic disease conditions, emerging health issues, and use of preventive health services (4). BRFSS is conducted in all 50 states, the District of Columbia (DC), Puerto Rico, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) sets and monitors national objectives for promoting health and preventing disease. These objectives necessitate collaborations across various entities to guide informed decision-making and measure the impact of prevention activities (5). This report contains comparisons between 2008 BRFSS data and certain HP 2010 objectives.

Methods

BRFSS uses a multistage design based on random-digit--dialing to select a representative sample of the noninstitutionalized civilian population aged ≥18 years. This report includes data from states and territories, selected MMSAs, and counties in the 50 states, DC, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. To produce stable prevalence estimates, statistics for selected MMSAs and counties were not reported if the denominator was <50 or the 95% confidence interval (CI) half-width was >10. In 2008, a total of 177 MMSAs and 266 counties had sufficient sample size (≥500 respondents or ≥19 respondents per final weighting class) to be reported. Weighting classes were based on cross-classification totals of age and sex or age and sex and race. Counties with an estimated population of <10,000 persons were excluded. In 2008, a total of 414,509 interviews were completed. Responses coded as "do not know" or "refused" were excluded from the analyses. Details on methodology, random sampling design and procedures, and reliability and validity of measures used in BRFSS have been described in previous publications (6,7).

Questionnaire

The BRFSS questionnaire includes questions regarding personal behaviors that increase the risk for one or more of the 10 leading causes of mortality in the United States. The questionnaire consists of three components: 1) core questions, 2) optional modules, and 3) state-added questions. Core questions are standardized and are asked of all study respondents in each state and territory. Optional modules are composed of standardized questions that address specific health-related topics relevant to at-risk health behaviors and health-related conditions. Each state and territory has the option to include these modules in the survey. State-added questions consist of questions developed for and used by states and territories to address state-specific health concerns. The 2008 BRFSS core survey incorporated questions that addressed demographics, health status, health care access, health-related quality of life, sleep behavior, exercise, diabetes, oral health, cardiovascular disease prevalence, asthma, disability, tobacco use, alcohol consumption, immunization (adult influenza and pneumococcal vaccination), falls, seatbelt use, drinking and driving, women's health issues, prostate cancer screening, colorectal cancer screening, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), emotional support, and life satisfaction.

In 2008, states and territories selected the following optional modules which addressed health issues and concerns: childhood asthma prevalence (50 states), diabetes (48), prediabetes (34), other tobacco products (14), binge drinking (11), secondhand smoke (10), anxiety and depression (eight), child human papillomavirus (HPV) (eight), visual impairment and access to eye care (eight), adult asthma history (seven), adult HPV (five), influenza---high risk/health-care worker (four), reactions to race (four), general preparedness (two), healthy days---symptoms (two), and veteran health status (two).

This report focuses on 1) health status indicators (health status, health-care coverage, and oral health), 2) preventive practices (routine checkup and influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations for persons aged ≥65 years), 3) cancer prevention (sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy, blood stool test, Papanicolaou [Pap] test, mammogram, and prostate-specific antigen test [PSA]), 4) health risk behaviors (current cigarette smoking, binge heavy drinking, and no leisure-time physical activity), 5) chronic conditions and disability (overweight and obesity, asthma, diabetes, limited activity, and use of special equipment), and 6) cardiovascular disease (coronary heart disease and stroke). The 2008 BRFSS questionnaire and all other annual surveys are available at http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/questionnaires/english.htm.

Data Collection and Processing

BRFSS data are collected monthly by each state and territory. Trained interviewers use a computer-assisted telephone interviewing system to administer the survey. After interviews are conducted, data are submitted to CDC for editing, processing, weighting, reliability checks, and analyses. In 2008, all states, DC, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands participated in BRFSS.

Data Weighting and Statistical Analysis

At the end of the survey year, CDC edits and aggregates the monthly data files to create yearly samples for each state and territory. Each sample is weighted to the respondent's probability of selection and to the age-, sex-, and sometimes race-specific distribution of the population in each state and territory. State level weights are adjusted to produce MMSA- and county-level weights. These sampling weights are used to generate BRFSS state, MMSA, and county-level prevalence estimates. Detailed weighting and analytic methodologies have been documented elsewhere (6,7).

To account for the complex sampling design, CDC used SAS-callable SUDAAN statistical software to execute these analyses (8,9). In 2008, the number of interviews completed ranged from 796 in Guam to 22,532 in Washington (median: 6,468). Response rates* ranged from 35.8% in Maryland to 83.7% in Guam (median: 53.4%), and cooperation rates ranged from 59.3% in California to 87.8% in Kentucky (median: 75.0%) based on Council of American Survey and Research Organizations guidelines (10).

The Office of Management and Budget has the oversight to define MMSAs (11). BRFSS respondents are assigned to a particular MMSA dependent on their respective Federal Information Processing Standard county code. National prevalence estimates used to monitor progress towards achieving health promotion and disease prevention were produced from aggregated specific state data. Counties within the selected MMSAs for which stable estimates were available also are listed. Counties with an estimated population of <10,000 persons were excluded.

Results

Health Status Indicators

Health Status

Respondents were asked to rate their general health as excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor. Respondents were classified into two groups: those who reported fair or poor health and those who reported good, very good, or excellent health. In 2008, the estimated prevalence of self-reported good or better health among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 67.8% in Puerto Rico to 89.3% in Utah (median: 85.0%) (Table 1). Among selected MMSAs, the self-reported estimated prevalence of good or better health ranged from 68.5% in El Paso, Texas, to 92.8% in Bozeman, Montana (median: 85.9%) (Table 2). For selected counties, the estimated prevalence of good or better health ranged from 68.5% in El Paso County, Texas, to 93.2% in Douglas County, Colorado (median: 86.2%) (Table 3).

Health-Care Coverage

Health-care coverage was defined as respondents having reported that they had private health insurance (e.g., health maintenance organizations) or government health plans (e.g., Medicare or Medicaid). In 2008, the estimated prevalence of adults who had health-care coverage ranged from 72.4% in the U.S. Virgin Islands to 95.6% in Massachusetts (median: 85.5%) (Table 4). Among MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 60.5% in El Paso, Texas, to 96.9% in Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts (median: 86.9%) (Table 5). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 60.5% in El Paso County, Texas, to 97.9% in Plymouth County, Massachusetts (median: 87.9%) (Table 6).

Oral Health-Teeth Extraction

Oral health status was assessed by asking adults aged ≥65 years, "How many of your permanent teeth have been removed because of tooth decay or gum disease?" In 2008, the estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who had all of their natural teeth extracted ranged from 9.6% in Hawaii to 37.8% in West Virginia (median: 18.5%) (Table 7). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 5.2% in Bethesda-Frederick-Gaithersburg, Maryland, to 36.3% in Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio (median: 16.9%) (Table 8). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 4.2% in Montgomery County, Maryland, to 34.2% in Fayette County, Pennsylvania (median: 15.6%) (Table 9).

Preventive Practices

Recent Routine Checkup

A routine checkup is defined as a general physical examination, not an examination for a specific injury, illness, or condition. Respondents were classified as having a recent routine checkup if they reported visiting a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months. In 2008, the estimated prevalence of persons aged ≥18 years who had a recent routine checkup ranged from 55.5% in Utah to 80.7% in Delaware (median: 67.4%) (Table 10). Among MMSAs, the prevalence ranged from 50.9% in Provo-Orem, Utah, to 85.0% in Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana (median: 67.4%) (Table 11). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 51.4% in Utah County, Utah, to 88.6% in Caddo Parish, Louisiana (median: 68.6%) (Table 12).

Influenza Vaccination

In 2008, the state-specific estimated prevalence among adults aged ≥65 years who had received an influenza vaccination during the preceding 12 months ranged from 30.6% in Puerto Rico to 78.1% in New Hampshire (median: 70.9%) (Table 13). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 52.1% in Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, Florida, to 82.4% in Rochester, New York (median 72.1%) (Table 14). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 51.3% in Kings County, New York, to 85.8% in Westchester County, New York to (median: 72.7%) (Table 15).

Pneumococcal Vaccination

The estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who ever had a pneumococcal vaccination ranged from 28.4% in Puerto Rico to 73.0% in New Hampshire (median: 66.9%) (Table 16). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 45.6% in Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida, to 81.8% in Bangor, Maine (median: 67.8%) (Table 17). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 40.7% in Hudson County, New Jersey, to 83.2% in Anoka County, Minnesota (median: 69.2%) (Table 18).

Cancer Prevention

Sigmoidoscopy or Colonoscopy

In 2008, the estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥50 years who ever had a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy ranged from 38.3% in Guam to 74.3% in Delaware (median: 61.8%) (Table 19). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 44.7% in Norfolk, Nebraska, to 77.9% in Barre, Vermont (median: 64.0%) (Table 20). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 45.0% in Madison County, Nebraska, to 80.1% in Sagadahoc County, Maine (median: 65.0%) (Table 21).

Blood Stool Test

The estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥50 years who had a blood stool test during the preceding 2 years ranged from 7.5% in Puerto Rico to 29.0% in Florida (median 20.9%) (Table 22). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 7.1% in Provo-Orem, Utah, to 50.7% in Tallahassee, Florida (median: 22.1%) (Table 23). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 6.5% in Davis County, Utah, to 39.9% in Santa Clara County, California (median: 21.7%) (Table 24).

Pap Test

In 2008, the estimated prevalence of women aged ≥18 years who had a Pap test during the preceding 3 years ranged from 66.6% in Guam to 88.9% in DC (median: 82.8%) (Table 25). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 65.7% in Provo-Orem, Utah, to 93.2% in Tallahassee, Florida (median: 84.3%) (Table 26). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 65.8% in Utah County, Utah, to 96.1% in DeKalb County, Georgia (median: 85.3%) (Table 27).

Mammogram

In 2008, the state-specific estimated prevalence for women aged ≥40 years who had a mammogram during the preceding 2 years ranged from 63.8% in Guam to 84.9% in Massachusetts (median: 76.0%) (Table 28). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 61.1% in Rock Springs, Wyoming, to 88.0% in Barnstable Town, Massachusetts (median: 77.4%) (Table 29). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 61.1% in Sweetwater County, Wyoming, to 88.0% in Barnstable, Massachusetts (median: 78.1%) (Table 30).

PSA Test

The PSA is a blood test that measures the level of prostate-specific antigen, an enzyme only produced by the prostate gland. High levels of PSA in the blood can indicate the development of early-stage cancer. PSA tests can be used as diagnostic tests to determine any change in cell growth from previous tests. In 2008, the estimated prevalence of men aged ≥40 years who had a PSA test during the preceding 2 years ranged from 34.1% in Guam to 65.6% in Puerto Rico (median: 54.8%) (Table 31). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 38.9% in San Francisco-San Mateo-Redwood City, California, to 70.1% in Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina (median: 56.2%) (Table 32). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 37.3% in Dakota County, Nebraska, to 70.6% in Wake County, North Carolina (median: 56.0%) (Table 33).

Health Risk Behaviors

Current Cigarette Smoking

Respondents were classified as current smokers if they reported having smoked at least 100 cigarettes during their lifetime and indicated that they smoked every day or some days at the time of the survey. The estimated prevalence of current cigarette smoking among adults ≥18 years of age in the United States, ranged from 6.4% in the U.S. Virgin Islands to 27.4% in Guam (median: 18.3%) (Table 34). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 4.9% in Provo-Orem, Utah, to 30.9% in Wichita Falls, Texas (median: 18.4%) (Table 35). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 4.7% in Utah County, Utah, to 30.3% in St. Louis City, Missouri (median: 17.7%) (Table 36).

Binge Drinking

Binge drinking was defined as men aged ≥18 years having five or more drinks, and women aged ≥18 years having four or more drinks on at least one occasion during the preceding month. In 2008, the estimated prevalence of binge drinking among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 8.2% in Utah to 22.8% in Wisconsin (median: 15.5%) (Table 37). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 2.9% in Provo Orem, Utah, to 25.1% in Norfolk, Nebraska (median: 15.2%) (Table 38). Among counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 2.9% in Utah County, Utah, to 25.8% in Pinal County, Arizona (median: 15.4%) (Table 39).

Heavy Drinking

Heavy drinking was defined as men aged ≥18 years having more than two drinks and women aged ≥18 years having more than one drink per day during the preceding month. In 2008, the prevalence of heavy drinking among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 2.9% in Oklahoma and West Virginia to 8.2% in Nevada (median: 5.1%) (Table 40). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 0.6% in Provo Orem, Utah, to 9.8% in Barnstable Town, Massachusetts (median: 5.2%) (Table 41). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 1.4% in Laurens County, South Carolina, to 11.3% in Newport County, Rhode Island (median: 5.3%) (Table 42).

No Leisure-Time Physical Activity

No leisure-time physical activity was defined by the respondent's indication of no participation in exercise (e.g., running, calisthenics, golf, gardening, or walking for exercise) other than their regular job during the preceding month. In 2008, the estimated prevalence of physical inactivity among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 18.1% in Minnesota to 47.3% in Puerto Rico (median: 24.8%) (Table 43). Among MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 12.3% in Boulder, Colorado, to 40.1% in Wichita Falls, Texas (median: 24.0%) (Table 44). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 9.8% in Douglas County, Colorado, to 40.3% in Hinds County, Mississippi (median: 23.0%) (Table 45).

Chronic Conditions and Disabilities

Overweight and Obesity

Self-reported weight and height were used to calculate body mass index (BMI) (weight [kg]/height [m2]). Respondents were categorized as being overweight if they had a BMI ≥25.0 and <30.0. In 2008, the estimated prevalence of being overweight among persons aged ≥18 years ranged from 32.8% in DC to 39.6% in North Dakota (median: 36.6%) (Table 46). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 31.2% in Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana, to 45.7% in Montgomery, Alabama (median: 36.4%) (Table 47). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 28.0% in New York County, New York, to 49.7% in Bristol County, Rhode Island (median: 36.7%) (Table 48).

Respondents were classified as obese if their BMI was ≥30.0. Obesity analyses were restricted to adults aged ≥20 years to permit comparison with HP 2010 objectives. In 2008, the estimated prevalence of obesity ranged from 19.9% in Colorado to 34.0% in Mississippi (median: 27.3%) (Table 49). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 15.3% in Boulder, Colorado, to 39.9% in Orangeburg, South Carolina (median: 27.0%) (Table 50). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 12.9% in Summit County, Utah, to 39.9% in Orangeburg County, South Carolina (median: 26.0%) (Table 51).

Current Asthma

Respondents were defined as currently having asthma if they reported having ever been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health-care professional that they had asthma and still had it during the survey. In 2008, the estimated prevalence of current asthma among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 4.5% in the U.S. Virgin Islands and Guam to 10.6% in Rhode Island (median: 8.8%) (Table 52). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 3.6% in Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota, to 13.2% in Rochester, New York (median: 8.8%) (Table 53). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 3.8% in Westchester County, New York and Wake County, North Carolina, to 14.9% in Monroe County, New York (median: 8.7%) (Table 54).

Diabetes

Respondents were classified as having diabetes if they reported ever being told by a doctor that they have diabetes. For this report, gestational diabetes, prediabetes, or borderline diabetes in adults were not included in the estimates. In 2008, the estimated prevalence of diabetes ranged from 5.9% in Minnesota to 12.4% in Puerto Rico (median: 8.3%) (Table 55). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 2.8% in Bozeman, Montana, to 16.7% in Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio (median: 8.0%) (Table 56). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 2.7% in Summit County, Utah, to 13.8% in Jefferson County, Alabama, and Jefferson Parish, Louisiana (median: 7.8%) (Table 57).

Limited Activity

Estimated prevalence for respondents who reported limitation of activity in any way because of physical, mental, or emotional problems ranged from 9.8% in the U.S. Virgin Islands to 29.5% in West Virginia (median: 20.4%) (Table 58). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 12.8% in Norfolk, Nebraska, to 32.6% in Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio (median: 20.2%) (Table 59). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 11.7% in Summit County, Utah, to 30.7% in Kitsap County, Washington (median: 20.0%) (Table 60).

Use of Special Equipment

Respondents were asked if they required use of equipment (e.g., cane, wheelchair, special bed, or special telephone) because of health problems. The estimated prevalence of persons requiring use of special equipment ranged from 4.0% in the U.S. Virgin Islands to 10.9% in West Virginia (median: 7.2%) (Table 61). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 2.9% in San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California, to 12.3% in Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio (median: 7.0%) (Table 62). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 2.4% in Douglas County, Colorado, to 13.1% in Wyandotte County, Kansas (median: 6.9%) (Table 63).

Cardiovascular Diseases

Coronary Heart Disease

Respondents were classified as having coronary heart disease (CHD) if they had ever been told by a doctor that they had CHD, including heart attack or angina. CHD analyses were restricted to adults aged ≥45 years. The estimated prevalence among adults ranged from 5.1% in the U.S. Virgin Islands to 19.4% in West Virginia (median: 11.3%) (Table 64). Among MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 5.6% in Boulder, Colorado and Fort Collins-Loveland, Colorado, to 21.9% in Wichita Falls, Texas (median: 11.0%) (Table 65). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 4.3% in Douglas County, Colorado, to 21.6% in Kanawha County, West Virginia (median: 10.9%) (Table 66).

Stroke

Respondents were classified as having a history of stroke if they reported having ever been told by a doctor that they had a stroke. Stroke analyses were restricted to adults aged ≥45 years. In 2008, the estimated prevalence of stroke among adults ranged from 3.2% in Vermont to 7.1% in West Virginia (median: 4.5%) (Table 67). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 1.5% in Bozeman, Montana, to 10.5% in Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio (median: 4.1%) (Table 68). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 1.4% in DeKalb County, Georgia, to 11.5% in Wichita County, Texas (median: 4.1%) (Table 69).

Discussion

The findings in this report indicate that substantial variations exist in the estimated prevalence of health-risk behaviors, chronic diseases, and use of preventive health screening practices among U.S. adults at the state and territory, MMSA, and county level. State-specific BRFSS estimates are a major tool used by policymakers, public health officials, community stakeholders, and activists to identify local health burdens and needs and to assist in planning, directing, implementing, and monitoring the effectiveness of intervention and prevention strategies.

These variations might reflect differences in demographic and socioeconomic composition of the study populations; availability of, access to, and use of health-care services; state laws or local ordinances; use of preventive health screenings; and the subsequent reimbursement of preventive services by insurance providers. Prevalence estimates are derived from direct estimates for states and territories, MMSAs, and counties. The estimates for smaller geographic units (i.e., MMSA and county) might vary from estimates in other reports where different methods were used (e.g., Bayesian statistical methods) to produce local area estimates.

Health Status Indicators

Health Status

Self-reported health status is a multidimensional construct that incorporates health behaviors, physical manifestations of health conditions, activity limitations, and psychological indicators (12). Poor self-assessed health is associated with increased risk for mortality, even after controlling for other more objective measures of health status (13). For this report, self-assessed health status was reported for good or better health. In 2008, the proportion of adults who reported good or better health varied across states and territories, MMSAs, and counties. These variations suggest differences in the underlying aspects of the measure, which might reflect differences in the etiology and severity of specific diseases and illnesses, disparities in access to adequate medical care, or access to treatment for underlying medical conditions.

Health-Care Coverage

During the preceding 25 years, health services research has identified having no health insurance as a risk indicator for decreased overall health status, exacerbation of chronic disease indicators, and access to health care (14,15). The HP 2010 objective for health insurance coverage is 100% (objective no. 1-1). In 2008, no state and territory, MMSA, or county achieved the 100% health insurance coverage goal (Table 70).

Oral Health

Loss of natural teeth impacts self-esteem, chewing ability, difficulty with relaxation, pain and distress, socialization, and other measures of quality of life (16). Extraction of all natural teeth represents an endpoint influenced by the incidence of dental caries or periodontal disease earlier in life (17). Socioeconomic disparities play a substantial role in periodontal disease and teeth extraction (18). The HP 2010 objective is to reduce to <22% the proportion of adults aged ≥65 years who have lost or had all of their natural teeth extracted (objective no. 21-4). In 2008, 79% of states and territories, 84% of MMSAs, and 87% of counties achieved the HP 2010 target (Table 70).

Preventive Practices

Routine Checkup

Routine health screenings can minimize outcomes related to illness and disability and reduce health-care costs. Early detection of chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes, heart disease, and cancer) can substantially lower the risk for complications and provide opportunities for intervention of at-risk lifestyle behaviors before conditions exacerbate (19).

Pneumococcal and Influenza Vaccination

Pneumonia and influenza are leading causes of morbidity and mortality among persons aged ≥65 years (20) and the fifth-leading causes of death among the elderly in the United States (21). Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination can effectively reduce the negative health effects from these diseases (21--23). During 1986--2006, there has been a steady increase in self-reported influenza and pneumococcal vaccination among persons aged ≥65 years (24). The HP 2010 objectives are to increase to 90% the proportion of adults aged ≥65 years who are vaccinated for influenza and pneumococcal disease (objectives no. 14-29a and14-29b). In 2008, no state and territory, MMSA, or county achieved the objective for influenza vaccination or pneumococcal vaccination (Table 70).

Cancer Prevention

Colorectal Cancer Screening

Cancer is the second-leading cause of death in the United States. Colorectal cancer, one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers, is the second-leading cause of cancer mortality. In 2006§, a total of 139,127 persons were diagnosed with colorectal cancer resulting in 53,196 deaths (25). Colorectal cancer usually begins from polyps present in the rectum or colon. Although it affects both men and women and all racial/ethnic groups, the risk for colorectal cancer is greater for persons aged ≥50 years. The sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, and fecal occult blood tests are the recommended screening tests for early detection of precancerous polyps and prevention of colorectal cancer (18). The HP 2010 objective is to increase the proportion of adults aged ≥50 years who have ever received a colorectal cancer screening examination (objective 3-12). The HP 2010 objective for adults aged ≥50 is to increase to 33% the proportion that received a blood stool test during the preceding 2 years (objective no. 3-12a). Although no state and territory achieved this goal in 2008, approximately 4% of MMSAs and counties achieved the target. The target for ever having a sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy is 50% (objective no. 3-12b). In 2008, 94% of states and territories, 98% of MMSAs, and 94% of counties achieved the target objective.

