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MMWR Early Release

May 1, 2015 / Vol. 64 / Early Release
Possible Sexual Transmission of Ebola Virus — Liberia, 2015
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 This Week in MMWR


Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that causes plague, shown under low-power magnification of a digital Keyence scope.

Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that causes plague, shown under low-power magnification of a digital Keyence scope.

 


May 1, 2015 / Vol. 64 / No. 16
CE Available

Outbreak of Human Pneumonic Plague with Dog-to-Human and Possible Human-to-Human Transmission — Colorado, June–July 2014

On July 8, 2014, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment identified Yersinia pestis in a blood specimen collected from a man (patient A) hospitalized with pneumonia. Patient A’s dog had died recently with hemoptysis. Three other persons who had contact with the dog, one of whom also had contact with patient A, were ill with fever and respiratory symptoms, including two with radiographic evidence of pneumonia. Specimens from the dog and all three human contacts yielded evidence of acute Y. pestis infection.



MMWR Recommendations and Reports

February 20, 2015 / Vol. 64 / No. RR–2
CE Available
Clinical Guidance for Smallpox Vaccine Use in a Postevent Vaccination Program

This report outlines recommendations for the clinical use of the three smallpox vaccines stored in the U.S. Strategic National Stockpile for persons who are exposed to smallpox virus or at high risk for smallpox infection during a postevent vaccination program following an intentional or accidental release of the virus. These recommendations will be updated as new data on smallpox vaccines become available and as further clinical guidance for other medical countermeasures including antivirals is developed.

MMWR Surveillance Summaries

May 1, 2015 / Vol. 64 / No. SS–3
Cryptosporidiosis Surveillance — United States, 2011–2012

Cryptosporidiosis is a nationally notifiable gastrointestinal illness caused by the extremely chlorine-tolerant protozoa of the genus Cryptosporidium. Fifty state and two metropolitan public health agencies voluntarily report cases of cryptosporidiosis through CDC’s National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System. For 2011, a total of 9,313 cryptosporidiosis cases (confirmed and nonconfirmed) were reported; for 2012, a total of 8,008 cases were reported; 5.8% and 5.3%, respectively, were associated with a detected outbreak. Cryptosporidiosis incidence rates remain elevated nationally, and rates of nonconfirmed cases have increased. Rates remain highest in young children, although rates among elderly adults are increasing. Future research is needed to address shifting trends in cryptosporidiosis cases, with a specific focus on the increase in nonconfirmed cases and increasing incidence rates among elderly adults.



Giardiasis Surveillance — United States, 2011–2012

Giardiasis is a nationally notifiable gastrointestinal illness caused by the protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis. Forty-four states, the District of Columbia, New York City, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and Guam voluntarily reported cases of giardiasis to CDC through the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS). For 2011, a total of 16,868 giardiasis cases (98.8% confirmed and 1.2% nonconfirmed) were reported; for 2012, a total of 15,223 cases (98.8% confirmed and 1.3% nonconfirmed) were reported. In 2011 and 2012, 1.5% and 1.3% of cases, respectively, were associated with a detected outbreak. For the first time in 10 years, giardiasis rates appear to be decreasing. Educational efforts to decrease exposure to unsafe drinking and recreational water and prevent person-to-person transmission have the potential to reduce giardiasis transmission.

MMWR Summary of Notifiable Diseases

September 19, 2014 / Vol. 61 / No. 53
Summary of Notifiable Diseases — United States, 2012

Health-care providers in the United States are required to report certain infectious diseases to a specified state or local authority. A disease is designated as notifiable if timely information about individual cases is considered necessary for prevention and control of the disease. Each year, CDC publishes a summary of the cases of notifiable disease reported for the most recent year for which data is available. This report presents a summary of notifiable diseases for 2012.

MMWR Supplements

October 31, 2014 / Vol. 63 / Supplement / No. 4
CDC National Health Report: Leading Causes of Morbidity and Mortality and Associated Behavioral Risk and Protective Factors—United States, 2005–2013

This MMWR Supplement presents data related to disease patterns across the United States and describes recent national trends in health status. Although the United States has made overall progress in improving public health and increasing life expectancy, progress has been slow, and in some aspects of health, change has not occurred or trends are not favorable.


 


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