Cervical Cancer Screening

Cervical cancer was once the leading cause of cancer deaths among women in the United States (25). In 2006§, a total of 11,982 women were told they had cervical cancer and 3,976 women died of the disease (26). The numbers of cases and deaths from cervical cancer have declined substantially during the past 40 years (27,28), largely because of early detection by the Pap test, which detects precancerous or abnormal cells in the cervix (29). Cervical cancer most often occurs in women aged ≥30 years, and racial/ethnic disparities exists in the incidence of cervical cancer among women in the United States. The Pap test is highly recommended for women aged ≥18 years (30). The HP 2010 objective is to increase to 90% the proportion women aged ≥18 years who received a Pap test during the preceding 3 years (objective no. 3-11b). In 2008, no state and territory achieved the target goal. However, 5% of MMSAs and 9% of counties achieved the objective.

Breast Cancer Screening

Among women, breast cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States (31). However, breast cancer does affect men. In 2006§, a total of 191,410 women and 1,854 men were diagnosed with breast cancer, and 40,820 women and 389 men died from the disease (25). Three established methods for conducting a breast cancer screening are mammogram, clinical breast examination, and breast self-examination (32). The mammogram, a radiograph of the breast, is considered the best method to detect early breast cancer. Regular mammogram screenings can lower risk for mortality from breast cancer disease (32,33). The HP 2010 objective is to increase to 70% the proportion of women aged ≥40 years who had received a mammogram during the preceding 2 years (objective no. 3-13). In 2008, approximately 83% of states and territories, 89% of MMSAs, and 90% of counties met the HP 2010 target for mammogram screening.

Prostate Cancer Screening

Prostate cancer, one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in the United States (34), is the second-leading cause of cancer deaths among men (35). In 2006§, a total of 203,415 new cases of prostate cancer were diagnosed and 28,372 men died from the disease (25). Among racial/ethnic groups, black men experienced a higher rate of prostate cancer compared with white men (218 versus 135 per 100,000 men, respectively) (25,36). Two common tests for prostate cancer are the digital rectal examination (DRE) and PSA tests (37). PSA is a substance produced by cells from the prostate gland and released into the blood. The PSA test measures the level of PSA in the bloodstream (36). Higher PSA levels are associated with inflammation of the prostate gland or the presence of cancer (37). On the basis of the results of the PSA test and other factors (e.g., age, race/ethnicity, and family history), the physician can determine if further tests are warranted (37,38).

A report by USPSTF indicated that the PSA test lacks precision for detecting clinical determinants of prostate cancer among men aged <75 years (38). In addition, the task force suggested that evidence is insufficient to assess the potential benefits of testing compared with potential complications resulting from diagnostic testing by biopsy (38).

Health Risk Behaviors

Cigarette Smoking

Cigarette smoking is the single most preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States (39). It causes approximately 443,000, or one in five, deaths each year (40). In 2009, approximately 20.9% of persons aged ≥18 years were current smokers. Of these, approximately 78.1% smoked every day and 21.9% smoked some days (41).

Lung cancer is a major health outcome attributable to cigarette smoking and varies among smokers, sex, and racial/ethnic populations (42). Among men who smoke cigarettes, the risk for developing lung cancer is approximately two-to-three times greater than nonsmokers (43). Cigarette smoking increases the length of time a person develops a disability by approximately 2 years (43). For every person who dies from a smoking-related disease, ≥20 persons suffer with at least one major illness related to cigarette smoking (44,45). In addition, an estimated 49,000 tobacco-related deaths and >$10 billion in annual health care expenditures result from exposure of secondhand smoke (44,45).

Although the overall rate of current cigarette smokers has declined (39), smoking rates continue to be high among states and territories, MMSAs, and counties. The HP 2010 objective is to reduce to 12% the proportion of adults aged ≥18 years who smoke cigarettes (objective no. 27-1a). In 2008, 6% of states and territories, 7% of MMSAs, and 11% of counties achieved this objective.

Binge and Heavy Drinking

Excessive alcohol consumption, which includes binge and heavy drinking, has been linked to injuries and deaths from fires, falls, motor-vehicle crashes, domestic violence, rape, child abuse, and drowning (46--48). Continued excessive drinking can result in chronic diseases (e.g., high blood pressure, heart arrhythmias, stroke, liver cirrhosis, pancreatitis, and cancer) (49--51). The HP 2010 objective is to reduce to ≤13.4% the proportion of adults aged ≥18 years who engage in binge drinking during the preceding month (objective no. 26-11c). In 2008, approximately 30% of states and territories, 26% of MMSAs, and 28% of counties achieved the HP 2010 goal.

No Leisure-Time Physical Activity

Inactivity has been a precursor to several chronic disease outcomes (e.g., diabetes, heart disease, arthritis management, and certain forms of cancer) (52). Adults who do not participate in any leisure-time physical activity are at greater risk for developing chronic diseases and experiencing limitation of activities because of disability compared with those who participate in certain type of leisure-time physical activity (53). The HP 2010 objective is to reduce to ≤20% the proportion of adults aged ≥18 years who engage in no physical activity (objective no. 22-1). In 2008, approximately 13% of states and territories, 14% of MMSAs, and 26% of counties achieved this HP 2010 target.

Overweight and Obesity

Effects of overweight and obesity in the United States continue to be a major health priority (54). Overweight and obesity increase the risk for various chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, stroke, gall bladder disease, and arthritis-related disabilities), and certain cancers (e.g., colon, breast, esophagus, endometrial, and kidney) (55). Obesity and type 2 diabetes coexist in specific geographic patterns on the basis of socioeconomic status, community and environmental factors, and genetic risk factors among similar ethnic groups. This comorbid relation between obesity and type 2 diabetes demonstrates the complexity of chronic disease indicators and the need to develop comprehensive intervention strategies to address both components (56,57). In addition, a direct association between a high BMI (BMI ≥35 kg/m2) and years of life loss (YLL) exists (58). The HP 2010 objective is to reduce to <15% the proportion of adults aged ≥20 years who are obese (BMI ≥30.0) (objective no. 19-2). In 2008, the HP 2010 target was achieved by only one county (Summit County, Utah).

Chronic Conditions

Asthma Prevalence

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder characterized by excessive sensitivity of the lungs that results in airway obstruction, respiratory symptoms, edema, and limitation of airflow (59). Environmental factors (e.g., airborne allergens and respiratory infections) and certain socioeconomic factors have an impact on the severity of asthma and its associated costs. In 2008, approximately 23.3 million persons in the United States indicated they had current asthma (60). In addition, asthma disproportionately affects minorities, the poor, and inner-city populations (61). Because asthma is an episodic disease, the cost for treatment is driven by emergency department visits, hospital admissions, and chronic comorbid conditions (e.g., acute seasonal rhinitis and sinusitis) (59). Effects of asthma include limitation of activities, increased hospital admissions and emergency department visits, and loss of workdays (61). In 2008, BRFSS data indicated variability among states and territories, MMSAs, and counties.

Diabetes Prevalence

Diabetes is a group of diseases characterized by increased levels of blood glucose resulting from defects in insulin production by the pancreas or because cells in the muscles, liver, and fat do not use insulin efficiently (62,63). Diabetes is a highly prevalent and debilitating disease that increases the risk for other serious health conditions (e.g., heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, and lower-extremity amputations) (64). Control and monitoring of high glucose levels and participation in certain types of physical activity can prevent, delay, or decrease the negative health outcomes from diabetes (64).

Disability

Approximately 50 million adults experience a certain type of disability in the United States (65). Disabilities (e.g., physical limitations because of arthritis or other chronic conditions, vision loss, hearing loss, and intellectual or mental disability) can negatively impact determinants of quality of life (e.g., ability to perform basic activities of daily living, maintain employment, and socialization) (66,67). Disability is closely linked to increased medical expenditures and poses a substantial concern for future health-care financing (68). Disability-related costs for medical care and loss of productivity is approximately $300 billion annually in the United States (68). Although rates of severe disability have been declining among older populations during the preceding two decades, young and work-age populations have experienced an increase in disability rates (69). The need to use special equipment (e.g., special telephone, cane, or wheelchair) also is an indicator of overall health status (69). Disability studies indicate an association between the number of assistive devices used and perceived decreased life experience and dependence (70,71).

Cardiovascular Diseases

Coronary Heart Disease

Heart disease continues to be the leading cause of mortality in the United States (72). Cardiovascular disease refers to several diseases and conditions affecting the heart and blood vessels (73). CHD, including angina and myocardial infarction, is the most prevalent cardiovascular disease (70). CHD is a widely studied and complex disease with modifiable risk factors (e.g., high blood pressure, high cholesterol, inactivity, obesity, and smoking) (74). Because a substantial proportion of the population has more than one CHD risk factor, and research has identified racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities associated with CHD, it is imperative to focus intervention strategies on identifying persons with multiple risk factors and addressing health disparities (75).

Stroke

Stroke is the third-leading cause of death in the United States (76). When nonfatal, stroke is a leading cause of permanent disability and economic loss because of physical impairment (74). In 2006, one in 17 deaths was caused by stroke (76). Approximately 795,000 persons suffer a stroke each year (75,76). Risk factors associated with stroke are high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, atrial fibrillation, high blood cholesterol levels, physical inactivity, alcohol and tobacco use, and obesity (77). The incidence of stroke varies by age and race/ethnicity, and the risk for stroke increases with age; however, stroke can occur at any age. Blacks have nearly twice the risk for having a stroke compared with whites, and both blacks and Hispanics are more likely to die following a stroke than whites (75,76). Health-care services, medications, and loss of work because of stroke costs approximately $68.9 billion per year (78,79).

Limitations

The findings in this report are subject to at least five limitations. First, BRFSS is a telephone-based survey that does not collect information from persons in institutions, nursing homes, long-term-care facilities, and correctional institutions, and results are not generalizable to these populations. Because of changes in telecommunications use by the general public, response rates for landline-only households have decreased. In 2009, BRFSS began collecting data on use of multimode communications modalities (e.g., cell phone only households, cell phone and landline households, and mail surveys). However, these data are not available for all states and territories and are not included in this report. Second, BRFSS is conducted in several languages other than English (i.e., Spanish, Chinese [Mandarin], and Portuguese), but does not provide data on persons who speak other languages and some geographical dialects of Spanish and Chinese. In particular, BRFSS is limited in reaching persons aged 18--24 years, males, and persons of various racial/ethnic categories other than non-Hispanic whites. Fourth, BRFSS does not collect data on persons residing in institutional settings (e.g., nursing homes and correctional facilities). Finally, data is self-reported and subject to recall bias.

Despite these limitations, BRFSS is a cost-effective, timely, and flexible survey that provides reliable and valid estimates of health-risk behaviors, chronic diseases, and conditions and use of preventive services at the national, state, and local levels. BRFSS data have been demonstrated to provide reliable and valid estimates when compared with national household surveys (80) and often are the only timely source of data available to states and communities to assess local health conditions and to accurately track progress of health promotion programs and strategies.

Conclusion

The results in this report indicate the need for high-quality health promotion and disease prevention programs and development of beneficial policies. Results from BRFSS are used to identify emerging health problems, to support health-related legislative efforts, to develop and evaluate public health policies and programs, and to monitor progress toward achieving HP 2010 objectives. BRFSS data are used at the federal, state, and local level to monitor progress and support efforts to prevent the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States.

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TABLE 1. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by state/ territory --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

State/Territory

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI§)

Alabama

6,469

78.8

0.7

(77.4--80.2)

Alaska

2,653

85.7

1.1

(83.6--87.8)

Arizona

6,086

84.0

1.0

(82.0--86.0)

Arkansas

5,677

80.7

0.7

(79.3--82.1)

California

11,592

81.4

0.5

(80.4--82.4)

Colorado

11,717

86.7

0.4

(85.9--87.5)

Connecticut

6,091

88.9

0.5

(87.9--89.9)

Delaware

4,020

86.9

0.7

(85.5--88.3)

District of Columbia

4,167

86.2

0.7

(84.7--87.7)

Florida

10,834

84.3

0.6

(83.1--85.5)

Georgia

5,701

83.6

0.7

(82.3--84.9)

Hawaii

6,438

85.2

0.6

(84.0--86.4)

Idaho

5,099

86.0

0.6

(84.8--87.2)

Illinois

5,159

84.8

0.7

(83.5--86.1)

Indiana

4,887

83.3

0.7

(81.9--84.7)

Iowa

6,001

87.5

0.5

(86.4--88.6)

Kansas

8,615

86.4

0.5

(85.5--87.3)

Kentucky

8,080

79.7

0.6

(78.5--80.9)

Louisiana

6,166

81.7

0.6

(80.5--82.9)

Maine

6,767

87.0

0.5

(86.0--88.0)

Maryland

9,405

87.5

0.5

(86.5--88.5)

Massachusetts

20,523

87.7

0.3

(87.0--88.4)

Michigan

9,426

85.6

0.5

(84.7--86.5)

Minnesota

4,286

88.6

0.6

(87.4--89.8)

Mississippi

7,930

78.8

0.6

(77.7--79.9)

Missouri

5,144

83.1

0.7

(81.7--84.5)

Montana

6,756

86.0

0.6

(84.8--87.2)

Nebraska

16,222

88.2

0.4

(87.4--89.0)

Nevada

4,761

81.3

0.9

(79.5--83.1)

New Hampshire

6,816

88.6

0.5

(87.6--89.6)

New Jersey

11,674

84.4

0.5

(83.4--85.4)

New Mexico

6,211

81.8

0.7

(80.4--83.2)

New York

7,885

84.5

0.6

(83.4--85.6)

North Carolina

15,779

82.5

0.4

(81.6--83.4)

North Dakota

5,019

86.6

0.6

(85.4--87.8)

Ohio

12,767

84.4

0.5

(83.5--85.3)

Oklahoma

7,778

81.3

0.5

(80.2--82.4)

Oregon

4,787

86.8

0.6

(85.7--87.9)

Pennsylvania

13,146

83.7

0.5

(82.7--84.7)

Rhode Island

4,684

86.6

0.6

(85.4--87.8)

South Carolina

10,124

83.8

0.6

(82.7--84.9)

South Dakota

6,971

87.9

0.5

(87.0--88.8)

Tennessee

5,013

79.5

0.8

(77.9--81.1)

Texas

10,616

81.0

0.6

(79.8--82.2)

Utah

5,312

89.3

0.5

(88.3--90.3)

Vermont

6,736

88.5

0.5

(87.6--89.4)

Virginia

5,234

87.3

0.6

(86.1--88.5)

Washington

22,490

86.6

0.3

(86.0--87.2)

West Virginia

4,152

75.9

0.8

(74.4--77.4)

Wisconsin

7,063

87.7

0.6

(86.6--88.8)

Wyoming

7,986

86.9

0.4

(86.0--87.8)

Guam

794

81.6

1.6

(78.4--84.8)

Puerto Rico

4,455

67.8

0.9

(66.1--69.5)

Virgin Islands

2,475

84.3

0.9

(82.6--86.0)

Median

85.0

Range

67.8--89.3

* Respondents were asked to rate general health as poor, fair, good, very good, or excellent. Respondents were classified into two groups: those who reported fair or poor health and those with good, very good, or excellent health.

Standard error.

§ Confidence interval.


TABLE 2. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI§)

Akron, Ohio

2,215

87.2

1.0

(85.3--89.1)

Albuquerque, New Mexico

1,667

83.1

1.3

(80.6--85.6)

Allentown--Bethlehem--Easton, Pennsylvania--New Jersey

933

86.6

1.6

(83.5--89.7)

Amarillo, Texas

526

79.9

2.4

(75.3--84.5)

Anchorage, Alaska

551

86.3

1.7

(82.9--89.7)

Asheville, North Carolina

864

84.4

1.4

(81.6--87.2)

Atlanta--Sandy Springs--Marietta, Georgia

2,295

87.0

0.9

(85.2--88.8)

Atlantic City--Hammonton, New Jersey

522

82.3

1.9

(78.5--86.1)

Augusta--Richmond County, Georgia--South Carolina

866

85.3

1.6

(82.1--88.5)

Augusta--Waterville, Maine

567

86.8

1.7

(83.5--90.1)

Austin--Round Rock, Texas

940

87.4

1.4

(84.6--90.2)

Baltimore--Towson, Maryland

3,454

87.1

0.7

(85.8--88.4)

Bangor, Maine

552

86.5

1.6

(83.3--89.7)

Barnstable Town, Massachusetts

519

89.7

1.6

(86.5--92.9)

Barre, Vermont

670

87.1

1.8

(83.6--90.6)

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

1,031

84.8

1.3

(82.2--87.4)

Berlin, New Hampshire--Vermont

763

82.8

1.6

(79.6--86.0)

Bethesda--Frederick--Gaithersburg, Maryland

1,729

90.8

1.1

(88.6--93.0)

Billings, Montana

569

85.3

1.6

(82.1--88.5)

Birmingham--Hoover, Alabama

1,157

82.9

1.4

(80.1--85.7)

Bismarck, North Dakota

770

88.4

1.3

(85.8--91.0)

Boise City--Nampa, Idaho

1,289

86.9

1.1

(84.8--89.0)

Boston--Quincy, Massachusetts

4,212

88.3

0.6

(87.0--89.6)

Boulder, Colorado

712

92.2

1.2

(89.9--94.5)

Bozeman, Montana

568

92.8

1.9

(89.0--96.6)

Bremerton--Silverdale, Washington

947

86.4

1.5

(83.4--89.4)

Bridgeport--Stamford--Norwalk, Connecticut

1,782

90.5

0.9

(88.7--92.3)

Buffalo--Niagara Falls, New York

629

84.3

1.7

(80.9--87.7)

Burlington--South Burlington, Vermont

1,960

90.9

0.7

(89.5--92.3)

Butte--Silver Bow, Montana

539

82.7

1.7

(79.3--86.1)

Cambridge--Newton--Framingham, Massachusetts

3,802

90.1

0.7

(88.7--91.5)

Camden, New Jersey

1,626

85.0

1.2

(82.6--87.4)

Canton--Massillon, Ohio

862

85.3

1.4

(82.6--88.0)

Casper, Wyoming

1,023

86.3

1.4

(83.6--89.0)

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

559

88.5

1.5

(85.6--91.4)

Charleston, West Virginia

743

75.4

1.8

(71.9--78.9)

Charleston--North Charleston--Summerville, South Carolina

1,196

88.8

1.3

(86.3--91.3)

Charlotte--Gastonia--Concord, North Carolina--South Carolina

2,052

84.5

1.1

(82.3--86.7)

Cheyenne, Wyoming

1,188

87.4

1.1

(85.2--89.6)

Chicago--Naperville--Joliet, Illinois--Indiana--Wisconsin

3,617

85.6

0.8

(84.1--87.1)

Cincinnati--Middletown, Ohio--Kentucky--Indiana

1,799

85.5

1.1

(83.4--87.6)

Cleveland--Elyria--Mentor, Ohio

1,341

84.9

1.3

(82.4--87.4)

Colorado Springs, Colorado

1,431

88.4

1.2

(86.1--90.7)

Columbia, South Carolina

1,209

89.3

1.1

(87.1--91.5)

Columbus, Ohio

1,655

86.3

1.2

(83.9--88.7)

Concord, New Hampshire

648

90.5

1.3

(88.0--93.0)

Dallas--Plano--Irving, Texas

851

85.4

1.4

(82.6--88.2)

Davenport--Moline--Rock Island, Iowa--Illinois

507

88.9

2.0

(84.9--92.9)

Dayton, Ohio

955

86.3

1.3

(83.8--88.8)

Denver--Aurora, Colorado

5,588

87.9

0.6

(86.8--89.0)

Des Moines--West Des Moines, Iowa

1,016

86.2

1.3

(83.6--88.8)

Detroit--Livonia--Dearborn, Michigan

2,028

83.2

1.1

(81.1--85.3)

Dover, Delaware

1,401

83.5

1.2

(81.1--85.9)

Durham, North Carolina

915

86.3

1.6

(83.1--89.5)

Edison--New Brunswick, New Jersey

2,235

85.8

1.0

(83.8--87.8)

El Paso, Texas

529

68.5

2.9

(62.7--74.3)

Fairbanks, Alaska

507

88.6

1.5

(85.7--91.5)

Fargo, North Dakota--Minnesota

887

88.1

2.1

(83.9--92.3)

Fayetteville, North Carolina

605

79.9

1.9

(76.2--83.6)

Fayetteville--Springdale--Rogers, Arkansas--Missouri

925

87.1

1.3

(84.5--89.7)

Fort Collins--Loveland, Colorado

753

87.0

1.9

(83.3--90.7)

Fort Worth--Arlington, Texas

649

83.2

1.9

(79.5--86.9)

Gillette, Wyoming

512

86.7

1.7

(83.4--90.0)

See page 16 for footnotes


TABLE 2. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI§)

Grand Island, Nebraska

787

85.8

1.4

(83.0--88.6)

Grand Rapids--Wyoming, Michigan

646

89.7

1.4

(87.0--92.4)

Greeley, Colorado

517

87.3

1.7

(84.0--90.6)

Greensboro--High Point, North Carolina

908

87.1

1.3

(84.5--89.7)

Greenville--Mauldin--Easley, South Carolina

962

81.2

1.9

(77.5--84.9)

Hagerstown--Martinsburg, Maryland--West Virginia

683

84.0

1.8

(80.5--87.5)

Hartford--West Hartford--East Hartford, Connecticut

1,935

88.7

0.9

(87.0--90.4)

Hastings, Nebraska

640

86.4

1.5

(83.4--89.4)

Hickory--Lenoir--Morganton, North Carolina

921

81.7

1.7

(78.3--85.1)

Hilo, Hawaii

1,437

84.2

1.2

(81.8--86.6)

Hilton Head Island--Beaufort, South Carolina

833

88.4

1.5

(85.5--91.3)

Honolulu, Hawaii

3,002

85.5

0.8

(84.0--87.0)

Houston--Sugar Land--Baytown, Texas

1,445

82.9

1.2

(80.5--85.3)

Huntington--Ashland, West Virginia--Kentucky--Ohio

688

75.5

2.0

(71.7--79.3)

Indianapolis--Carmel, Indiana

1,174

83.4

1.5

(80.5--86.3)

Jackson, Mississippi

807

84.7

1.4

(82.0--87.4)

Jacksonville, Florida

784

86.3

1.6

(83.2--89.4)

Kahului--Wailuku, Hawaii

1,403

85.4

1.4

(82.7--88.1)

Kansas City, Missouri--Kansas

3,326

86.7

0.9

(84.9--88.5)

Kapaa, Hawaii

596

83.8

1.8

(80.2--87.4)

Kennewick--Pasco--Richland, Washington

660

83.5

2.1

(79.4--87.6)

Las Cruces, New Mexico

554

79.4

2.0

(75.4--83.4)

Las Vegas--Paradise, Nevada

1,551

80.9

1.2

(78.5--83.3)

Lebanon, New Hampshire--Vermont

1,878

87.7

1.0

(85.8--89.6)

Lewiston, Idaho--Washington

501

82.0

2.3

(77.5--86.5)

Lincoln, Nebraska

1,201

90.5

1.0

(88.6--92.4)

Little Rock--North Little Rock--Conway, Arkansas

1,242

84.7

1.4

(82.0--87.4)

Los Angeles--Long Beach--Glendale, California

1,515

77.2

1.3

(74.6--79.8)

Louisville/Jefferson County, Kentucky--Indiana

1,036

83.6

1.5

(80.7--86.5)

Lubbock, Texas

513

84.7

2.3

(80.2--89.2)

Manchester--Nashua, New Hampshire

1,469

89.1

1.0

(87.2--91.0)

Memphis, Tennessee--Mississippi--Arkansas

1,094

83.4

1.5

(80.5--86.3)

Miami--Fort Lauderdale--Pompano Beach, Florida

776

86.3

1.5

(83.4--89.2)

Milwaukee--Waukesha--West Allis, Wisconsin

1,414

85.9

1.5

(82.9--88.9)

Minneapolis--St. Paul--Bloomington, Minnesota--Wisconsin

2,523

89.9

0.7

(88.4--91.4)

Minot, North Dakota

548

87.8

1.5

(84.9--90.7)

Mobile, Alabama

586

77.6

2.8

(72.1--83.1)

Montgomery, Alabama

517

78.5

2.5

(73.6--83.4)

Myrtle Beach--North Myrtle Beach--Conway, South Carolina

679

83.2

1.8

(79.6--86.8)

Nashville--Davidson--Murfreesboro--Franklin, Tennessee

775

81.7

1.9

(78.0--85.4)

Nassau--Suffolk, New York

1,074

87.0

1.4

(84.3--89.7)

Newark--Union, New Jersey--Pennsylvania

3,212

85.6

0.9

(83.8--87.4)

New Haven--Milford, Connecticut

1,575

86.0

1.3

(83.4--88.6)

New Orleans--Metairie--Kenner, Louisiana

1,395

82.8

1.2

(80.5--85.1)

New York--White Plains--Wayne, New York--New Jersey

4,737

83.4

0.8

(81.9--84.9)

Norfolk, Nebraska

642

89.0

1.4

(86.2--91.8)

North Platte, Nebraska

552

86.5

1.7

(83.3--89.7)

Oakland--Fremont--Hayward, California

932

79.8

1.9

(76.1--83.5)

Ocean City, New Jersey

506

86.1

1.9

(82.4--89.8)

Ogden--Clearfield, Utah

928

90.0

1.1

(87.9--92.1)

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

2,404

83.7

0.9

(82.0--85.4)

Olympia, Washington

1,562

86.3

1.2

(84.0--88.6)

Omaha--Council Bluffs, Nebraska--Iowa

2,414

90.1

0.8

(88.5--91.7)

Orangeburg, South Carolina

520

80.3

2.1

(76.1--84.5)

Orlando--Kissimmee, Florida

663

85.9

2.0

(81.9--89.9)

Peabody, Massachusetts

2,783

85.9

1.1

(83.8--88.0)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

3,214

83.3

1.1

(81.2--85.4)

Phoenix--Mesa--Scottsdale, Arizona

1,478

84.4

1.5

(81.5--87.3)

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

2,940

84.6

1.0

(82.6--86.6)

Portland--South Portland--Biddeford, Maine

2,059

89.3

0.8

(87.7--90.9)

Portland--Vancouver--Beaverton, Oregon--Washington

3,870

88.3

0.7

(87.0--89.6)

Providence--New Bedford--Fall River, Rhode Island--Massachusetts

8,183

85.9

0.5

(84.9--86.9)

Provo--Orem, Utah

597

91.1

1.3

(88.6--93.6)

See page 16 for footnotes


TABLE 2. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI§)

Raleigh--Cary, North Carolina

1,104

84.7

1.6

(81.5--87.9)

Rapid City, South Dakota

987

89.9

1.0

(88.0--91.8)

Reno--Sparks, Nevada

1,652

83.3

1.2

(80.9--85.7)

Richmond, Virginia

818

89.2

1.2

(86.8--91.6)

Riverside--San Bernardino--Ontario, California

1,351

83.3

1.3

(80.7--85.9)

Riverton, Wyoming

622

84.2

1.7

(80.8--87.6)

Rochester, New York

602

85.4

1.7

(82.0--88.8)

Rockingham County--Strafford County, New Hampshire

1,674

89.0

1.0

(87.0--91.0)

Rock Springs, Wyoming

523

86.9

1.5

(84.0--89.8)

Rutland, Vermont

710

88.3

1.3

(85.7--90.9)

Sacramento--Arden--Arcade--Roseville, California

902

88.3

1.4

(85.5--91.1)

St. Louis, Missouri--Illinois

1,639

85.1

1.1

(82.8--87.4)

Salt Lake City, Utah

2,199

88.5

0.8

(86.9--90.1)

San Antonio, Texas

1,485

84.7

1.1

(82.5--86.9)

San Diego--Carlsbad--San Marcos, California

1,136

85.1

1.3

(82.5--87.7)

San Francisco--San Mateo--Redwood City, California

673

83.6

1.8

(80.1--87.1)

San Jose--Sunnyvale--Santa Clara, California

580

86.8

1.8

(83.2--90.4)

Santa Ana--Anaheim--Irvine, California

965

85.2

1.6

(82.1--88.3)

Santa Fe, New Mexico

514

86.6

1.9

(82.9--90.3)

Scottsbluff, Nebraska

794

82.9

1.6

(79.8--86.0)

Scranton--Wilkes--Barre, Pennsylvania

1,632

81.8

1.7

(78.5--85.1)

Seaford, Delaware

1,260

84.0

1.3

(81.5--86.5)

Seattle--Bellevue--Everett, Washington

5,212

89.0

0.6

(87.9--90.1)

Shreveport--Bossier City, Louisiana

607

85.0

1.6

(81.9--88.1)

Sierra Vista--Douglas, Arizona

515

81.5

2.0

(77.6--85.4)

Sioux City, Iowa--Nebraska--South Dakota

1,215

83.2

2.2

(78.8--87.6)

Sioux Falls, South Dakota

944

90.0

1.0

(88.1--91.9)

Spokane, Washington

1,270

86.3

1.1

(84.1--88.5)

Springfield, Massachusetts

2,639

86.3

1.1

(84.2--88.4)

Tacoma, Washington

1,775

85.6

1.0

(83.6--87.6)

Tallahassee, Florida

623

87.3

2.5

(82.5--92.1)

Tampa--St. Petersburg--Clearwater, Florida

793

82.8

1.7

(79.5--86.1)

Toledo, Ohio

984

84.7

1.5

(81.9--87.5)

Topeka, Kansas

823

86.4

1.3

(83.9--88.9)

Tucson, Arizona

799

85.6

1.5

(82.8--88.4)

Tulsa, Oklahoma

2,255

82.9

1.0

(81.0--84.8)

Tuscaloosa, Alabama

531

83.0

1.9

(79.3--86.7)

Tyler, Texas

498

81.6

2.2

(77.3--85.9)

Virginia Beach--Norfolk--Newport News, Virginia--North Carolina

1,096

86.7

1.6

(83.5--89.9)

Warren--Troy--Farmington Hills, Michigan

1,839

88.3

0.9

(86.6--90.0)

Washington--Arlington--Alexandria, District of Columbia--Virginia--Maryland--West Virginia

6,560

89.8

0.8

(88.2--91.4)

Wenatchee, Washington

1,063

82.1

1.8

(78.6--85.6)

Wichita, Kansas

1,644

86.9

0.9

(85.2--88.6)

Wichita Falls, Texas

525

81.3

3.0

(75.4--87.2)

Wilmington, Delaware--Maryland--New Jersey

1,795

87.1

1.0

(85.1--89.1)

Wilmington, North Carolina

602

82.3

2.2

(78.0--86.6)

Winston--Salem, North Carolina

525

86.9

1.7

(83.5--90.3)

Worcester, Massachusetts

2,509

88.6

1.0

(86.7--90.5)

Yakima, Washington

767

81.0

1.8

(77.5--84.5)

Youngstown--Warren--Boardman, Ohio--Pennsylvania

1,012

84.7

1.8

(81.1--88.3)

Yuma, Arizona

567

79.1

2.1

(75.1--83.1)

Median

85.9

Range

68.5--92.8

* Respondents were asked to rate general health as poor, fair, good, very good, or excellent. Respondents were classified into two groups: those who reported fair or poor health, and those with good, very good, or excellent health.

Standard error.

§ Confidence interval.

Metropolitan division.


TABLE 3. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by county --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI§)

Jefferson County, Alabama

605

85.2

1.6

(82.0--88.4)

Mobile County, Alabama

586

77.6

2.8

(72.1--83.1)

Montgomery County, Alabama

350

79.2

2.8

(73.7--84.7)

Tuscaloosa County, Alabama

444

83.3

2.1

(79.3--87.3)

Anchorage Municipality, Alaska

406

86.8

2.0

(83.0--90.6)

Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska

507

88.6

1.5

(85.7--91.5)

Cochise County, Arizona

515

81.5

2.0

(77.6--85.4)

Maricopa County, Arizona

966

84.4

1.5

(81.4--87.4)

Pima County, Arizona

799

85.6

1.5

(82.8--88.4)

Pinal County, Arizona

512

84.9

2.5

(79.9--89.9)

Yuma County, Arizona

567

79.1

2.1

(75.1--83.1)

Benton County, Arkansas

492

85.8

1.8

(82.3--89.3)

Pulaski County, Arkansas

818

87.8

1.3

(85.2--90.4)

Washington County, Arkansas

387

87.0

2.2

(82.7--91.3)

Alameda County, California

515

80.9

2.4

(76.1--85.7)

Contra Costa County, California

417

79.7

2.6

(74.5--84.9)

Los Angeles County, California

1,515

77.2

1.3

(74.6--79.8)

Orange County, California

965

85.2

1.6

(82.1--88.3)

Riverside County, California

710

84.0

1.8

(80.5--87.5)

Sacramento County, California

559

88.4

1.9

(84.7--92.1)

San Bernardino County, California

641

82.8

1.9

(79.0--86.6)

San Diego County, California

1,136

85.1

1.3

(82.5--87.7)

San Francisco County, California

316

82.8

2.5

(77.9--87.7)

Santa Clara County, California

567

86.8

1.8

(83.2--90.4)

Adams County, Colorado

795

87.0

1.4

(84.2--89.8)

Arapahoe County, Colorado

1,219

88.2

1.3

(85.6--90.8)

Boulder County, Colorado

712

92.2

1.2

(89.9--94.5)

Denver County, Colorado

1,199

83.1

1.5

(80.1--86.1)

Douglas County, Colorado

630

93.2

1.2

(90.9--95.5)

El Paso County, Colorado

1,341

88.4

1.2

(86.0--90.8)

Jefferson County, Colorado

1,465

88.4

1.0

(86.4--90.4)

Larimer County, Colorado

753

87.0

1.9

(83.3--90.7)

Weld County, Colorado

517

87.3

1.7

(84.0--90.6)

Fairfield County, Connecticut

1,782

90.5

0.9

(88.7--92.3)

Hartford County, Connecticut

1,429

87.9

1.1

(85.8--90.0)

New Haven County, Connecticut

1,575

86.0

1.3

(83.4--88.6)

Tolland County, Connecticut

275

88.9

2.4

(84.1--93.7)

Kent County, Delaware

1,401

83.5

1.2

(81.1--85.9)

New Castle County, Delaware

1,359

88.8

1.0

(86.8--90.8)

Sussex County, Delaware

1,260

84.0

1.3

(81.5--86.5)

District of Columbia, District of Columbia

4,167

86.2

0.8

(84.7--87.7)

Duval County, Florida

276

85.6

2.4

(80.9--90.3)

Miami--Dade County, Florida

259

85.6

2.3

(81.0--90.2)

Palm Beach County, Florida

271

87.9

2.3

(83.5--92.3)

Pinellas County, Florida

263

82.1

2.6

(77.0--87.2)

Cobb County, Georgia

287

90.1

1.9

(86.4--93.8)

DeKalb County, Georgia

317

87.1

2.1

(83.1--91.1)

Fulton County, Georgia

334

87.9

2.4

(83.3--92.5)

Hawaii County, Hawaii

1,437

84.2

1.2

(81.8--86.6)

Honolulu County, Hawaii

3,002

85.5

0.8

(84.0--87.0)

Kauai County, Hawaii

596

83.8

1.8

(80.2--87.4)

Maui County, Hawaii

1,403

85.4

1.4

(82.7--88.1)

Ada County, Idaho

640

89.5

1.3

(86.9--92.1)

Canyon County, Idaho

523

84.4

1.8

(80.8--88.0)

Nez Perce County, Idaho

265

81.9

2.6

(76.8--87.0)

Cook County, Illinois

1,693

83.1

1.2

(80.7--85.5)

DuPage County, Illinois

337

90.8

1.7

(87.5--94.1)

Lake County, Indiana

493

84.6

2.5

(79.7--89.5)

Marion County, Indiana

827

80.4

2.0

(76.5--84.3)

Linn County, Iowa

478

87.5

1.7

(84.3--90.7)

Polk County, Iowa

776

86.4

1.5

(83.4--89.4)

Scott County, Iowa

380

90.3

1.6

(87.1--93.5)

Johnson County, Kansas

1,588

92.0

0.9

(90.2--93.8)

See page 21 for footnotes


TABLE 3. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by county --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI§)

Sedgwick County, Kansas

1,269

86.6

1.0

(84.6--88.6)

Shawnee County, Kansas

601

87.0

1.5

(84.2--89.8)

Wyandotte County, Kansas

353

79.1

2.9

(73.5--84.7)

Jefferson County, Kentucky

617

84.7

1.8

(81.2--88.2)

Caddo Parish, Louisiana

416

83.2

2.2

(78.9--87.5)

East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

650

85.8

1.7

(82.5--89.1)

Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

557

81.4

1.9

(77.6--85.2)

Orleans Parish, Louisiana

321

82.2

2.4

(77.5--86.9)

St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana

330

87.2

2.0

(83.2--91.2)

Cumberland County, Maine

1,032

89.4

1.0

(87.4--91.4)

Kennebec County, Maine

567

86.8

1.7

(83.5--90.1)

Penobscot County, Maine

552

86.5

1.6

(83.3--89.7)

Sagadahoc County, Maine

262

92.2

1.7

(88.9--95.5)

York County, Maine

765

88.5

1.4

(85.8--91.2)

Anne Arundel County, Maryland

643

90.4

1.3

(87.9--92.9)

Baltimore County, Maryland

1,024

86.4

1.2

(84.1--88.7)

Calvert County, Maryland

250

85.3

2.7

(79.9--90.7)

Cecil County, Maryland

268

84.7

2.4

(80.0--89.4)

Charles County, Maryland

307

88.5

2.2

(84.3--92.7)

Frederick County, Maryland

581

87.4

2.0

(83.5--91.3)

Harford County, Maryland

291

91.0

1.6

(88.0--94.0)

Howard County, Maryland

368

90.6

1.6

(87.4--93.8)

Montgomery County, Maryland

1,148

91.6

1.3

(89.1--94.1)

Prince George´s County, Maryland

737

88.4

1.7

(85.1--91.7)

Queen Anne´s County, Maryland

309

84.8

2.6

(79.7--89.9)

Washington County, Maryland

438

84.6

2.2

(80.2--89.0)

Baltimore City, Maryland

599

80.7

2.0

(76.7--84.7)

Barnstable County, Massachusetts

519

89.7

1.6

(86.5--92.9)

Bristol County, Massachusetts

3,499

84.2

0.9

(82.3--86.1)

Essex County, Massachusetts

2,783

86.1

1.1

(84.0--88.2)

Franklin County, Massachusetts

269

88.0

2.3

(83.4--92.6)

Hampden County, Massachusetts

2,057

85.1

1.0

(83.1--87.1)

Hampshire County, Massachusetts

313

90.4

1.7

(87.1--93.7)

Middlesex County, Massachusetts

3,802

90.2

0.7

(88.9--91.5)

Norfolk County, Massachusetts

1,151

91.3

0.9

(89.5--93.1)

Plymouth County, Massachusetts

812

90.1

1.2

(87.7--92.5)

Suffolk County, Massachusetts

2,249

84.1

1.1

(81.9--86.3)

Worcester County, Massachusetts

2,509

88.6

1.0

(86.7--90.5)

Kent County, Michigan

471

89.5

1.8

(85.9--93.1)

Macomb County, Michigan

532

87.3

1.5

(84.3--90.3)

Oakland County, Michigan

959

88.2

1.3

(85.6--90.8)

Wayne County, Michigan

2,028

83.2

1.1

(81.1--85.3)

Anoka County, Minnesota

297

89.3

1.9

(85.6--93.0)

Dakota County, Minnesota

318

90.0

2.1

(85.9--94.1)

Hennepin County, Minnesota

855

91.9

1.0

(89.9--93.9)

Ramsey County, Minnesota

407

90.0

1.8

(86.4--93.6)

DeSoto County, Mississippi

304

89.3

1.8

(85.9--92.7)

Hinds County, Mississippi

347

82.8

2.3

(78.3--87.3)

Jackson County, Missouri

517

82.3

2.1

(78.1--86.5)

St. Louis County, Missouri

545

87.2

1.8

(83.7--90.7)

St. Louis City, Missouri

391

82.0

2.2

(77.7--86.3)

Gallatin County, Montana

568

92.8

1.9

(89.0--96.6)

Silver Bow County, Montana

539

82.7

1.7

(79.3--86.1)

Yellowstone County, Montana

518

85.3

1.7

(82.0--88.6)

Adams County, Nebraska

504

86.6

1.7

(83.3--89.9)

Dakota County, Nebraska

711

81.3

1.7

(77.9--84.7)

Douglas County, Nebraska

928

90.0

1.1

(87.9--92.1)

Hall County, Nebraska

541

85.8

1.7

(82.5--89.1)

Lancaster County, Nebraska

876

90.4

1.0

(88.4--92.4)

Lincoln County, Nebraska

518

86.1

1.8

(82.7--89.5)

Madison County, Nebraska

431

88.9

1.6

(85.7--92.1)

Sarpy County, Nebraska

617

89.4

2.1

(85.4--93.4)

Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska

784

83.0

1.6

(79.9--86.1)

See page 21 for footnotes


TABLE 3. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by county --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI§)

Seward County, Nebraska

325

88.5

1.8

(85.0--92.0)

Clark County, Nevada

1,551

80.9

1.2

(78.5--83.3)

Washoe County, Nevada

1,628

83.4

1.2

(81.0--85.8)

Coos County, New Hampshire

679

82.4

1.7

(79.1--85.7)

Grafton County, New Hampshire

822

87.9

1.5

(84.9--90.9)

Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

1,469

89.1

1.0

(87.2--91.0)

Merrimack County, New Hampshire

648

90.5

1.3

(88.0--93.0)

Rockingham County, New Hampshire

1,046

89.5

1.3

(87.0--92.0)

Strafford County, New Hampshire

628

87.9

1.4

(85.1--90.7)

Atlantic County, New Jersey

522

82.3

1.9

(78.5--86.1)

Bergen County, New Jersey

630

88.6

1.8

(85.1--92.1)

Burlington County, New Jersey

547

87.2

1.7

(83.8--90.6)

Camden County, New Jersey

559

82.3

2.2

(78.0--86.6)

Cape May County, New Jersey

506

86.1

1.9

(82.4--89.8)

Essex County, New Jersey

1,030

84.7

1.3

(82.1--87.3)

Gloucester County, New Jersey

520

87.9

1.5

(84.9--90.9)

Hudson County, New Jersey

999

78.8

1.5

(75.8--81.8)

Hunterdon County, New Jersey

485

91.9

1.3

(89.4--94.4)

Middlesex County, New Jersey

638

84.8

1.9

(81.0--88.6)

Monmouth County, New Jersey

554

86.4

1.9

(82.7--90.1)

Morris County, New Jersey

684

91.3

1.2

(89.0--93.6)

Ocean County, New Jersey

501

85.5

1.8

(82.0--89.0)

Passaic County, New Jersey

473

81.1

2.1

(77.0--85.2)

Somerset County, New Jersey

542

89.6

1.8

(86.1--93.1)

Sussex County, New Jersey

494

84.5

2.3

(80.1--88.9)

Union County, New Jersey

486

79.8

2.4

(75.0--84.6)

Warren County, New Jersey

491

84.4

2.0

(80.5--88.3)

Bernalillo County, New Mexico

1,054

83.6

1.5

(80.7--86.5)

Dona Ana County, New Mexico

554

79.4

2.0

(75.4--83.4)

Sandoval County, New Mexico

298

86.2

2.4

(81.6--90.8)

Santa Fe County, New Mexico

514

86.6

1.9

(82.9--90.3)

Valencia County, New Mexico

263

79.2

3.6

(72.2--86.2)

Erie County, New York

506

84.1

2.0

(80.2--88.0)

Kings County, New York

572

79.4

2.1

(75.3--83.5)

Monroe County, New York

411

84.3

2.3

(79.8--88.8)

Nassau County, New York

502

88.9

1.6

(85.7--92.1)

New York County, New York

669

87.1

1.7

(83.9--90.3)

Queens County, New York

499

83.5

1.9

(79.7--87.3)

Suffolk County, New York

572

85.9

2.2

(81.7--90.1)

Westchester County, New York

349

91.9

1.7

(88.6--95.2)

Buncombe County, North Carolina

344

84.2

2.3

(79.8--88.6)

Cabarrus County, North Carolina

366

85.3

2.1

(81.1--89.5)

Catawba County, North Carolina

447

84.1

2.1

(80.1--88.1)

Cumberland County, North Carolina

476

81.0

2.0

(77.0--85.0)

Durham County, North Carolina

395

82.0

2.7

(76.7--87.3)

Forsyth County, North Carolina

408

89.0

1.8

(85.4--92.6)

Gaston County, North Carolina

413

81.9

2.2

(77.6--86.2)

Guilford County, North Carolina

423

91.1

1.3

(88.5--93.7)

Henderson County, North Carolina

289

84.4

2.5

(79.6--89.2)

Johnston County, North Carolina

467

81.2

2.3

(76.6--85.8)

Mecklenburg County, North Carolina

678

85.1

1.8

(81.6--88.6)

New Hanover County, North Carolina

369

81.9

3.0

(76.0--87.8)

Orange County, North Carolina

380

91.7

1.7

(88.4--95.0)

Randolph County, North Carolina

396

79.0

2.7

(73.7--84.3)

Union County, North Carolina

409

85.3

3.0

(79.5--91.1)

Wake County, North Carolina

586

86.4

1.9

(82.8--90.0)

Burleigh County, North Dakota

564

89.0

1.7

(85.8--92.2)

Cass County, North Dakota

832

89.1

1.5

(86.2--92.0)

Ward County, North Dakota

461

88.2

1.6

(85.0--91.4)

Cuyahoga County, Ohio

819

84.9

1.5

(82.0--87.8)

Franklin County, Ohio

787

86.4

1.6

(83.3--89.5)

Hamilton County, Ohio

809

86.7

1.5

(83.8--89.6)

Lucas County, Ohio

779

82.4

1.7

(79.1--85.7)

See page 21 for footnotes


TABLE 3. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by county --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI§)

Mahoning County, Ohio

790

85.7

1.4

(82.9--88.5)

Montgomery County, Ohio

773

85.5

1.4

(82.7--88.3)

Stark County, Ohio

827

85.7

1.3

(83.1--88.3)

Summit County, Ohio

2,073

86.6

0.9

(84.8--88.4)

Cleveland County, Oklahoma

454

86.6

1.7

(83.3--89.9)

Oklahoma County, Oklahoma

1,350

81.8

1.3

(79.3--84.3)

Tulsa County, Oklahoma

1,596

82.9

1.2

(80.6--85.2)

Clackamas County, Oregon

458

88.8

1.6

(85.8--91.8)

Multnomah County, Oregon

818

88.6

1.2

(86.2--91.0)

Washington County, Oregon

510

89.0

1.6

(85.9--92.1)

Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

748

84.8

1.6

(81.7--87.9)

Bucks County, Pennsylvania

315

88.3

2.0

(84.3--92.3)

Delaware County, Pennsylvania

308

83.1

2.6

(78.0--88.2)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

1,479

80.5

1.2

(78.2--82.8)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

1,442

79.3

1.9

(75.6--83.0)

Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

454

88.9

1.6

(85.8--92.0)

Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania

1,888

74.3

2.2

(69.9--78.7)

Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania

250

85.4

2.4

(80.6--90.2)

Bristol County, Rhode Island

248

88.2

2.6

(83.2--93.2)

Kent County, Rhode Island

766

89.0

1.2

(86.7--91.3)

Newport County, Rhode Island

400

89.5

1.7

(86.1--92.9)

Providence County, Rhode Island

2,688

83.9

0.9

(82.2--85.6)

Washington County, Rhode Island

582

90.6

1.5

(87.7--93.5)

Aiken County, South Carolina

463

85.7

1.7

(82.5--88.9)

Beaufort County, South Carolina

690

89.0

1.6

(85.9--92.1)

Berkeley County, South Carolina

325

89.0

2.0

(85.1--92.9)

Charleston County, South Carolina

712

88.0

2.2

(83.7--92.3)

Greenville County, South Carolina

593

85.8

1.9

(82.1--89.5)

Horry County, South Carolina

679

83.2

1.8

(79.6--86.8)

Laurens County, South Carolina

274

78.1

3.8

(70.7--85.5)

Orangeburg County, South Carolina

520

80.3

2.1

(76.1--84.5)

Richland County, South Carolina

759

89.6

1.6

(86.5--92.7)

Minnehaha County, South Dakota

689

89.9

1.1

(87.7--92.1)

Pennington County, South Dakota

776

89.9

1.2

(87.6--92.2)

Davidson County, Tennessee

374

84.4

2.7

(79.0--89.8)

Shelby County, Tennessee

326

82.7

2.2

(78.3--87.1)

Bexar County, Texas

1,171

84.0

1.3

(81.5--86.5)

Dallas County, Texas

457

81.8

2.1

(77.7--85.9)

El Paso County, Texas

529

68.5

2.9

(62.7--74.3)

Harris County, Texas

955

81.9

1.5

(78.9--84.9)

Lubbock County, Texas

498

84.6

2.4

(79.9--89.3)

Randall County, Texas

270

84.8

2.4

(80.0--89.6)

Smith County, Texas

498

81.6

2.2

(77.3--85.9)

Tarrant County, Texas

527

84.7

2.0

(80.9--88.5)

Travis County, Texas

538

87.9

1.8

(84.3--91.5)

Wichita County, Texas

429

83.2

2.0

(79.2--87.2)

Davis County, Utah

469

90.2

1.5

(87.2--93.2)

Salt Lake County, Utah

1,617

88.7

0.9

(86.9--90.5)

Summit County, Utah

274

89.8

2.2

(85.6--94.0)

Tooele County, Utah

308

85.6

2.2

(81.3--89.9)

Utah County, Utah

553

91.3

1.3

(88.8--93.8)

Weber County, Utah

434

89.3

1.6

(86.1--92.5)

Chittenden County, Vermont

1,432

92.3

0.7

(90.9--93.7)

Franklin County, Vermont

440

85.9

2.0

(81.9--89.9)

Orange County, Vermont

384

86.8

1.9

(83.0--90.6)

Rutland County, Vermont

710

88.3

1.3

(85.7--90.9)

Washington County, Vermont

670

87.1

1.8

(83.6--90.6)

Windsor County, Vermont

672

88.4

1.5

(85.6--91.2)

Benton County, Washington

406

87.4

1.8

(83.8--91.0)

Chelan County, Washington

580

81.9

2.2

(77.6--86.2)

Clark County, Washington

1,666

88.3

0.9

(86.5--90.1)

Douglas County, Washington

483

83.1

2.7

(77.9--88.3)

Franklin County, Washington

254

76.0

4.6

(67.0--85.0)

See page 21 for footnotes


TABLE 3. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by county --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI§)

King County, Washington

3,530

90.6

0.6

(89.4--91.8)

Kitsap County, Washington

947

86.4

1.5

(83.4--89.4)

Pierce County, Washington

1,775

86.0

1.0

(84.0--88.0)

Snohomish County, Washington

1,682

87.1

1.1

(85.0--89.2)

Spokane County, Washington

1,270

86.3

1.1

(84.1--88.5)

Thurston County, Washington

1,562

86.3

1.2

(84.0--88.6)

Yakima County, Washington

767

81.0

1.8

(77.5--84.5)

Kanawha County, West Virginia

463

74.8

2.3

(70.3--79.3)

Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

1,085

82.3

2.2

(78.0--86.6)

Campbell County, Wyoming

512

86.7

1.7

(83.4--90.0)

Fremont County, Wyoming

622

84.2

1.7

(80.8--87.6)

Laramie County, Wyoming

1,188

87.4

1.1

(85.2--89.6)

Natrona County, Wyoming

1,023

86.3

1.4

(83.6--89.0)

Sweetwater County, Wyoming

523

86.9

1.5

(84.0--89.8)

Median

86.2

Range

68.5--93.2

* Respondents were asked to rate general health as poor, fair, good, very good, or excellent. Respondents were classified into two groups: those who reported fair or poor health, and those with good, very good, or excellent health.

Standard error.

§ Confidence interval.


TABLE 4. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have health care coverage,* by state/territory --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

State/Territory

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI§)

Alabama

6,472

84.0

0.8

(82.4--85.6)

Alaska

2,649

82.9

1.4

(80.3--85.5)

Arizona

6,149

82.2

1.3

(79.7--84.7)

Arkansas

5,679

81.7

0.8

(80.0--83.4)

California

11,584

82.5

0.6

(81.4--83.6)

Colorado

11,738

83.7

0.6

(82.6--84.8)

Connecticut

6,139

91.6

0.6

(90.4--92.8)

Delaware

4,022

93.6

0.7

(92.3--94.9)

District of Columbia

4,232

90.9

0.8

(89.4--92.4)

Florida

10,853

82.5

0.8

(80.9--84.1)

Georgia

5,709

84.0

0.8

(82.5--85.5)

Hawaii

6,437

93.7

0.5

(92.7--94.7)

Idaho

5,099

81.5

0.9

(79.8--83.2)

Illinois

5,155

85.4

0.9

(83.7--87.1)

Indiana

4,883

85.0

0.9

(83.2--86.8)

Iowa

6,001

91.0

0.6

(89.9--92.1)

Kansas

8,613

88.3

0.6

(87.2--89.4)

Kentucky

8,076

85.6

0.7

(84.2--87.0)

Louisiana

6,153

80.5

0.8

(79.0--82.0)

Maine

6,778

88.7

0.6

(87.5--89.9)

Maryland

9,459

87.9

0.6

(86.6--89.2)

Massachusetts

20,537

95.6

0.3

(95.1--96.1)

Michigan

9,426

88.3

0.5

(87.3--89.3)

Minnesota

4,284

91.8

0.7

(90.4--93.2)

Mississippi

7,927

80.6

0.7

(79.2--82.0)

Missouri

5,149

85.5

0.8

(83.9--87.1)

Montana

6,826

82.7

0.8

(81.2--84.2)

Nebraska

16,220

87.7

0.7

(86.4--89.0)

Nevada

4,753

78.8

1.1

(76.6--81.0)

New Hampshire

6,880

89.9

0.5

(88.8--91.0)

New Jersey

11,718

86.2

0.6

(85.1--87.3)

New Mexico

6,216

80.1

0.9

(78.4--81.8)

New York

7,894

87.8

0.7

(86.5--89.1)

North Carolina

15,808

82.2

0.6

(81.1--83.3)

North Dakota

5,010

88.4

0.8

(86.9--89.9)

Ohio

12,927

87.7

0.5

(86.6--88.8)

Oklahoma

7,797

81.1

0.7

(79.8--82.4)

Oregon

4,783

84.0

0.9

(82.3--85.7)

Pennsylvania

13,135

88.5

0.6

(87.3--89.7)

Rhode Island

4,775

89.2

0.7

(87.7--90.7)

South Carolina

10,161

82.4

0.7

(80.9--83.9)

South Dakota

6,959

87.7

0.7

(86.4--89.0)

Tennessee

5,020

83.4

1.1

(81.3--85.5)

Texas

10,687

74.4

0.8

(72.8--76.0)

Utah

5,317

85.4

0.8

(83.8--87.0)

Vermont

6,738

89.4

0.6

(88.3--90.5)

Virginia

5,296

89.5

0.8

(87.9--91.1)

Washington

22,490

86.7

0.4

(85.9--87.5)

West Virginia

4,163

83.8

0.8

(82.2--85.4)

Wisconsin

7,055

89.7

0.7

(88.4--91.0)

Wyoming

7,978

84.4

0.6

(83.2--85.6)

Guam

789

74.7

2.0

(70.9--78.5)

Puerto Rico

4,472

91.7

0.6

(90.5--92.9)

Virgin Islands

2,472

72.4

1.2

(70.0--74.8)

Median

85.5

Range

72.4--95.6

* Includes health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations) or government plans (e.g., Medicare or Medicaid).

Standard error.

§ Confidence interval.


TABLE 5. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have health-care coverage,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI§)

Akron, Ohio

2,241

87.0

1.8

(83.5--90.5)

Albuquerque, New Mexico

1,669

84.0

1.5

(81.1--86.9)

Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey

935

88.1

2.3

(83.5--92.7)

Amarillo, Texas

527

79.8

3.0

(73.9--85.7)

Anchorage, Alaska

550

83.0

2.2

(78.8--87.2)

Asheville, North Carolina

866

82.0

2.1

(78.0--86.0)

Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia

2,297

88.2

1.0

(86.2--90.2)

Atlantic City-Hammonton, New Jersey

522

83.4

2.5

(78.5--88.3)

Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina

865

84.2

2.2

(79.9--88.5)

Augusta-Waterville, Maine

567

86.4

2.2

(82.1--90.7)

Austin-Round Rock, Texas

939

82.7

2.0

(78.8--86.6)

Baltimore-Towson, Maryland

3,471

89.7

0.8

(88.0--91.4)

Bangor, Maine

556

90.2

1.9

(86.5--93.9)

Barnstable Town, Massachusetts

522

95.1

1.3

(92.6--97.6)

Barre, Vermont

671

90.5

1.8

(87.1--93.9)

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

1,026

82.7

1.9

(79.0--86.4)

Berlin, New Hampshire-Vermont

773

82.3

2.0

(78.4--86.2)

Bethesda-Frederick-Gaithersburg, Maryland

1,745

89.9

1.4

(87.1--92.7)

Billings, Montana

574

87.5

2.0

(83.6--91.4)

Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama

1,155

85.5

1.8

(82.0--89.0)

Bismarck, North Dakota

767

92.1

1.4

(89.3--94.9)

Boise City-Nampa, Idaho

1,289

81.3

1.7

(78.1--84.5)

Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts

4,211

95.4

0.6

(94.2--96.6)

Boulder, Colorado

715

85.5

2.1

(81.4--89.6)

Bozeman, Montana

573

83.9

2.6

(78.8--89.0)

Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington

948

87.1

2.0

(83.3--90.9)

Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut

1,796

92.2

1.1

(90.0--94.4)

Buffalo-Niagara Falls, New York

627

91.3

1.7

(88.0--94.6)

Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont

1,958

92.0

1.0

(90.0--94.0)

Butte-Silver Bow, Montana

540

84.0

2.5

(79.0--89.0)

Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts

3,806

96.9

0.5

(95.9--97.9)

Camden, New Jersey

1,637

88.0

1.4

(85.2--90.8)

Canton-Massillon, Ohio

867

89.3

1.5

(86.3--92.3)

Casper, Wyoming

1,024

85.8

1.5

(82.8--88.8)

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

559

91.2

1.6

(88.1--94.3)

Charleston, West Virginia

746

85.3

1.7

(82.0--88.6)

Charleston-North Charleston-Summerville, South Carolina

1,202

85.6

2.0

(81.6--89.6)

Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina

2,055

83.1

1.3

(80.5--85.7)

Cheyenne, Wyoming

1,186

87.5

1.4

(84.8--90.2)

Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin

3,612

84.5

1.1

(82.4--86.6)

Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana

1,817

89.9

1.3

(87.4--92.4)

Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio

1,351

89.1

1.4

(86.4--91.8)

Colorado Springs, Colorado

1,437

87.6

1.4

(84.8--90.4)

Columbia, South Carolina

1,220

85.9

2.0

(81.9--89.9)

Columbus, Ohio

1,676

88.2

1.4

(85.4--91.0)

Concord, New Hampshire

653

89.1

1.7

(85.8--92.4)

Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas

855

78.6

2.1

(74.6--82.6)

Davenport-Moline-Rock Island, Iowa-Illinois

508

90.4

1.9

(86.8--94.0)

Dayton, Ohio

971

89.4

1.8

(85.9--92.9)

Denver-Aurora, Colorado

5,591

85.9

0.7

(84.4--87.4)

Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa

1,017

92.0

1.3

(89.5--94.5)

Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan

2,028

85.9

1.3

(83.4--88.4)

Dover, Delaware

1,398

92.6

1.0

(90.5--94.7)

Durham, North Carolina

914

82.7

2.1

(78.6--86.8)

Edison-New Brunswick, New Jersey

2,240

90.1

1.0

(88.1--92.1)

El Paso, Texas

535

60.5

3.1

(54.5--66.5)

Fairbanks, Alaska

510

87.9

1.9

(84.1--91.7)

Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota

885

94.0

1.3

(91.4--96.6)

Fayetteville, North Carolina

607

82.7

2.4

(78.0--87.4)

Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri

923

81.4

3.6

(74.3--88.5)

Fort Collins-Loveland, Colorado

753

84.8

2.3

(80.2--89.4)

Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas

651

80.2

2.5

(75.4--85.0)

Gillette, Wyoming

512

86.8

1.7

(83.4--90.2)

See page 25 for footnotes


TABLE 5. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have health-care coverage,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI§)

Grand Island, Nebraska

785

86.8

1.7

(83.4--90.2)

Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan

647

89.3

1.7

(85.9--92.7)

Greeley, Colorado

515

83.5

2.4

(78.9--88.1)

Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina

912

85.3

1.9

(81.6--89.0)

Greenville-Mauldin-Easley, South Carolina

966

83.5

2.2

(79.1--87.9)

Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia

687

83.6

2.4

(78.8--88.4)

Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut

1,956

90.9

1.2

(88.5--93.3)

Hastings, Nebraska

641

87.5

1.9

(83.7--91.3)

Hickory-Lenoir-Morganton, North Carolina

924

83.4

1.8

(79.9--86.9)

Hilo, Hawaii

1,439

90.0

1.2

(87.7--92.3)

Hilton Head Island--Beaufort, South Carolina

832

87.3

1.6

(84.1--90.5)

Honolulu, Hawaii

3,001

94.8

0.6

(93.5--96.1)

Houston--Sugar Land--Baytown, Texas

1,453

75.0

1.7

(71.7--78.3)

Huntington--Ashland, West Virginia--Kentucky--Ohio

692

86.9

1.7

(83.5--90.3)

Indianapolis--Carmel, Indiana

1,170

86.8

1.5

(83.8--89.8)

Jackson, Mississippi

808

83.1

2.0

(79.2--87.0)

Jacksonville, Florida

785

87.7

2.1

(83.6--91.8)

Kahului--Wailuku, Hawaii

1,402

92.7

1.1

(90.6--94.8)

Kansas City, Missouri--Kansas

3,321

88.8

1.0

(86.9--90.7)

Kapaa, Hawaii

595

91.5

1.6

(88.3--94.7)

Kennewick--Pasco--Richland, Washington

660

84.3

2.2

(79.9--88.7)

Las Cruces, New Mexico

555

73.2

2.8

(67.6--78.8)

Las Vegas--Paradise, Nevada

1,548

78.5

1.5

(75.5--81.5)

Lebanon, New Hampshire--Vermont

1,886

87.7

1.2

(85.4--90.0)

Lewiston, Idaho--Washington

501

88.2

2.1

(84.1--92.3)

Lincoln, Nebraska

1,199

86.5

2.1

(82.3--90.7)

Little Rock--North Little Rock--Conway, Arkansas

1,244

87.5

1.5

(84.6--90.4)

Los Angeles--Long Beach--Glendale, California

1,511

77.8

1.5

(74.9--80.7)

Louisville/Jefferson County, Kentucky--Indiana

1,036

87.5

1.7

(84.1--90.9)

Lubbock, Texas

519

78.1

3.3

(71.5--84.7)

Manchester--Nashua, New Hampshire

1,474

91.8

0.9

(90.0--93.6)

Memphis, Tennessee--Mississippi--Arkansas

1,094

82.4

2.4

(77.7--87.1)

Miami-Fort Lauderdale--Pompano Beach, Florida

779

83.3

2.1

(79.3--87.3)

Milwaukee--Waukesha--West Allis, Wisconsin

1,415

91.9

1.4

(89.2--94.6)

Minneapolis--St. Paul--Bloomington, Minnesota--Wisconsin

2,522

92.8

0.8

(91.2--94.4)

Minot, North Dakota

549

90.9

1.8

(87.3--94.5)

Mobile, Alabama

585

80.3

3.1

(74.2--86.4)

Montgomery, Alabama

518

88.8

2.2

(84.5--93.1)

Myrtle Beach--North Myrtle Beach--Conway, South Carolina

683

76.2

3.0

(70.4--82.0)

Nashville--Davidson-Murfreesboro---Franklin, Tennessee

777

86.8

2.0

(82.8--90.8)

Nassau--Suffolk, New York

1,074

88.7

1.8

(85.2--92.2)

Newark--Union, New Jersey--Pennsylvania

3,224

83.8

1.2

(81.5--86.1)

New Haven--Milford, Connecticut

1,587

90.3

1.4

(87.6--93.0)

New Orleans--Metairie--Kenner, Louisiana

1,392

80.8

1.5

(77.8--83.8)

New York--White Plains--Wayne, New York--New Jersey

4,757

85.7

0.9

(84.0--87.4)

Norfolk, Nebraska

642

87.5

1.7

(84.1--90.9)

North Platte, Nebraska

551

91.1

1.6

(88.0--94.2)

Oakland--Fremont--Hayward, California

931

92.0

1.2

(89.6--94.4)

Ocean City, New Jersey

508

86.0

2.7

(80.6--91.4)

Ogden--Clearfield, Utah

926

88.7

1.5

(85.7--91.7)

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

2,412

80.5

1.2

(78.2--82.8)

Olympia, Washington

1,566

89.8

1.4

(87.1--92.5)

Omaha--Council Bluffs, Nebraska--Iowa

2,410

87.7

1.3

(85.1--90.3)

Orangeburg, South Carolina

521

78.1

2.7

(72.7--83.5)

Orlando--Kissimmee, Florida

663

83.6

2.4

(79.0--88.2)

Peabody, Massachusetts

2,781

95.6

0.6

(94.3--96.9)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

3,214

88.6

1.3

(86.1--91.1)

Phoenix--Mesa--Scottsdale, Arizona

1,494

81.7

1.9

(78.0--85.4)

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

2,937

90.2

1.2

(87.8--92.6)

Portland--South Portland--Biddeford, Maine

2,061

93.2

0.8

(91.6--94.8)

Portland--Vancouver--Beaverton, Oregon--Washington

3,865

86.5

1.0

(84.5--88.5)

Providence--New Bedford--Fall River, Rhode Island--Massachusetts

8,282

90.4

0.6

(89.2--91.6)

Provo--Orem, Utah

597

85.4

2.3

(80.9--89.9)

See page 25 for footnotes


TABLE 5. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have health-care coverage,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI§)

Raleigh--Cary, North Carolina

1,106

81.5

2.3

(76.9--86.1)

Rapid City, South Dakota

982

84.1

1.7

(80.8--87.4)

Reno--Sparks, Nevada

1,652

79.4

1.5

(76.5--82.3)

Richmond, Virginia

822

92.9

1.3

(90.4--95.4)

Riverside--San Bernardino--Ontario, California

1,354

79.8

1.6

(76.7--82.9)

Riverton, Wyoming

623

80.0

2.6

(75.0--85.0)

Rochester, New York

601

94.7

1.3

(92.2--97.2)

Rockingham County--Strafford County, New Hampshire

1,694

91.4

1.1

(89.3--93.5)

Rock Springs, Wyoming

525

83.4

2.2

(79.0--87.8)

Rutland, Vermont

709

89.6

1.5

(86.6--92.6)

Sacramento--Arden--Arcade--Roseville, California

902

88.0

1.7

(84.7--91.3)

St. Louis, Missouri--Illinois

1,640

88.0

1.3

(85.4--90.6)

Salt Lake City, Utah

2,198

86.2

1.1

(84.1--88.3)

San Antonio, Texas

1,497

79.3

1.7

(75.9--82.7)

San Diego--Carlsbad--San Marcos, California

1,134

83.3

1.6

(80.1--86.5)

San Francisco--San Mateo--Redwood City, California

673

92.8

1.5

(89.9--95.7)

San Jose--Sunnyvale--Santa Clara, California

580

89.4

1.9

(85.6--93.2)

Santa Ana--Anaheim--Irvine, California

965

83.8

1.7

(80.4--87.2)

Santa Fe, New Mexico

516

82.5

2.5

(77.7--87.3)

Scottsbluff, Nebraska

795

81.8

2.0

(77.8--85.8)

Scranton--Wilkes--Barre, Pennsylvania

1,627

90.2

1.8

(86.8--93.6)

Seaford, Delaware

1,262

90.6

1.2

(88.2--93.0)

Seattle--Bellevue--Everett, Washington

5,206

87.9

0.8

(86.4--89.4)

Shreveport--Bossier City, Louisiana

607

81.1

2.1

(77.0--85.2)

Sierra Vista--Douglas, Arizona

524

82.5

2.9

(76.9--88.1)

Sioux City, Iowa--Nebraska--South Dakota

1,216

90.2

1.7

(86.8--93.6)

Sioux Falls, South Dakota

945

92.1

1.3

(89.5--94.7)

Spokane, Washington

1,271

88.6

1.4

(85.8--91.4)

Springfield, Massachusetts

2,642

95.0

0.7

(93.7--96.3)

Tacoma, Washington

1,774

86.9

1.4

(84.1--89.7)

Tallahassee, Florida

625

86.1

2.3

(81.5--90.7)

Tampa--St. Petersburg--Clearwater, Florida

793

84.0

2.1

(80.0--88.0)

Toledo, Ohio

996

91.8

1.5

(88.9--94.7)

Topeka, Kansas

824

90.6

1.4

(87.9--93.3)

Tucson, Arizona

813

86.5

1.9

(82.8--90.2)

Tulsa, Oklahoma

2,258

81.0

1.3

(78.5--83.5)

Tuscaloosa, Alabama

533

84.1

2.8

(78.6--89.6)

Tyler, Texas

500

78.7

2.7

(73.4--84.0)

Virginia Beach--Norfolk--Newport News, Virginia--North Carolina

1,113

87.9

2.2

(83.7--92.1)

Warren--Troy--Farmington Hills, Michigan

1,839

90.5

1.0

(88.6--92.4)

Washington--Arlington--Alexandria, District of Columbia--Virginia--Maryland--West Virginia

6,645

89.4

1.2

(87.1--91.7)

Wenatchee, Washington

1,064

77.2

2.2

(73.0--81.4)

Wichita, Kansas

1,641

89.6

1.1

(87.4--91.8)

Wichita Falls, Texas

532

78.5

3.5

(71.7--85.3)

Wilmington, Delaware--Maryland--New Jersey

1,801

93.8

1.0

(91.9--95.7)

Wilmington, North Carolina

603

85.2

2.5

(80.3--90.1)

Winston--Salem, North Carolina

525

82.7

2.5

(77.8--87.6)

Worcester, Massachusetts

2,508

96.1

0.8

(94.6--97.6)

Yakima, Washington

768

79.5

2.2

(75.1--83.9)

Youngstown--Warren--Boardman, Ohio--Pennsylvania

1,016

84.8

2.5

(79.8--89.8)

Yuma, Arizona

566

76.7

2.5

(71.7--81.7)

Median

86.9

Range

60.5--96.9

* Includes health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations), or government plans (e.g., Medicare or Medicaid).

Standard error.

§ Confidence interval.

Metropolitan division.


TABLE 6. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have health-care coverage,* by county --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI§)

Jefferson County, Alabama

604

84.2

2.3

(79.6--88.8)

Mobile County, Alabama

585

80.3

3.1

(74.2--86.4)

Montgomery County, Alabama

350

90.5

2.6

(85.3--95.7)

Tuscaloosa County, Alabama

445

84.0

3.1

(78.0--90.0)

Anchorage Municipality, Alaska

406

84.2

2.6

(79.0--89.4)

Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska

510

87.9

1.9

(84.1--91.7)

Cochise County, Arizona

524

82.5

2.9

(76.9--88.1)

Maricopa County, Arizona

973

81.8

2.0

(77.9--85.7)

Pima County, Arizona

813

86.5

1.9

(82.8--90.2)

Pinal County, Arizona

521

80.8

3.7

(73.5--88.1)

Yuma County, Arizona

566

76.7

2.5

(71.7--81.7)

Benton County, Arkansas

491

87.9

2.4

(83.2--92.6)

Pulaski County, Arkansas

819

87.0

1.8

(83.4--90.6)

Washington County, Arkansas

386

81.0

3.5

(74.2--87.8)

Alameda County, California

514

90.3

1.9

(86.6--94.0)

Contra Costa County, California

417

94.2

1.4

(91.4--97.0)

Los Angeles County, California

1,511

77.8

1.5

(74.9--80.7)

Orange County, California

965

83.8

1.7

(80.4--87.2)

Riverside County, California

711

79.3

2.3

(74.8--83.8)

Sacramento County, California

559

87.4

2.2

(83.1--91.7)

San Bernardino County, California

643

81.2

2.2

(76.9--85.5)

San Diego County, California

1,134

83.3

1.6

(80.1--86.5)

San Francisco County, California

316

92.9

2.0

(89.0--96.8)

Santa Clara County, California

567

89.5

1.9

(85.7--93.3)

Adams County, Colorado

795

82.7

2.0

(78.7--86.7)

Arapahoe County, Colorado

1,220

86.0

1.8

(82.6--89.4)

Boulder County, Colorado

715

85.5

2.1

(81.4--89.6)

Denver County, Colorado

1,201

77.5

1.9

(73.7--81.3)

Douglas County, Colorado

629

94.1

1.2

(91.8--96.4)

El Paso County, Colorado

1,347

87.9

1.4

(85.1--90.7)

Jefferson County, Colorado

1,465

89.2

1.3

(86.7--91.7)

Larimer County, Colorado

753

84.8

2.3

(80.2--89.4)

Weld County, Colorado

515

83.5

2.4

(78.9--88.1)

Fairfield County, Connecticut

1,796

92.2

1.1

(90.0--94.4)

Hartford County, Connecticut

1,444

91.0

1.4

(88.2--93.8)

New Haven County, Connecticut

1,587

90.3

1.4

(87.6--93.0)

Tolland County, Connecticut

278

90.4

3.3

(83.9--96.9)

Kent County, Delaware

1,398

92.6

1.0

(90.5--94.7)

New Castle County, Delaware

1,362

95.2

1.0

(93.3--97.1)

Sussex County, Delaware

1,262

90.6

1.2

(88.2--93.0)

District of Columbia, District of Columbia

4,232

90.5

0.9

(88.8--92.2)

Duval County, Florida

276

87.6

2.6

(82.5--92.7)

Miami--Dade County, Florida

261

73.8

4.3

(65.4--82.2)

Palm Beach County, Florida

272

88.2

3.3

(81.7--94.7)

Pinellas County, Florida

263

85.3

3.0

(79.4--91.2)

Cobb County, Georgia

286

89.3

2.8

(83.8--94.8)

DeKalb County, Georgia

317

88.2

2.5

(83.2--93.2)

Fulton County, Georgia

335

88.1

2.4

(83.4--92.8)

Hawaii County, Hawaii

1,439

90.0

1.2

(87.7--92.3)

Honolulu County, Hawaii

3,001

94.8

0.6

(93.5--96.1)

Kauai County, Hawaii

595

91.5

1.6

(88.3--94.7)

Maui County, Hawaii

1,402

92.7

1.1

(90.6--94.8)

Ada County, Idaho

639

86.0

2.2

(81.6--90.4)

Canyon County, Idaho

524

76.0

2.6

(70.8--81.2)

Nez Perce County, Idaho

266

88.2

2.4

(83.5--92.9)

Cook County, Illinois

1,689

81.8

1.6

(78.8--84.8)

DuPage County, Illinois

337

90.1

2.5

(85.1--95.1)

Lake County, Indiana

493

83.5

3.1

(77.3--89.7)

Marion County, Indiana

824

85.1

2.0

(81.2--89.0)

Linn County, Iowa

478

92.9

1.5

(90.0--95.8)

Polk County, Iowa

777

90.9

1.5

(87.9--93.9)

Scott County, Iowa

380

89.5

2.4

(84.8--94.2)

Johnson County, Kansas

1,587

92.7

1.0

(90.8--94.6)

See page 30 for footnotes


TABLE 6. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have health-care coverage,* by county --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI§)

Sedgwick County, Kansas

1,265

88.7

1.3

(86.1--91.3)

Shawnee County, Kansas

601

91.6

1.6

(88.4--94.8)

Wyandotte County, Kansas

352

78.5

3.4

(71.9--85.1)

Jefferson County, Kentucky

616

87.9

2.2

(83.5--92.3)

Caddo Parish, Louisiana

416

79.6

2.7

(74.4--84.8)

East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

648

83.6

2.4

(78.9--88.3)

Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

556

83.6

2.2

(79.3--87.9)

Orleans Parish, Louisiana

322

77.8

3.3

(71.3--84.3)

St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana

329

84.6

2.8

(79.2--90.0)

Cumberland County, Maine

1,034

93.0

1.2

(90.7--95.3)

Kennebec County, Maine

567

86.4

2.2

(82.1--90.7)

Penobscot County, Maine

556

90.2

1.9

(86.5--93.9)

Sagadahoc County, Maine

263

94.1

1.8

(90.5--97.7)

York County, Maine

764

93.6

1.1

(91.5--95.7)

Anne Arundel County, Maryland

644

93.1

1.6

(89.9--96.3)

Baltimore County, Maryland

1,030

88.6

1.5

(85.6--91.6)

Calvert County, Maryland

253

90.9

2.5

(86.0--95.8)

Cecil County, Maryland

268

91.1

2.1

(87.0--95.2)

Charles County, Maryland

308

91.1

2.7

(85.8--96.4)

Frederick County, Maryland

585

91.6

2.0

(87.7--95.5)

Harford County, Maryland

292

88.7

2.7

(83.4--94.0)

Howard County, Maryland

372

93.2

1.9

(89.5--96.9)

Montgomery County, Maryland

1,160

89.7

1.7

(86.4--93.0)

Prince George´s County, Maryland

745

81.5

2.3

(77.0--86.0)

Queen Anne´s County, Maryland

311

87.4

3.9

(79.7--95.1)

Washington County, Maryland

442

87.7

2.4

(82.9--92.5)

Baltimore City, Maryland

602

86.3

2.2

(82.0--90.6)

Barnstable County, Massachusetts

522

95.1

1.3

(92.6--97.6)

Bristol County, Massachusetts

3,507

92.9

1.1

(90.8--95.0)

Essex County, Massachusetts

2,781

95.7

0.6

(94.4--97.0)

Franklin County, Massachusetts

268

95.8

1.4

(93.1--98.5)

Hampden County, Massachusetts

2,060

94.4

0.8

(92.8--96.0)

Hampshire County, Massachusetts

314

94.0

2.2

(89.6--98.4)

Middlesex County, Massachusetts

3,806

97.2

0.4

(96.3--98.1)

Norfolk County, Massachusetts

1,151

97.0

0.8

(95.4--98.6)

Plymouth County, Massachusetts

814

97.9

0.5

(96.9--98.9)

Suffolk County, Massachusetts

2,246

91.9

1.3

(89.3--94.5)

Worcester County, Massachusetts

2,508

96.1

0.8

(94.6--97.6)

Kent County, Michigan

472

89.1

2.2

(84.8--93.4)

Macomb County, Michigan

533

90.8

1.6

(87.7--93.9)

Oakland County, Michigan

956

90.9

1.4

(88.1--93.7)

Wayne County, Michigan

2,028

85.9

1.3

(83.4--88.4)

Anoka County, Minnesota

297

94.2

2.0

(90.3--98.1)

Dakota County, Minnesota

317

95.9

1.4

(93.1--98.7)

Hennepin County, Minnesota

855

93.6

1.2

(91.3--95.9)

Ramsey County, Minnesota

407

88.5

2.4

(83.8--93.2)

DeSoto County, Mississippi

304

90.1

2.7

(84.7--95.5)

Hinds County, Mississippi

346

75.9

3.5

(69.1--82.7)

Jackson County, Missouri

517

85.8

2.2

(81.5--90.1)

St. Louis County, Missouri

543

88.5

2.2

(84.1--92.9)

St. Louis City, Missouri

394

79.3

3.0

(73.5--85.1)

Gallatin County, Montana

573

83.9

2.6

(78.8--89.0)

Silver Bow County, Montana

540

84.0

2.5

(79.0--89.0)

Yellowstone County, Montana

523

87.5

2.1

(83.5--91.5)

Adams County, Nebraska

505

86.6

2.3

(82.0--91.2)

Dakota County, Nebraska

712

78.0

2.2

(73.7--82.3)

Douglas County, Nebraska

930

87.9

1.5

(84.9--90.9)

Hall County, Nebraska

540

85.0

2.2

(80.6--89.4)

Lancaster County, Nebraska

873

86.8

2.1

(82.7--90.9)

Lincoln County, Nebraska

517

91.5

1.7

(88.3--94.7)

Madison County, Nebraska

432

87.4

2.2

(83.0--91.8)

Sarpy County, Nebraska

614

95.0

1.4

(92.3--97.7)

Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska

785

82.1

2.0

(78.1--86.1)

See page 30 for footnotes


TABLE 6. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have health-care coverage,* by county --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI§)

Seward County, Nebraska

326

92.3

1.9

(88.5--96.1)

Clark County, Nevada

1,548

78.5

1.5

(75.5--81.5)

Washoe County, Nevada

1,628

79.3

1.5

(76.4--82.2)

Coos County, New Hampshire

689

82.4

2.0

(78.5--86.3)

Grafton County, New Hampshire

831

87.9

1.7

(84.6--91.2)

Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

1,474

91.8

0.9

(90.0--93.6)

Merrimack County, New Hampshire

653

89.1

1.7

(85.8--92.4)

Rockingham County, New Hampshire

1,060

92.3

1.2

(89.9--94.7)

Strafford County, New Hampshire

634

89.4

2.0

(85.5--93.3)

Atlantic County, New Jersey

522

83.4

2.5

(78.5--88.3)

Bergen County, New Jersey

632

89.3

1.9

(85.5--93.1)

Burlington County, New Jersey

549

94.3

1.5

(91.3--97.3)

Camden County, New Jersey

564

82.4

2.6

(77.2--87.6)

Cape May County, New Jersey

508

86.0

2.7

(80.6--91.4)

Essex County, New Jersey

1,033

79.3

1.9

(75.6--83.0)

Gloucester County, New Jersey

524

92.0

2.1

(87.8--96.2)

Hudson County, New Jersey

1,003

79.9

1.7

(76.6--83.2)

Hunterdon County, New Jersey

487

93.2

2.1

(89.1--97.3)

Middlesex County, New Jersey

639

88.7

1.8

(85.1--92.3)

Monmouth County, New Jersey

555

88.9

1.9

(85.1--92.7)

Morris County, New Jersey

686

89.6

2.3

(85.0--94.2)

Ocean County, New Jersey

503

93.0

1.7

(89.6--96.4)

Passaic County, New Jersey

473

81.4

2.7

(76.2--86.6)

Somerset County, New Jersey

543

94.8

1.2

(92.5--97.1)

Sussex County, New Jersey

496

89.5

2.4

(84.8--94.2)

Union County, New Jersey

489

82.2

2.6

(77.0--87.4)

Warren County, New Jersey

492

91.9

1.6

(88.8--95.0)

Bernalillo County, New Mexico

1,056

84.5

1.7

(81.1--87.9)

Dona Ana County, New Mexico

555

73.2

2.8

(67.6--78.8)

Sandoval County, New Mexico

297

88.4

2.7

(83.1--93.7)

Santa Fe County, New Mexico

516

82.5

2.5

(77.7--87.3)

Valencia County, New Mexico

263

82.5

3.5

(75.5--89.5)

Erie County, New York

504

91.6

1.9

(87.9--95.3)

Kings County, New York

575

84.7

2.1

(80.6--88.8)

Monroe County, New York

409

95.5

1.2

(93.1--97.9)

Nassau County, New York

503

89.7

2.2

(85.3--94.1)

New York County, New York

674

87.3

2.2

(83.0--91.6)

Queens County, New York

502

84.5

2.5

(79.6--89.4)

Suffolk County, New York

571

87.6

2.9

(82.0--93.2)

Westchester County, New York

352

90.7

2.4

(86.1--95.3)

Buncombe County, North Carolina

344

84.9

2.7

(79.6--90.2)

Cabarrus County, North Carolina

368

88.4

2.1

(84.2--92.6)

Catawba County, North Carolina

448

84.4

2.4

(79.7--89.1)

Cumberland County, North Carolina

476

82.5

2.7

(77.3--87.7)

Durham County, North Carolina

395

77.8

3.3

(71.3--84.3)

Forsyth County, North Carolina

408

88.4

2.2

(84.1--92.7)

Gaston County, North Carolina

413

79.7

2.9

(74.0--85.4)

Guilford County, North Carolina

424

88.3

2.4

(83.7--92.9)

Henderson County, North Carolina

289

77.1

4.1

(69.0--85.2)

Johnston County, North Carolina

471

82.9

2.5

(78.0--87.8)

Mecklenburg County, North Carolina

678

85.4

2.0

(81.5--89.3)

New Hanover County, North Carolina

371

86.4

3.3

(79.9--92.9)

Orange County, North Carolina

379

88.5

2.8

(83.0--94.0)

Randolph County, North Carolina

398

83.8

3.2

(77.6--90.0)

Union County, North Carolina

409

83.1

3.4

(76.4--89.8)

Wake County, North Carolina

585

82.6

2.6

(77.5--87.7)

Burleigh County, North Dakota

561

92.0

1.8

(88.4--95.6)

Cass County, North Dakota

830

92.3

1.4

(89.5--95.1)

Ward County, North Dakota

462

91.5

2.0

(87.6--95.4)

Cuyahoga County, Ohio

824

88.4

1.5

(85.4--91.4)

Franklin County, Ohio

796

87.2

2.0

(83.4--91.0)

Hamilton County, Ohio

824

92.4

1.4

(89.7--95.1)

Lucas County, Ohio

788

91.5

1.4

(88.8--94.2)

See page 30 for footnotes


TABLE 6. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have health-care coverage,* by county --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI§)

Mahoning County, Ohio

791

84.2

2.6

(79.2--89.2)

Montgomery County, Ohio

785

90.0

1.5

(87.0--93.0)

Stark County, Ohio

832

89.3

1.6

(86.2--92.4)

Summit County, Ohio

2,097

89.1

1.0

(87.2--91.0)

Cleveland County, Oklahoma

455

87.7

2.8

(82.3--93.1)

Oklahoma County, Oklahoma

1,355

75.8

1.7

(72.6--79.0)

Tulsa County, Oklahoma

1,597

82.0

1.4

(79.2--84.8)

Clackamas County, Oregon

460

89.1

2.2

(84.9--93.3)

Multnomah County, Oregon

817

85.9

2.1

(81.8--90.0)

Washington County, Oregon

509

84.7

2.7

(79.5--89.9)

Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

746

92.7

1.5

(89.8--95.6)

Bucks County, Pennsylvania

315

92.4

2.0

(88.6--96.2)

Delaware County, Pennsylvania

308

90.0

3.0

(84.1--95.9)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

1,479

86.4

1.3

(83.8--89.0)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

1,438

90.0

1.7

(86.7--93.3)

Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

454

94.0

1.5

(91.1--96.9)

Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania

1,889

83.1

2.6

(78.0--88.2)

Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania

250

90.4

2.6

(85.3--95.5)

Bristol County, Rhode Island

251

95.2

1.5

(92.2--98.2)

Kent County, Rhode Island

780

90.7

1.6

(87.6--93.8)

Newport County, Rhode Island

408

92.1

2.1

(88.0--96.2)

Providence County, Rhode Island

2,746

87.0

1.1

(84.9--89.1)

Washington County, Rhode Island

590

94.2

1.2

(91.8--96.6)

Aiken County, South Carolina

466

88.7

2.2

(84.4--93.0)

Beaufort County, South Carolina

690

89.2

1.6

(86.0--92.4)

Berkeley County, South Carolina

326

86.5

3.1

(80.4--92.6)

Charleston County, South Carolina

718

83.6

3.5

(76.7--90.5)

Greenville County, South Carolina

595

84.1

2.6

(79.0--89.2)

Horry County, South Carolina

683

76.2

3.0

(70.4--82.0)

Laurens County, South Carolina

275

81.2

4.4

(72.6--89.8)

Orangeburg County, South Carolina

521

78.1

2.7

(72.7--83.5)

Richland County, South Carolina

765

84.6

3.1

(78.5--90.7)

Minnehaha County, South Dakota

690

92.1

1.6

(89.0--95.2)

Pennington County, South Dakota

774

85.0

1.9

(81.3--88.7)

Davidson County, Tennessee

375

84.7

3.2

(78.5--90.9)

Shelby County, Tennessee

328

81.7

3.4

(75.1--88.3)

Bexar County, Texas

1,179

78.3

1.9

(74.7--81.9)

Dallas County, Texas

460

74.1

2.9

(68.3--79.9)

El Paso County, Texas

535

60.5

3.1

(54.5--66.5)

Harris County, Texas

959

72.6

2.1

(68.4--76.8)

Lubbock County, Texas

504

77.7

3.5

(70.9--84.5)

Randall County, Texas

268

88.7

2.6

(83.7--93.7)

Smith County, Texas

500

78.7

2.7

(73.4--84.0)

Tarrant County, Texas

529

81.8

2.7

(76.5--87.1)

Travis County, Texas

539

82.9

2.6

(77.8--88.0)

Wichita County, Texas

435

79.7

3.1

(73.6--85.8)

Davis County, Utah

467

92.5

1.5

(89.6--95.4)

Salt Lake County, Utah

1,618

86.1

1.2

(83.8--88.4)

Summit County, Utah

272

87.4

2.7

(82.0--92.8)

Tooele County, Utah

308

87.8

2.4

(83.0--92.6)

Utah County, Utah

554

85.4

2.4

(80.7--90.1)

Weber County, Utah

434

83.7

2.7

(78.4--89.0)

Chittenden County, Vermont

1,430

93.3

1.2

(91.0--95.6)

Franklin County, Vermont

440

89.8

2.0

(85.8--93.8)

Orange County, Vermont

384

88.9

2.0

(84.9--92.9)

Rutland County, Vermont

709

89.6

1.5

(86.6--92.6)

Washington County, Vermont

671

90.5

1.8

(87.1--93.9)

Windsor County, Vermont

671

89.1

1.8

(85.7--92.5)

Benton County, Washington

406

89.6

2.4

(85.0--94.2)

Chelan County, Washington

579

78.9

2.7

(73.7--84.1)

Clark County, Washington

1,664

86.6

1.3

(84.0--89.2)

Douglas County, Washington

485

74.3

3.4

(67.7--80.9)

Franklin County, Washington

254

69.8

4.8

(60.4--79.2)

See page 30 for footnotes


TABLE 6. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have health-care coverage,* by county --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI§)

King County, Washington

3,527

90.0

0.8

(88.5-91.5)

Kitsap County, Washington

948

87.1

2.0

(83.3-90.9)

Pierce County, Washington

1,774

87.1

1.4

(84.3-89.9)

Snohomish County, Washington

1,679

85.7

1.5

(82.8-88.6)

Spokane County, Washington

1,271

88.6

1.4

(85.8-91.4)

Thurston County, Washington

1,566

89.8

1.4

(87.1-92.5)

Yakima County, Washington

768

79.5

2.2

(75.1-83.9)

Kanawha County, West Virginia

464

86.5

2.1

(82.3-90.7)

Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

1,086

90.4

2.0

(86.5-94.3)

Campbell County, Wyoming

512

86.8

1.7

(83.4-90.2)

Fremont County, Wyoming

623

80.0

2.6

(75.0-85.0)

Laramie County, Wyoming

1,186

87.5

1.4

(84.8-90.2)

Natrona County, Wyoming

1,024

85.8

1.5

(82.8-88.8)

Sweetwater County, Wyoming

525

83.4

2.2

(79.0-87.8)

Median

87.9

Range

60.5-97.9

* Includes health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations), or government plans (e.g., Medicare or Medicaid).

† Standard error.

§ Confidence interval.


TABLE 7. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who have had all their natural teeth extracted, by state/territory --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

State/Territory

Sample size

%

SE*

(95% CI)

Alabama

1,883

26.0

1.3

(23.4--28.6)

Alaska

349

20.7

3.0

(14.8--26.6)

Arizona

2,172

13.5

1.2

(11.1--15.9)

Arkansas

1,846

23.1

1.1

(20.9--25.3)

California

3,181

10.1

0.7

(8.8--11.4)

Colorado

2,920

15.0

0.8

(13.4--16.6)

Connecticut

1,895

13.2

1.0

(11.2--15.2)

Delaware

1,163

16.7

1.3

(14.2--19.2)

District of Columbia

1,085

15.9

1.4

(13.2--18.6)

Florida

3,658

16.7

1.0

(14.8--18.6)

Georgia

1,573

23.1

1.4

(20.4--25.8)

Hawaii

1,610

9.6

0.9

(7.9--11.3)

Idaho

1,360

17.3

1.1

(15.0--19.6)

Illinois

1,519

19.1

1.2

(16.7--21.5)

Indiana

1,323

21.7

1.4

(19.0--24.4)

Iowa

1,790

18.5

1.0

(16.5--20.5)

Kansas

2,561

20.5

0.9

(18.8--22.2)

Kentucky

2,323

23.7

1.1

(21.5--25.9)

Louisiana

1,525

23.2

1.3

(20.7--25.7)

Maine

1,988

21.9

1.1

(19.8--24.0)

Maryland

2,509

12.4

0.9

(10.7--14.1)

Massachusetts

5,355

18.3

0.7

(16.9--19.7)

Michigan

2,763

15.6

0.8

(14.0--17.2)

Minnesota

1,245

13.0

1.0

(11.0--15.0)

Mississippi

2,495

27.3

1.0

(25.2--29.4)

Missouri

1,545

26.2

1.4

(23.5--28.9)

Montana

2,074

18.7

1.0

(16.7--20.7)

Nebraska

5,136

17.2

0.9

(15.5--18.9)

Nevada

1,278

17.7

1.6

(14.5--20.9)

New Hampshire

1,887

18.5

1.0

(16.5--20.5)

New Jersey

3,159

17.2

0.9

(15.5--18.9)

New Mexico

1,729

18.1

1.1

(15.9--20.3)

New York

2,326

17.0

1.0

(15.0--19.0)

North Carolina

4,624

21.3

0.8

(19.8--22.8)

North Dakota

1,498

20.1

1.1

(17.9--22.3)

Ohio

3,992

20.8

0.8

(19.2--22.4)

Oklahoma

2,514

26.8

1.0

(24.7--28.9)

Oregon

1,403

16.0

1.1

(13.8--18.2)

Pennsylvania

3,980

21.5

0.9

(19.7--23.3)

Rhode Island

1,380

17.7

1.2

(15.4--20.0)

South Carolina

3,127

22.7

1.1

(20.6--24.8)

South Dakota

2,262

18.6

1.0

(16.7--20.5)

Tennessee

1,565

31.5

1.5

(28.6--34.4)

Texas

3,242

17.5

0.9

(15.6--19.4)

Utah

1,128

13.9

1.2

(11.6--16.2)

Vermont

1,770

19.8

1.1

(17.7--21.9)

Virginia

1,513

14.6

1.1

(12.4--16.8)

Washington

6,438

13.8

0.5

(12.8--14.8)

West Virginia

1,185

37.8

1.5

(34.8--40.8)

Wisconsin

1,857

14.5

1.2

(12.1--16.9)

Wyoming

2,168

19.1

0.9

(17.3--20.9)

Guam

86

N/A§

N/A

(N/A)

Puerto Rico

1,536

22.0

1.2

(19.7--24.3)

Virgin Islands

397

14.0

2.0

(10.1--17.9)

Median

18.5

Range

9.6--37.8

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the confidence interval half width is >10.


TABLE 8. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who have had all their natural teeth extracted, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE*

(95% CI)

Akron, Ohio

719

18.8

2.0

(14.9--22.7)

Albuquerque, New Mexico

462

13.0

1.7

(9.6--16.4)

Allentown--Bethlehem--Easton, Pennsylvania--New Jersey

261

17.0

3.3

(10.5--23.5)

Amarillo, Texas

175

19.0

3.1

(12.8--25.2)

Anchorage, Alaska

80

20.1

5.0

(10.3--29.9)

Asheville, North Carolina

319

19.7

2.3

(15.2--24.2)

Atlanta--Sandy Springs--Marietta, Georgia

556

18.6

2.2

(14.3--22.9)

Atlantic City--Hammonton, New Jersey

158

19.5

3.7

(12.2--26.8)

Augusta--Richmond County, Georgia--South Carolina

263

17.5

3.3

(11.1--23.9)

Augusta--Waterville, Maine

172

21.0

3.2

(14.8--27.2)

Austin--Round Rock, Texas

222

8.7

2.1

(4.6--12.8)

Baltimore--Towson, Maryland

878

13.9

1.4

(11.1--16.7)

Bangor, Maine

153

25.8

3.8

(18.4--33.2)

Barnstable Town, Massachusetts

219

10.2

2.2

(5.8--14.6)

Barre, Vermont

158

26.1

3.9

(18.4--33.8)

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

232

18.2

2.9

(12.4--24.0)

Berlin, New Hampshire--Vermont

253

26.6

3.1

(20.4--32.8)

Bethesda--Frederick--Gaithersburg, Maryland§

439

5.2

1.3

(2.6--7.8)

Billings, Montana

191

21.3

3.2

(15.0--27.6)

Birmingham--Hoover, Alabama

304

23.3

2.8

(17.8--28.8)

Bismarck, North Dakota

218

19.1

3.0

(13.2--25.0)

Boise City--Nampa, Idaho

322

11.6

2.0

(7.8--15.4)

Boston--Quincy, Massachusetts§

1,065

16.9

1.4

(14.2--19.6)

Boulder, Colorado

162

8.5

2.4

(3.8--13.2)

Bozeman, Montana

137

9.9

2.5

(5.0--14.8)

Bremerton--Silverdale, Washington

275

12.6

2.2

(8.4--16.8)

Bridgeport--Stamford--Norwalk, Connecticut

564

10.5

1.9

(6.8--14.2)

Buffalo--Niagara Falls, New York

234

15.7

2.6

(10.6--20.8)

Burlington--South Burlington, Vermont

463

16.8

1.9

(13.1--20.5)

Butte--Silver Bow, Montana

189

24.3

3.5

(17.5--31.1)

Cambridge--Newton--Framingham, Massachusetts§

988

15.3

1.4

(12.5--18.1)

Camden, New Jersey§

458

17.5

2.1

(13.3--21.7)

Canton--Massillon, Ohio

287

21.5

2.7

(16.2--26.8)

Casper, Wyoming

313

18.9

2.4

(14.1--23.7)

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

170

8.5

2.0

(4.5--12.5)

Charleston, West Virginia

190

34.2

3.7

(26.9--41.5)

Charleston--North Charleston--Summerville, South Carolina

341

17.0

3.1

(11.0--23.0)

Charlotte--Gastonia--Concord, North Carolina--South Carolina

561

18.5

2.0

(14.5--22.5)

Cheyenne, Wyoming

311

16.2

2.4

(11.5--20.9)

Chicago--Naperville--Joliet, Illinois--Indiana--Wisconsin

942

16.2

1.6

(13.0--19.4)

Cincinnati--Middletown, Ohio--Kentucky--Indiana

533

25.2

2.5

(20.3--30.1)

Cleveland--Elyria--Mentor, Ohio

434

15.9

2.0

(12.0--19.8)

Colorado Springs, Colorado

325

16.8

2.5

(11.9--21.7)

Columbia, South Carolina

336

18.4

2.9

(12.7--24.1)

Columbus, Ohio

417

12.4

1.8

(8.9--15.9)

Concord, New Hampshire

174

18.1

3.2

(11.7--24.5)

Dallas--Plano--Irving, Texas§

224

16.3

2.9

(10.6--22.0)

Davenport--Moline--Rock Island, Iowa--Illinois

146

16.9

3.9

(9.3--24.5)

Dayton, Ohio

322

24.8

3.0

(19.0--30.6)

Denver--Aurora, Colorado

1,339

13.1

1.0

(11.1--15.1)

Des Moines--West Des Moines, Iowa

251

14.7

2.5

(9.7--19.7)

Detroit--Livonia--Dearborn, Michigan§

601

21.3

2.3

(16.8--25.8)

Dover, Delaware

389

24.5

2.4

(19.8--29.2)

Durham, North Carolina

232

13.8

3.6

(6.8--20.8)

Edison--New Brunswick, New Jersey§

656

13.6

1.5

(10.6--16.6)

El Paso, Texas

133

17.3

3.7

(10.0--24.6)

Fairbanks, Alaska

65

N/A§

N/A

(N/A)

Fargo, North Dakota--Minnesota

247

16.5

5.0

(6.7--26.3)

Fayetteville, North Carolina

143

21.7

4.1

(13.7--29.7)

Fayetteville--Springdale--Rogers, Arkansas--Missouri

269

25.8

3.8

(18.4--33.2)

Fort Collins--Loveland, Colorado

208

7.0

1.6

(3.8--10.2)

Fort Worth--Arlington, Texas§

199

14.1

2.7

(8.8--19.4)

Gillette, Wyoming

71

N/A

N/A

(N/A)

See page 34 for footnotes


TABLE 8. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who have had all their natural teeth extracted, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE*

(95% CI)

Grand Island, Nebraska

257

20.3

2.7

(15.0--25.6)

Grand Rapids--Wyoming, Michigan

183

16.9

3.0

(11.1--22.7)

Greeley, Colorado

101

9.5

3.0

(3.6--15.4)

Greensboro--High Point, North Carolina

267

22.9

3.3

(16.5--29.3)

Greenville--Mauldin--Easley, South Carolina

324

20.2

3.0

(14.3--26.1)

Hagerstown--Martinsburg, Maryland--West Virginia

197

23.7

3.9

(16.0--31.4)

Hartford--West Hartford--East Hartford, Connecticut

586

11.5

1.5

(8.6--14.4)

Hastings, Nebraska

203

16.8

2.8

(11.3--22.3)

Hickory--Lenoir--Morganton, North Carolina

263

28.0

3.5

(21.0--35.0)

Hilo, Hawaii

341

9.7

1.9

(6.0--13.4)

Hilton Head Island--Beaufort, South Carolina

290

8.8

1.8

(5.3--12.3)

Honolulu, Hawaii

806

8.8

1.1

(6.6--11.0)

Houston--Sugar Land--Baytown, Texas

371

15.4

2.2

(11.2--19.6)

Huntington--Ashland, West Virginia--Kentucky--Ohio

226

36.3

3.7

(29.0--43.6)

Indianapolis--Carmel, Indiana

275

17.2

2.7

(11.9--22.5)

Jackson, Mississippi

247

20.0

2.8

(14.5--25.5)

Jacksonville, Florida

216

19.0

3.9

(11.3--26.7)

Kahului--Wailuku, Hawaii

328

11.8

2.4

(7.1--16.5)

Kansas City, Missouri--Kansas

909

17.1

1.5

(14.1--20.1)

Kapaa, Hawaii

135

10.5

3.1

(4.4--16.6)

Kennewick--Pasco--Richland, Washington

157

17.6

3.3

(11.2--24.0)

Las Cruces, New Mexico

149

15.1

3.2

(8.8--21.4)

Las Vegas--Paradise, Nevada

398

17.6

2.2

(13.2--22.0)

Lebanon, New Hampshire--Vermont

522

19.4

1.9

(15.7--23.1)

Lewiston, Idaho--Washington

164

22.0

3.4

(15.3--28.7)

Lincoln, Nebraska

322

13.4

2.3

(8.8--18.0)

Little Rock--North Little Rock--Conway, Arkansas

394

15.4

2.1

(11.2--19.6)

Los Angeles--Long Beach--Glendale, California§

369

9.4

1.8

(6.0--12.8)

Louisville/Jefferson County, Kentucky--Indiana

284

19.8

3.0

(13.9--25.7)

Lubbock, Texas

165

19.2

3.6

(12.1--26.3)

Manchester--Nashua, New Hampshire

350

17.2

2.2

(13.0--21.4)

Memphis, Tennessee--Mississippi--Arkansas

295

34.1

4.1

(26.0--42.2)

Miami--Fort Lauderdale--Pompano Beach, Florida

265

14.1

2.5

(9.2--19.0)

Milwaukee--Waukesha--West Allis, Wisconsin

285

13.6

3.1

(7.6--19.6)

Minneapolis--St. Paul--Bloomington, Minnesota--Wisconsin

620

8.1

1.1

(5.9--10.3)

Minot, North Dakota

148

24.3

3.9

(16.7--31.9)

Mobile, Alabama

170

20.0

3.5

(13.1--26.9)

Montgomery, Alabama

149

25.3

4.7

(16.1--34.5)

Myrtle Beach--North Myrtle Beach--Conway, South Carolina

240

21.5

2.8

(15.9--27.1)

Nashville--Davidson--Murfreesboro--Franklin, Tennessee

225

25.1

3.5

(18.3--31.9)

Nassau--Suffolk, New York§

323

14.2

2.4

(9.4--19.0)

Newark--Union, New Jersey--Pennsylvania§

786

17.1

1.8

(13.6--20.6)

New Haven--Milford, Connecticut

507

14.2

2.0

(10.3--18.1)

New Orleans--Metairie--Kenner, Louisiana

338

18.7

2.5

(13.8--23.6)

New York--White Plains--Wayne, New York--New Jersey§

1,200

13.4

1.3

(10.8--16.0)

Norfolk, Nebraska

201

27.9

3.5

(20.9--34.9)

North Platte, Nebraska

178

19.2

3.7

(11.9--26.5)

Oakland--Fremont--Hayward, California§

252

11.2

2.4

(6.5--15.9)

Ocean City, New Jersey

206

19.8

2.9

(14.0--25.6)

Ogden--Clearfield, Utah

194

15.9

2.8

(10.4--21.4)

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

653

24.7

1.9

(21.0--28.4)

Olympia, Washington

421

11.9

1.7

(8.6--15.2)

Omaha--Council Bluffs, Nebraska--Iowa

565

15.4

1.9

(11.6--19.2)

Orangeburg, South Carolina

153

30.4

4.4

(21.9--38.9)

Orlando--Kissimmee, Florida

188

17.6

4.1

(9.6--25.6)

Peabody, Massachusetts§

684

16.6

2.2

(12.3--20.9)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§

907

14.2

1.7

(11.0--17.4)

Phoenix--Mesa--Scottsdale, Arizona

498

12.7

1.9

(8.9--16.5)

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

927

24.5

2.1

(20.5--28.5)

Portland--South Portland--Biddeford, Maine

606

15.3

1.6

(12.1--18.5)

Portland--Vancouver--Beaverton, Oregon--Washington

952

14.0

1.4

(11.2--16.8)

Providence--New Bedford--Fall River, Rhode Island--Massachusetts

2,363

19.1

1.1

(17.0--21.2)

Provo--Orem, Utah

96

9.4

2.9

(3.7--15.1)

See page 34 for footnotes


TABLE 8. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who have had all their natural teeth extracted, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE*

(95% CI)

Raleigh--Cary, North Carolina

219

11.8

2.8

(6.4--17.2)

Rapid City, South Dakota

281

13.8

2.1

(9.7--17.9)

Reno--Sparks, Nevada

410

15.3

2.1

(11.2--19.4)

Richmond, Virginia

230

11.9

2.3

(7.3--16.5)

Riverside--San Bernardino--Ontario, California

344

10.8

1.8

(7.3--14.3)

Riverton, Wyoming

218

19.9

2.9

(14.3--25.5)

Rochester, New York

180

12.6

2.6

(7.4--17.8)

Rockingham County--Strafford County, New Hampshire§

428

16.2

2.0

(12.3--20.1)

Rock Springs, Wyoming

88

N/A

N/A

(N/A)

Rutland, Vermont

207

16.7

3.1

(10.7--22.7)

Sacramento--Arden--Arcade--Roseville, California

244

11.2

2.2

(6.9--15.5)

St. Louis, Missouri--Illinois

481

21.6

2.2

(17.2--26.0)

Salt Lake City, Utah

452

13.7

1.8

(10.2--17.2)

San Antonio, Texas

461

16.9

2.0

(13.1--20.7)

San Diego--Carlsbad--San Marcos, California

333

8.0

1.8

(4.5--11.5)

San Francisco--San Mateo--Redwood City, California§

197

7.6

2.1

(3.5--11.7)

San Jose--Sunnyvale--Santa Clara, California

151

6.9

2.1

(2.8--11.0)

Santa Ana--Anaheim--Irvine, California§

294

6.3

1.7

(3.0--9.6)

Santa Fe, New Mexico

149

11.5

2.9

(5.8--17.2)

Scottsbluff, Nebraska

268

17.6

2.5

(12.7--22.5)

Scranton--Wilkes--Barre, Pennsylvania

512

24.5

3.6

(17.4--31.6)

Seaford, Delaware

449

17.7

2.0

(13.8--21.6)

Seattle--Bellevue--Everett, Washington§

1,348

11.3

1.1

(9.2--13.4)

Shreveport--Bossier City, Louisiana

177

16.2

3.1

(10.1--22.3)

Sierra Vista--Douglas, Arizona

193

22.0

3.3

(15.4--28.6)

Sioux City, Iowa--Nebraska--South Dakota

369

21.7

3.6

(14.6--28.8)

Sioux Falls, South Dakota

286

17.5

2.4

(12.8--22.2)

Spokane, Washington

343

15.7

2.1

(11.5--19.9)

Springfield, Massachusetts

663

19.7

2.0

(15.7--23.7)

Tacoma, Washington§

459

14.1

1.9

(10.4--17.8)

Tallahassee, Florida

147

16.4

5.1

(6.4--26.4)

Tampa--St. Petersburg--Clearwater, Florida

296

19.6

2.6

(14.5--24.7)

Toledo, Ohio

289

14.5

2.1

(10.3--18.7)

Topeka, Kansas

231

24.4

3.0

(18.4--30.4)

Tucson, Arizona

314

11.2

1.9

(7.5--14.9)

Tulsa, Oklahoma

713

26.9

2.2

(22.7--31.1)

Tuscaloosa, Alabama

148

22.8

3.9

(15.2--30.4)

Tyler, Texas

189

16.5

2.9

(10.9--22.1)

Virginia Beach--Norfolk--Newport News, Virginia--North Carolina

322

18.8

2.6

(13.7--23.9)

Warren--Troy--Farmington Hills, Michigan§

540

10.6

1.6

(7.5--13.7)

Washington--Arlington--Alexandria, District of Columbia--Virginia--Maryland--West Virginia§

1,590

10.1

1.5

(7.3--12.9)

Wenatchee, Washington

368

18.8

2.4

(14.1--23.5)

Wichita, Kansas

476

17.7

1.9

(13.9--21.5)

Wichita Falls, Texas

187

18.3

3.2

(12.0--24.6)

Wilmington, Delaware--Maryland--New Jersey§

422

17.6

2.2

(13.4--21.8)

Wilmington, North Carolina

214

14.0

2.5

(9.0--19.0)

Winston--Salem, North Carolina

150

24.3

4.1

(16.4--32.2)

Worcester, Massachusetts

609

24.1

2.6

(19.1--29.1)

Yakima, Washington

235

15.9

2.6

(10.9--20.9)

Youngstown--Warren--Boardman, Ohio--Pennsylvania

344

22.8

3.3

(16.4--29.2)

Yuma, Arizona

201

14.2

2.7

(8.9--19.5)

Median

16.9

Range

5.2--36.3

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Metropolitan division.

Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the confidence interval half width is >10.


TABLE 9. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who have had all their natural teeth extracted, by county --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

County

Sample size

%

SE*

95% CI

Jefferson County, Alabama

175

21.4

3.6

(14.4--28.4)

Mobile County, Alabama

170

20.0

3.5

(13.1--26.9)

Montgomery County, Alabama

98

N/A

N/A

(N/A)

Tuscaloosa County, Alabama

128

21.9

4.1

(13.9--29.9)

Anchorage Municipality, Alaska

59

N/A§

N/A

(N/A)

Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska

65

N/A

N/A

(N/A)

Cochise County, Arizona

193

22.0

3.3

(15.4--28.6)

Maricopa County, Arizona

299

12.0

2.1

(7.9--16.1)

Pima County, Arizona

314

11.2

1.9

(7.5--14.9)

Pinal County, Arizona

199

18.7

4.8

(9.3--28.1)

Benton County, Arkansas

149

20.8

4.0

(12.9--28.7)

Pulaski County, Arkansas

273

12.6

2.3

(8.2--17.0)

Washington County, Arkansas

109

N/A

N/A

(N/A)

Alameda County, California

142

11.6

3.3

(5.1--18.1)

Contra Costa County, California

110

11.3

3.3

(4.8--17.8)

Los Angeles County, California

369

9.4

1.8

(6.0--12.8)

Orange County, California

294

6.3

1.7

(3.0--9.6)

Riverside County, California

204

9.0

2.0

(5.0--13.0)

Sacramento County, California

149

9.8

2.6

(4.8--14.8)

San Bernardino County, California

140

13.5

3.5

(6.7--20.3)

San Diego County, California

333

8.0

1.8

(4.5--11.5)

San Francisco County, California

85

13.4

4.2

(5.1--21.7)

Santa Clara County, California

148

7.2

2.2

(3.0--11.4)

Adams County, Colorado

179

21.9

3.4

(15.3--28.5)

Arapahoe County, Colorado

315

11.0

2.1

(6.9--15.1)

Boulder County, Colorado

162

8.5

2.4

(3.8--13.2)

Denver County, Colorado

337

14.9

2.2

(10.5--19.3)

Douglas County, Colorado

81

N/A

N/A

(N/A)

El Paso County, Colorado

306

16.7

2.6

(11.7--21.7)

Jefferson County, Colorado

375

11.6

1.8

(8.1--15.1)

Larimer County, Colorado

208

7.0

1.6

(3.8--10.2)

Weld County, Colorado

101

9.5

3.0

(3.6--15.4)

Fairfield County, Connecticut

564

10.5

1.9

(6.8--14.2)

Hartford County, Connecticut

438

12.1

1.8

(8.6--15.6)

New Haven County, Connecticut

507

14.2

2.0

(10.3--18.1)

Tolland County, Connecticut

77

7.3

3.0

(1.4--13.2)

Kent County, Delaware

389

24.5

2.4

(19.8--29.2)

New Castle County, Delaware

325

12.8

1.9

(9.1--16.5)

Sussex County, Delaware

449

17.7

2.0

(13.8--21.6)

District of Columbia, District of Columbia

1,085

15.6

1.4

(12.9--18.3)

Duval County, Florida

86

N/A

N/A

(N/A)

Miami--Dade County, Florida

81

12.9

3.8

(5.5--20.3)

Palm Beach County, Florida

120

12.6

3.5

(5.7--19.5)

Pinellas County, Florida

100

17.2

4.3

(8.8--25.6)

Cobb County, Georgia

59

N/A

N/A

(N/A)

DeKalb County, Georgia

77

10.1

3.7

(2.8--17.4)

Fulton County, Georgia

81

N/A

N/A

(N/A)

Hawaii County, Hawaii

341

9.7

1.9

(6.0--13.4)

Honolulu County, Hawaii

806

8.8

1.1

(6.6--11.0)

Kauai County, Hawaii

135

10.5

3.1

(4.4--16.6)

Maui County, Hawaii

328

11.8

2.4

(7.1--16.5)

Ada County, Idaho

146

9.0

2.6

(3.8--14.2)

Canyon County, Idaho

145

15.4

3.4

(8.6--22.2)

Nez Perce County, Idaho

87

23.0

4.8

(13.7--32.3)

Cook County, Illinois

475

14.9

2.2

(10.6--19.2)

DuPage County, Illinois

81

9.3

3.8

(1.9--16.7)

Lake County, Indiana

114

N/A

N/A

(N/A)

Marion County, Indiana

189

20.1

3.8

(12.6--27.6)

Linn County, Iowa

148

9.3

2.3

(4.7--13.9)

Polk County, Iowa

193

16.5

3.0

(10.5--22.5)

Scott County, Iowa

102

18.7

4.1

(10.7--26.7)

Johnson County, Kansas

395

8.6

1.5

(5.7--11.5)

Sedgwick County, Kansas

352

18.1

2.3

(13.5--22.7)

See page 39 for footnotes


TABLE 9. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who have had all their natural teeth extracted, by county --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

County

Sample size

%

SE*

95% CI

Shawnee County, Kansas

164

23.4

3.7

(16.2--30.6)

Wyandotte County, Kansas

83

22.6

4.6

(13.6--31.6)

Jefferson County, Kentucky

195

14.0

2.7

(8.7--19.3)

Caddo Parish, Louisiana

132

12.5

3.0

(6.5--18.5)

East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

148

16.8

3.7

(9.5--24.1)

Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

147

16.1

3.4

(9.3--22.9)

Orleans Parish, Louisiana

88

22.4

5.1

(12.4--32.4)

St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana

66

N/A

N/A

(N/A)

Cumberland County, Maine

301

13.9

2.3

(9.4--18.4)

Kennebec County, Maine

172

21.0

3.2

(14.8--27.2)

Penobscot County, Maine

153

25.8

3.8

(18.4--33.2)

Sagadahoc County, Maine

78

16.0

4.5

(7.1--24.9)

York County, Maine

227

17.8

2.8

(12.3--23.3)

Anne Arundel County, Maryland

165

10.1

2.5

(5.2--15.0)

Baltimore County, Maryland

288

12.8

2.3

(8.4--17.2)

Calvert County, Maryland

57

N/A

N/A

(N/A)

Cecil County, Maryland

58

N/A

N/A

(N/A)

Charles County, Maryland

84

13.8

5.0

(4.0--23.6)

Frederick County, Maryland

128

11.5

3.7

(4.2--18.8)

Harford County, Maryland

69

12.2

4.3

(3.8--20.6)

Howard County, Maryland

69

N/A

N/A

(N/A)

Montgomery County, Maryland

311

4.2

1.4

(1.4--7.0)

Prince George´s County, Maryland

153

10.4

2.8

(4.9--15.9)

Queen Anne´s County, Maryland

88

12.2

4.3

(3.8--20.6)

Washington County, Maryland

136

14.7

3.2

(8.4--21.0)

Baltimore City, Maryland

142

18.5

3.7

(11.2--25.8)

Barnstable County, Massachusetts

219

10.2

2.2

(5.8--14.6)

Bristol County, Massachusetts

983

24.3

2.5

(19.3--29.3)

Essex County, Massachusetts

684

16.0

2.0

(12.0--20.0)

Franklin County, Massachusetts

64

16.8

4.6

(7.7--25.9)

Hampden County, Massachusetts

527

22.1

2.6

(17.0--27.2)

Hampshire County, Massachusetts

72

15.4

4.5

(6.7--24.1)

Middlesex County, Massachusetts

988

15.3

1.4

(12.5--18.1)

Norfolk County, Massachusetts

330

12.9

2.0

(9.0--16.8)

Plymouth County, Massachusetts

219

13.9

2.8

(8.4--19.4)

Suffolk County, Massachusetts

516

24.3

2.5

(19.5--29.1)

Worcester County, Massachusetts

609

24.1

2.6

(19.1--29.1)

Kent County, Michigan

128

15.4

3.4

(8.8--22.0)

Macomb County, Michigan

151

12.6

2.8

(7.1--18.1)

Oakland County, Michigan

290

9.0

2.3

(4.5--13.5)

Wayne County, Michigan

601

21.3

2.3

(16.8--25.8)

Anoka County, Minnesota

76

13.1

4.2

(4.9--21.3)

Dakota County, Minnesota

85

6.5

2.9

(0.8--12.2)

Hennepin County, Minnesota

210

8.2

2.0

(4.2--12.2)

Ramsey County, Minnesota

111

6.6

2.5

(1.6--11.6)

DeSoto County, Mississippi

89

16.7

4.0

(8.8--24.6)

Hinds County, Mississippi

114

16.4

3.8

(8.9--23.9)

Jackson County, Missouri

167

19.6

3.3

(13.2--26.0)

St. Louis County, Missouri

174

19.2

3.6

(12.2--26.2)

St. Louis City, Missouri

103

N/A

N/A

(N/A)

Gallatin County, Montana

137

9.9

2.5

(5.0--14.8)

Silver Bow County, Montana

189

24.3

3.5

(17.5--31.1)

Yellowstone County, Montana

173

22.4

3.5

(15.5--29.3)

Adams County, Nebraska

167

16.7

3.0

(10.8--22.6)

Dakota County, Nebraska

209

27.6

3.3

(21.2--34.0)

Douglas County, Nebraska

214

15.9

2.8

(10.4--21.4)

Hall County, Nebraska

161

22.2

3.6

(15.2--29.2)

Lancaster County, Nebraska

229

13.4

2.5

(8.5--18.3)

Lincoln County, Nebraska

166

18.2

3.9

(10.6--25.8)

Madison County, Nebraska

131

23.2

4.1

(15.2--31.2)

Sarpy County, Nebraska

120

10.6

3.4

(3.9--17.3)

Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska

268

17.6

2.5

(12.7--22.5)

Seward County, Nebraska

93

13.8

3.9

(6.2--21.4)

See page 39 for footnotes


TABLE 9. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who have had all their natural teeth extracted, by county --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

County

Sample size

%

SE*

95% CI

Clark County, Nevada

398

17.6

2.2

(13.2--22.0)

Washoe County, Nevada

406

15.3

2.1

(11.2--19.4)

Coos County, New Hampshire

219

28.4

3.3

(22.0--34.8)

Grafton County, New Hampshire

240

17.8

2.7

(12.4--23.2)

Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

350

17.2

2.2

(13.0--21.4)

Merrimack County, New Hampshire

174

18.1

3.2

(11.7--24.5)

Rockingham County, New Hampshire

260

15.9

2.5

(11.0--20.8)

Strafford County, New Hampshire

168

16.7

3.0

(10.8--22.6)

Atlantic County, New Jersey

158

19.5

3.7

(12.2--26.8)

Bergen County, New Jersey

178

9.4

3.1

(3.4--15.4)

Burlington County, New Jersey

163

13.2

2.9

(7.4--19.0)

Camden County, New Jersey

159

17.9

3.3

(11.5--24.3)

Cape May County, New Jersey

206

19.8

2.9

(14.0--25.6)

Essex County, New Jersey

254

24.7

3.3

(18.2--31.2)

Gloucester County, New Jersey

136

20.3

3.9

(12.7--27.9)

Hudson County, New Jersey

198

26.9

3.8

(19.4--34.4)

Hunterdon County, New Jersey

114

11.6

3.2

(5.4--17.8)

Middlesex County, New Jersey

170

14.3

3.3

(7.9--20.7)

Monmouth County, New Jersey

150

14.7

3.4

(8.1--21.3)

Morris County, New Jersey

179

11.7

2.7

(6.4--17.0)

Ocean County, New Jersey

207

13.9

2.5

(9.1--18.7)

Passaic County, New Jersey

123

19.1

3.9

(11.4--26.8)

Somerset County, New Jersey

129

10.7

3.7

(3.5--17.9)

Sussex County, New Jersey

107

13.2

3.4

(6.5--19.9)

Union County, New Jersey

124

11.2

3.0

(5.3--17.1)

Warren County, New Jersey

142

23.5

4.1

(15.6--31.4)

Bernalillo County, New Mexico

316

11.8

2.0

(7.9--15.7)

Dona Ana County, New Mexico

149

15.1

3.2

(8.8--21.4)

Sandoval County, New Mexico

66

N/A

N/A

(N/A)

Santa Fe County, New Mexico

149

11.5

2.9

(5.8--17.2)

Valencia County, New Mexico

68

13.9

4.7

(4.7--23.1)

Erie County, New York

175

15.6

3.1

(9.6--21.6)

Kings County, New York

117

17.1

4.0

(9.3--24.9)

Monroe County, New York

122

13.0

3.4

(6.4--19.6)

Nassau County, New York

150

13.8

3.1

(7.7--19.9)

New York County, New York

210

6.7

2.4

(1.9--11.5)

Queens County, New York

140

14.6

3.3

(8.0--21.2)

Suffolk County, New York

173

13.0

2.7

(7.6--18.4)

Westchester County, New York

104

4.9

2.1

(0.8--9.0)

Buncombe County, North Carolina

105

16.5

3.6

(9.4--23.6)

Cabarrus County, North Carolina

98

22.4

5.1

(12.4--32.4)

Catawba County, North Carolina

112

23.8

4.8

(14.5--33.1)

Cumberland County, North Carolina

122

20.5

4.3

(12.1--28.9)

Durham County, North Carolina

98

6.6

2.3

(2.1--11.1)

Forsyth County, North Carolina

116

21.3

4.1

(13.3--29.3)

Gaston County, North Carolina

130

21.2

3.9

(13.5--28.9)

Guilford County, North Carolina

131

23.3

4.5

(14.5--32.1)

Henderson County, North Carolina

128

12.3

2.9

(6.6--18.0)

Johnston County, North Carolina

96

23.2

4.7

(13.9--32.5)

Mecklenburg County, North Carolina

183

17.5

3.2

(11.2--23.8)

New Hanover County, North Carolina

128

18.4

3.8

(10.9--25.9)

Orange County, North Carolina

100

11.5

3.2

(5.3--17.7)

Randolph County, North Carolina

110

N/A

N/A

(N/A)

Union County, North Carolina

89

17.4

4.3

(9.0--25.8)

Wake County, North Carolina

112

9.0

2.8

(3.5--14.5)

Burleigh County, North Dakota

158

17.2

3.2

(10.8--23.6)

Cass County, North Dakota

231

10.6

2.1

(6.5--14.7)

Ward County, North Dakota

121

26.6

4.4

(17.9--35.3)

Cuyahoga County, Ohio

271

15.1

2.4

(10.4--19.8)

Franklin County, Ohio

195

8.3

2.3

(3.8--12.8)

Hamilton County, Ohio

263

21.5

2.8

(16.1--26.9)

Lucas County, Ohio

225

19.6

2.9

(14.0--25.2)

Mahoning County, Ohio

269

21.1

2.8

(15.7--26.5)

See page 39 for footnotes


TABLE 9. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who have had all their natural teeth extracted, by county --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

County

Sample size

%

SE*

95% CI

Montgomery County, Ohio

266

21.8

2.8

(16.3--27.3)

Stark County, Ohio

276

22.1

2.8

(16.5--27.7)

Summit County, Ohio

674

19.7

1.7

(16.4--23.0)

Cleveland County, Oklahoma

109

21.3

4.3

(12.8--29.8)

Oklahoma County, Oklahoma

379

25.2

2.5

(20.3--30.1)

Tulsa County, Oklahoma

516

22.0

2.5

(17.2--26.8)

Clackamas County, Oregon

116

18.4

4.0

(10.6--26.2)

Multnomah County, Oregon

201

13.9

2.7

(8.6--19.2)

Washington County, Oregon

107

10.2

3.1

(4.1--16.3)

Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

250

19.6

2.8

(14.2--25.0)

Bucks County, Pennsylvania

111

15.5

4.7

(6.2--24.8)

Delaware County, Pennsylvania

97

13.3

4.0

(5.4--21.2)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

442

34.2

2.9

(28.6--39.8)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

455

23.9

4.2

(15.6--32.2)

Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

125

10.2

2.8

(4.7--15.7)

Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania

505

20.4

3.1

(14.3--26.5)

Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania

79

18.9

4.3

(10.5--27.3)

Bristol County, Rhode Island

90

14.5

4.1

(6.4--22.6)

Kent County, Rhode Island

209

17.3

3.2

(11.1--23.5)

Newport County, Rhode Island

137

6.4

2.0

(2.5--10.3)

Providence County, Rhode Island

755

21.4

1.6

(18.2--24.6)

Washington County, Rhode Island

189

13.8

3.1

(7.8--19.8)

Aiken County, South Carolina

152

15.7

3.2

(9.3--22.1)

Beaufort County, South Carolina

258

8.8

1.9

(5.1--12.5)

Berkeley County, South Carolina

80

N/A

N/A

N/A

Charleston County, South Carolina

223

11.2

2.8

(5.7--16.7)

Greenville County, South Carolina

205

17.1

3.2

(10.9--23.3)

Horry County, South Carolina

240

21.5

2.8

(15.9--27.1)

Laurens County, South Carolina

91

N/A

N/A

N/A

Orangeburg County, South Carolina

153

30.4

4.4

(21.9--38.9)

Richland County, South Carolina

213

17.5

3.8

(10.1--24.9)

Minnehaha County, South Dakota

208

14.8

2.6

(9.6--20.0)

Pennington County, South Dakota

224

14.7

2.4

(9.9--19.5)

Davidson County, Tennessee

132

23.0

4.2

(14.9--31.1)

Shelby County, Tennessee

97

N/A

N/A

N/A

Bexar County, Texas

345

14.8

2.1

(10.6--19.0)

Dallas County, Texas

126

16.6

3.7

(9.4--23.8)

El Paso County, Texas

133

17.3

3.7

(10.0--24.6)

Harris County, Texas

245

11.0

2.4

(6.3--15.7)

Lubbock County, Texas

160

19.3

3.7

(12.1--26.5)

Randall County, Texas

98

10.0

3.2

(3.7--16.3)

Smith County, Texas

189

16.5

2.9

(10.9--22.1)

Tarrant County, Texas

145

14.2

3.1

(8.1--20.3)

Travis County, Texas

124

9.8

3.0

(3.8--15.8)

Wichita County, Texas

157

18.4

3.6

(11.4--25.4)

Davis County, Utah

86

13.9

4.2

(5.7--22.1)

Salt Lake County, Utah

353

13.3

1.9

(9.6--17.0)

Summit County, Utah

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Tooele County, Utah

57

N/A

N/A

N/A

Utah County, Utah

85

8.1

2.9

(2.3--13.9)

Weber County, Utah

103

18.4

3.9

(10.8--26.0)

Chittenden County, Vermont

331

13.7

2.1

(9.6--17.8)

Franklin County, Vermont

111

28.4

4.6

(19.4--37.4)

Orange County, Vermont

69

N/A

N/A

N/A

Rutland County, Vermont

207

16.7

3.1

(10.7--22.7)

Washington County, Vermont

158

26.1

3.9

(18.4--33.8)

Windsor County, Vermont

213

18.5

2.8

(13.0--24.0)

Benton County, Washington

105

15.9

3.7

(8.6--23.2)

Chelan County, Washington

197

17.4

3.0

(11.5--23.3)

Clark County, Washington

417

13.5

1.8

(9.9--17.1)

Douglas County, Washington

171

21.5

3.8

(14.0--29.0)

Franklin County, Washington

52

N/A

N/A

N/A

King County, Washington

928

9.5

1.0

(7.5--11.5)

See page 39 for footnotes


TABLE 9. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who have had all their natural teeth extracted, by county --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

County

Sample size

%

SE*

95% CI

Kitsap County, Washington

275

12.6

2.2

(8.4--16.8)

Pierce County, Washington

459

13.3

1.8

(9.8--16.8)

Snohomish County, Washington

420

15.9

1.8

(12.3--19.5)

Spokane County, Washington

343

15.7

2.1

(11.5--19.9)

Thurston County, Washington

421

11.9

1.7

(8.6--15.2)

Yakima County, Washington

235

15.9

2.6

(10.9--20.9)

Kanawha County, West Virginia

132

33.2

4.4

(24.6--41.8)

Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

209

16.8

4.6

(7.9--25.7)

Campbell County, Wyoming

71

N/A

N/A

(N/A)

Fremont County, Wyoming

218

19.9

2.9

(14.3--25.5)

Laramie County, Wyoming

311

16.2

2.4

(11.5--20.9)

Natrona County, Wyoming

313

18.9

2.4

(14.1--23.7)

Sweetwater County, Wyoming

88

N/A

N/A

(N/A)

Median

15.6

Range

4.2--34.2

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the confidence interval half width is >10.


TABLE 10. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months, by state/territory --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

State/Territory

Sample size

%

SE*

95% CI

Alabama

6,391

71.9

0.9

(70.0--73.8)

Alaska

2,583

59.8

1.6

(56.8--62.8)

Arizona

6,066

67.5

1.4

(64.7--70.3)

Arkansas

5,623

62.7

1.0

(60.8--64.6)

California

11,579

65.2

0.6

(63.9--66.5)

Colorado

11,562

59.7

0.6

(58.5--60.9)

Connecticut

6,090

68.6

0.9

(66.8--70.4)

Delaware

4,005

80.7

1.0

(78.8--82.6)

District of Columbia

4,204

73.1

1.0

(71.2--75.0)

Florida

10,713

74.9

0.9

(73.2--76.6)

Georgia

5,675

75.9

0.9

(74.1--77.7)

Hawaii

6,362

65.2

0.9

(63.5--66.9)

Idaho

5,089

55.6

1.0

(53.6--57.6)

Illinois

5,144

65.2

1.0

(63.3--67.1)

Indiana

4,856

62.6

1.1

(60.5--64.7)

Iowa

5,930

68.7

0.8

(67.1--70.3)

Kansas

8,503

70.8

0.7

(69.4--72.2)

Kentucky

8,032

63.6

0.9

(61.8--65.4)

Louisiana

6,099

78.7

0.8

(77.2--80.2)

Maine

6,761

71.9

0.8

(70.4--73.4)

Maryland

9,398

69.7

0.7

(68.3--71.1)

Massachusetts

20,424

79.0

0.5

(78.0--80.0)

Michigan

9,321

67.7

0.7

(66.3--69.1)

Minnesota

4,280

70.4

1.0

(68.5--72.3)

Mississippi

7,812

65.7

0.8

(64.1--67.3)

Missouri

5,100

63.5

1.1

(61.4--65.6)

Montana

6,753

60.3

0.9

(58.5--62.1)

Nebraska

15,994

61.0

0.8

(59.3--62.7)

Nevada

4,718

60.8

1.2

(58.5--63.1)

New Hampshire

6,841

71.3

0.8

(69.8--72.8)

New Jersey

11,621

76.4

0.6

(75.1--77.7)

New Mexico

6,166

61.8

1.0

(59.9--63.7)

New York

7,868

72.2

0.8

(70.7--73.7)

North Carolina

15,611

72.0

0.6

(70.8--73.2)

North Dakota

4,990

63.2

1.0

(61.3--65.1)

Ohio

12,755

65.7

0.7

(64.4--67.0)

Oklahoma

7,621

57.9

0.8

(56.4--59.4)

Oregon

4,699

60.8

1.0

(58.9--62.7)

Pennsylvania

13,100

69.5

0.7

(68.1--70.9)

Rhode Island

4,759

79.1

0.9

(77.3--80.9)

South Carolina

10,012

67.4

0.8

(65.7--69.1)

South Dakota

6,865

64.8

0.9

(63.0--66.6)

Tennessee

4,978

76.1

1.0

(74.2--78.0)

Texas

10,587

64.9

0.9

(63.2--66.6)

Utah

5,215

55.5

1.0

(53.6--57.4)

Vermont

6,720

66.3

0.8

(64.8--67.8)

Virginia

5,215

67.9

1.2

(65.5--70.3)

Washington

22,083

62.0

0.5

(61.0--63.0)

West Virginia

4,132

76.2

0.9

(74.5--77.9)

Wisconsin

7,048

66.4

1.0

(64.4--68.4)

Wyoming

7,959

58.0

0.7

(56.6--59.4)

Guam

785

73.4

1.9

(69.6--77.2)

Puerto Rico

4,360

77.9

0.9

(76.1--79.7)

Virgin Islands

2,466

67.3

1.3

(64.8--69.8)

Median

67.4

Range

55.5--80.7

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.


TABLE 11. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE*

95% CI

Akron, Ohio

2,207

65.0

2.0

(61.1--68.9)

Albuquerque, New Mexico

1,661

63.6

1.7

(60.3--66.9)

Allentown--Bethlehem--Easton, Pennsylvania--New Jersey

930

62.2

2.8

(56.8--67.6)

Amarillo, Texas

517

60.9

3.3

(54.4--67.4)

Anchorage, Alaska

541

60.8

2.5

(55.8--65.8)

Asheville, North Carolina

855

69.5

2.4

(64.9--74.1)

Atlanta--Sandy Springs--Marietta, Georgia

2,281

74.5

1.5

(71.6--77.4)

Atlantic City--Hammonton, New Jersey

522

79.8

2.5

(75.0--84.6)

Augusta--Richmond County, Georgia--South Carolina

855

72.7

2.4

(68.0--77.4)

Augusta-Waterville, Maine

566

74.0

2.4

(69.2--78.8)

Austin--Round Rock, Texas

937

65.7

2.2

(61.4--70.0)

Baltimore--Towson, Maryland

3,449

70.3

1.1

(68.2--72.4)

Bangor, Maine

555

69.8

2.7

(64.4--75.2)

Barnstable Town, Massachusetts

515

79.1

2.5

(74.3--83.9)

Barre, Vermont

667

63.5

2.4

(58.8--68.2)

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

1,019

76.7

2.0

(72.8--80.6)

Berlin, New Hampshire--Vermont

770

68.3

2.4

(63.6--73.0)

Bethesda--Frederick--Gaithersburg, Maryland

1,736

68.7

1.6

(65.5--71.9)

Billings, Montana

570

60.9

2.9

(55.3--66.5)

Birmingham--Hoover, Alabama

1,147

74.4

2.0

(70.5--78.3)

Bismarck, North Dakota

769

59.0

2.3

(54.5--63.5)

Boise City--Nampa, Idaho

1,285

56.3

1.8

(52.7--59.9)

Boston--Quincy, Massachusetts

4,193

80.0

1.0

(78.0--82.0)

Boulder, Colorado

707

57.0

2.5

(52.0--62.0)

Bozeman, Montana

563

55.0

3.1

(48.9--61.1)

Bremerton--Silverdale, Washington

933

65.3

2.1

(61.2--69.4)

Bridgeport--Stamford--Norwalk, Connecticut

1,774

67.6

1.8

(64.0--71.2)

Buffalo--Niagara Falls, New York

624

73.9

2.6

(68.7--79.1)

Burlington--South Burlington, Vermont

1,955

65.5

1.5

(62.5--68.5)

Butte--Silver Bow, Montana

532

61.6

2.9

(55.8--67.4)

Cambridge--Newton--Framingham, Massachusetts

3,780

77.0

1.2

(74.6--79.4)

Camden, New Jersey

1,627

77.1

1.6

(74.0--80.2)

Canton--Massillon, Ohio

858

68.7

2.2

(64.4--73.0)

Casper, Wyoming

1,027

56.3

2.1

(52.3--60.3)

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

552

64.5

2.6

(59.3--69.7)

Charleston, West Virginia

736

77.1

1.9

(73.4--80.8)

Charleston--North Charleston--Summerville, South Carolina

1,189

71.4

2.2

(67.2--75.6)

Charlotte--Gastonia--Concord, North Carolina--South Carolina

2,027

67.6

1.6

(64.4--70.8)

Cheyenne, Wyoming

1,183

59.8

1.9

(56.1--63.5)

Chicago--Naperville--Joliet, Illinois--Indiana--Wisconsin

3,605

66.1

1.2

(63.8--68.4)

Cincinnati--Middletown, Ohio--Kentucky--Indiana

1,801

63.0

1.7

(59.7--66.3)

Cleveland--Elyria--Mentor, Ohio

1,338

67.1

1.8

(63.6--70.6)

Colorado Springs, Colorado

1,409

61.9

1.8

(58.4--65.4)

Columbia, South Carolina

1,202

70.1

2.4

(65.3--74.9)

Columbus, Ohio

1,657

65.6

1.8

(62.1--69.1)

Concord, New Hampshire

648

71.0

2.4

(66.4--75.6)

Dallas--Plano--Irving, Texas

845

67.2

2.3

(62.8--71.6)

Davenport--Moline--Rock Island, Iowa--Illinois

501

63.7

4.0

(55.8--71.6)

Dayton, Ohio

959

68.5

2.2

(64.2--72.8)

Denver--Aurora, Colorado

5,520

61.6

0.9

(59.9--63.3)

Des Moines--West Des Moines, Iowa

1,004

69.7

1.8

(66.1--73.3)

Detroit--Livonia--Dearborn, Michigan

2,006

70.0

1.6

(66.9--73.1)

Dover, Delaware

1,392

80.0

1.5

(77.1--82.9)

Durham, North Carolina

906

71.9

2.3

(67.4--76.4)

Edison--New Brunswick, New Jersey

2,220

77.8

1.3

(75.3--80.3)

El Paso, Texas

533

63.3

3.1

(57.2--69.4)

Fairbanks, Alaska

498

63.5

2.6

(58.4--68.6)

Fargo, North Dakota--Minnesota

882

62.9

3.6

(55.8--70.0)

Fayetteville, North Carolina

594

74.1

2.6

(69.0--79.2)

Fayetteville--Springdale--Rogers, Arkansas--Missouri

912

55.1

3.2

(48.8--61.4)

Fort Collins--Loveland, Colorado

741

57.7

2.6

(52.5--62.9)

Fort Worth--Arlington, Texas

649

66.9

3.0

(61.0--72.8)

Gillette, Wyoming

510

59.6

2.5

(54.6--64.6)

See page 43 for footnotes


TABLE 11. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE*

95% CI

Grand Island, Nebraska

777

60.5

2.3

(55.9--65.1)

Grand Rapids--Wyoming, Michigan

641

69.1

2.3

(64.6--73.6)

Greeley, Colorado

507

58.7

2.9

(53.0--64.4)

Greensboro--High Point, North Carolina

897

73.1

2.2

(68.9--77.3)

Greenville--Mauldin--Easley, South Carolina

953

67.3

2.5

(62.3--72.3)

Hagerstown--Martinsburg, Maryland--West Virginia

681

73.2

2.4

(68.5--77.9)

Hartford--West Hartford--East Hartford, Connecticut

1,941

70.1

1.6

(67.0--73.2)

Hastings, Nebraska

626

59.3

2.5

(54.4--64.2)

Hickory--Lenoir--Morganton, North Carolina

909

74.0

2.0

(70.0--78.0)

Hilo, Hawaii

1,427

60.4

1.7

(57.0--63.8)

Hilton Head Island--Beaufort, South Carolina

826

66.6

2.4

(61.8--71.4)

Honolulu, Hawaii

2,967

67.1

1.1

(64.9--69.3)

Houston--Sugar Land--Baytown, Texas

1,439

64.9

1.9

(61.3--68.5)

Huntington--Ashland, West Virginia--Kentucky--Ohio

688

77.0

2.2

(72.8--81.2)

Indianapolis--Carmel, Indiana

1,165

64.4

2.1

(60.4--68.4)

Jackson, Mississippi

800

69.7

2.4

(65.1--74.3)

Jacksonville, Florida

776

73.3

3.0

(67.4--79.2)

Kahului--Wailuku, Hawaii

1,379

61.1

1.9

(57.3--64.9)

Kansas City, Missouri--Kansas

3,288

68.2

1.3

(65.6--70.8)

Kapaa, Hawaii

589

59.7

2.6

(54.6--64.8)

Kennewick--Pasco--Richland, Washington

647

66.5

2.7

(61.1--71.9)

Las Cruces, New Mexico

551

57.3

2.9

(51.5--63.1)

Las Vegas--Paradise, Nevada

1,537

61.1

1.6

(58.0--64.2)

Lebanon, New Hampshire--Vermont

1,882

72.5

1.4

(69.9--75.1)

Lewiston, Idaho--Washington

497

58.8

3.0

(53.0--64.6)

Lincoln, Nebraska

1,187

56.0

2.4

(51.2--60.8)

Little Rock--North Little Rock--Conway, Arkansas

1,234

66.9

2.0

(63.0--70.8)

Los Angeles--Long Beach--Glendale, California§

1,511

68.6

1.6

(65.5--71.7)

Louisville/Jefferson County, Kentucky--Indiana

1,026

66.7

2.1

(62.5--70.9)

Lubbock, Texas

509

60.8

3.3

(54.4--67.2)

Manchester--Nashua, New Hampshire

1,467

72.0

1.5

(69.1--74.9)

Memphis, Tennessee--Mississippi--Arkansas

1,084

78.0

2.1

(73.9--82.1)

Miami--Fort Lauderdale--Pompano Beach, Florida

770

79.9

2.0

(75.9--83.9)

Milwaukee--Waukesha--West Allis, Wisconsin

1,415

69.6

2.5

(64.8--74.4)

Minneapolis--St. Paul--Bloomington, Minnesota--Wisconsin

2,520

70.6

1.2

(68.2--73.0)

Minot, North Dakota

543

70.3

2.5

(65.5--75.1)

Mobile, Alabama

580

70.7

3.1

(64.5--76.9)

Montgomery, Alabama

511

74.3

3.7

(67.0--81.6)

Myrtle Beach--North Myrtle Beach--Conway, South Carolina

663

59.9

3.0

(54.0--65.8)

Nashville--Davidson--Murfreesboro--Franklin, Tennessee

768

73.6

2.5

(68.7--78.5)

Nassau--Suffolk, New York§

1,069

69.9

2.0

(66.0--73.8)

Newark--Union, New Jersey--Pennsylvania§

3,193

73.8

1.3

(71.2--76.4)

New Haven--Milford, Connecticut

1,578

67.2

2.1

(63.1--71.3)

New Orleans--Metairie--Kenner, Louisiana

1,382

78.4

1.6

(75.3--81.5)

New York--White Plains--Wayne, New York--New Jersey§

4,727

75.2

1.0

(73.3--77.1)

Norfolk, Nebraska

633

55.3

2.5

(50.4--60.2)

North Platte, Nebraska

542

59.2

2.7

(53.9--64.5)

Oakland--Fremont--Hayward, California§

933

63.0

2.2

(58.8--67.2)

Ocean City, New Jersey

503

78.8

2.8

(73.3--84.3)

Ogden--Clearfield, Utah

906

57.2

2.0

(53.2--61.2)

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

2,367

56.8

1.4

(54.1--59.5)

Olympia, Washington

1,535

62.0

1.7

(58.6--65.4)

Omaha--Council Bluffs, Nebraska--Iowa

2,390

66.6

1.6

(63.5--69.7)

Orangeburg, South Carolina

513

75.9

2.7

(70.7--81.1)

Orlando--Kissimmee, Florida

655

71.6

2.9

(65.9--77.3)

Peabody, Massachusetts§

2,772

80.4

1.4

(77.6--83.2)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§

3,205

72.7

1.4

(70.0--75.4)

Phoenix--Mesa--Scottsdale, Arizona

1,472

66.8

2.1

(62.7--70.9)

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

2,929

69.6

1.6

(66.5--72.7)

Portland--South Portland--Biddeford, Maine

2,059

72.9

1.4

(70.2--75.6)

Portland--Vancouver--Beaverton, Oregon--Washington

3,792

60.7

1.2

(58.3--63.1)

Providence--New Bedford--Fall River, Rhode Island--Massachusetts

8,247

79.2

0.8

(77.7--80.7)

Provo--Orem, Utah

583

50.9

2.9

(45.3--56.5)

See page 43 for footnotes


TABLE 11. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE*

95% CI

Raleigh--Cary, North Carolina

1,093

74.9

2.1

(70.7--79.1)

Rapid City, South Dakota

972

62.3

2.0

(58.3--66.3)

Reno--Sparks, Nevada

1,637

60.4

1.6

(57.3--63.5)

Richmond, Virginia

807

67.2

2.6

(62.2--72.2)

Riverside--San Bernardino--Ontario, California

1,352

63.2

1.8

(59.7--66.7)

Riverton, Wyoming

620

58.9

2.7

(53.6--64.2)

Rochester, New York

600

69.6

2.5

(64.8--74.4)

Rockingham County--Strafford County, New Hampshire§

1,682

72.4

1.5

(69.5--75.3)

Rock Springs, Wyoming

522

59.3

2.6

(54.2--64.4)

Rutland, Vermont

711

65.2

2.3

(60.7--69.7)

Sacramento--Arden--Arcade--Roseville, California

900

65.7

2.1

(61.6--69.8)

St. Louis, Missouri--Illinois

1,628

66.0

1.8

(62.5--69.5)

Salt Lake City, Utah

2,163

57.2

1.4

(54.4--60.0)

San Antonio, Texas

1,486

62.7

2.0

(58.8--66.6)

San Diego--Carlsbad--San Marcos, California

1,134

64.4

1.9

(60.7--68.1)

San Francisco--San Mateo--Redwood City, California§

672

64.5

2.5

(59.7--69.3)

San Jose--Sunnyvale--Santa Clara, California

580

62.3

2.6

(57.1--67.5)

Santa Ana--Anaheim--Irvine, California§

964

67.0

2.0

(63.1--70.9)

Santa Fe, New Mexico

515

65.0

3.0

(59.2--70.8)

Scottsbluff, Nebraska

777

56.9

2.3

(52.5--61.3)

Scranton--Wilkes--Barre, Pennsylvania

1,623

74.9

2.1

(70.7--79.1)

Seaford, Delaware

1,255

80.6

1.6

(77.5--83.7)

Seattle--Bellevue--Everett, Washington§

5,134

63.4

1.0

(61.5--65.3)

Shreveport--Bossier City, Louisiana

600

85.0

2.0

(81.1--88.9)

Sierra Vista--Douglas, Arizona

518

67.4

3.0

(61.5--73.3)

Sioux City, Iowa--Nebraska--South Dakota

1,200

71.2

2.8

(65.7--76.7)

Sioux Falls, South Dakota

936

64.5

2.1

(60.3--68.7)

Spokane, Washington

1,243

61.4

2.0

(57.6--65.2)

Springfield, Massachusetts

2,616

79.0

1.4

(76.3--81.7)

Tacoma, Washington§

1,747

61.7

1.7

(58.5--64.9)

Tallahassee, Florida

620

82.9

3.0

(77.0--88.8)

Tampa--St. Petersburg--Clearwater, Florida

787

72.5

2.4

(67.8--77.2)

Toledo, Ohio

986

68.1

2.3

(63.5--72.7)

Topeka, Kansas

807

72.6

1.9

(68.8--76.4)

Tucson, Arizona

803

68.8

2.5

(64.0--73.6)

Tulsa, Oklahoma

2,224

57.7

1.4

(54.9--60.5)

Tuscaloosa, Alabama

526

72.5

3.3

(66.0--79.0)

Tyler, Texas

494

69.4

2.9

(63.7--75.1)

Virginia Beach--Norfolk--Newport News, Virginia--North Carolina

1,096

68.9

2.5

(64.0--73.8)

Warren--Troy--Farmington Hills, Michigan§

1,817

69.5

1.5

(66.6--72.4)

Washington--Arlington--Alexandria, District of Columbia--Virginia--Maryland--West Virginia§

6,594

69.9

1.8

(66.3--73.5)

Wenatchee, Washington

1,045

61.6

2.2

(57.2--66.0)

Wichita, Kansas

1,633

69.6

1.6

(66.5--72.7)

Wichita Falls, Texas

526

70.5

3.2

(64.2--76.8)

Wilmington, Delaware--Maryland--New Jersey§

1,789

79.5

1.2

(77.1--81.9)

Wilmington, North Carolina

600

75.6

2.7

(70.4--80.8)

Winston--Salem, North Carolina

524

68.4

2.8

(62.9--73.9)

Worcester, Massachusetts

2,504

80.4

1.3

(77.8--83.0)

Yakima, Washington

755

61.8

2.5

(56.9--66.7)

Youngstown--Warren--Boardman, Ohio--Pennsylvania

1,000

68.2

2.8

(62.7--73.7)

Yuma, Arizona

564

68.9

2.6

(63.9--73.9)

Median

67.4

Range

50.9--85.0

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Metropolitan division.


TABLE 12. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months, by county --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2008

County

Sample size

%

SE*

95% CI

Jefferson County, Alabama

599

78.8

2.6

(73.7--83.9)

Mobile County, Alabama

580

70.7

3.1

(64.5--76.9)

Montgomery County, Alabama

346

76.4

4.1

(68.3--84.5)

Tuscaloosa County, Alabama

441

71.6

3.6

(64.4--78.8)

Anchorage Municipality, Alaska

399

61.8

3.0

(55.9--67.7)

Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska

498

63.5

2.6

(58.4--68.6)

Cochise County, Arizona

518

67.4

3.0

(61.5--73.3)

Maricopa County, Arizona

957

67.3

2.2

(63.1--71.5)

Pima County, Arizona

803

68.8

2.5

(64.0--73.6)

Pinal County, Arizona

515

66.2

3.7

(58.9--73.5)

Yuma County, Arizona

564

68.9

2.6

(63.9--73.9)

Benton County, Arkansas

486

57.5

3.5

(50.7--64.3)

Pulaski County, Arkansas

816

68.0

2.5

(63.2--72.8)

Washington County, Arkansas

380

58.1

4.1

(50.2--66.0)

Alameda County, California

515

65.4

2.9

(59.8--71.0)

Contra Costa County, California

418

59.1

3.1

(53.0--65.2)

Los Angeles County, California

1,511

68.6

1.6

(65.5--71.7)

Orange County, California

964

67.0

2.0

(63.1--70.9)

Riverside County, California

710

62.3

2.5

(57.3--67.3)

Sacramento County, California

558

67.5

2.7

(62.2--72.8)

San Bernardino County, California

642

64.8

2.5

(59.9--69.7)

San Diego County, California

1,134

64.4

1.9

(60.7--68.1)

San Francisco County, California

315

62.4

3.7

(55.2--69.6)

Santa Clara County, California

567

61.9

2.7

(56.7--67.1)

Adams County, Colorado

783

57.4

2.3

(52.8--62.0)

Arapahoe County, Colorado

1,207

66.2

1.9

(62.4--70.0)

Boulder County, Colorado

707

57.0

2.5

(52.0--62.0)

Denver County, Colorado

1,175

59.0

2.0

(55.1--62.9)

Douglas County, Colorado

623

65.9

2.3

(61.5--70.3)

El Paso County, Colorado

1,321

62.5

1.8

(58.9--66.1)

Jefferson County, Colorado

1,454

60.0

1.7

(56.7--63.3)

Larimer County, Colorado

741

57.7

2.6

(52.5--62.9)

Weld County, Colorado

507

58.7

2.9

(53.0--64.4)

Fairfield County, Connecticut

1,774

67.6

1.8

(64.0--71.2)

Hartford County, Connecticut

1,433

70.5

1.9

(66.9--74.1)

New Haven County, Connecticut