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MMWR Editorial Board

Timothy F. Jones, MD
Matthew L. Boulton, MD, MPH
Virginia A. Caine, MD
Katherine Lyon Daniel, PhD
Jonathan E. Fielding, MD, MPH, MBA
David W. Fleming, MD
William E. Halperin, MD, DrPH, MPH
King K. Holmes, MD, PhD
Robin Ikeda, MD, MPH, (RADM, USPHS)
Rima F. Khabbaz, MD
Phyllis Meadows, PhD, MSN, RN
Jewel Mullen, MD, MPH, MPA
Jeff Niederdeppe, PhD
Patricia Quinlisk, MD, MPH
Patrick L. Remington, MD, MPH
Carlos Roig, MS, MA
William L. Roper, MD, MPH
William Schaffner, MD

 

Timothy F. Jones, MD  (Chairman)
Nashville, TN

Dr. Timothy Jones earned a medical doctorate degree from Stanford University and completed a residency in Family Medicine and a Maternal/Child Health Fellowship at the Brown University/Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island program. He practiced in an underserved population in Utah before joining CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service in 1997. He now serves as the State Epidemiologist for the Tennessee Department of Health, overseeing programs including Immunizations, TB, HIV/STD, Emergency Preparedness, Foodborne Diseases, Healthcare Associated Infections, Vectorborne and Zoonotic Diseases, Environmental Epidemiology, Prescription Drug Overdose Epidemiology, and general communicable disease surveillance and control. He serves on CDC’s Board of Scientific Counselors and is active on the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE), including serving as President (2013−2014). Dr. Jones has authored over 120 peer-reviewed publications on a variety of public health topics.

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Matthew L. Boulton, MD, MPH  
Ann Arbor, MI

Dr. Matthew L. Boulton is a Professor of Epidemiology, Preventive Medicine and Health Management & Policy in the School of Public Health and Professor of Internal Medicine, Infectious Disease Division in the University Health System at the University of Michigan. He is serving as the first Senior Associate Dean for Global Public Health at the School of Public Health and as Director of the Office of Global Public Health. He is also the Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine and Director, Center of Excellence in Public Health Workforce Studies. He is the former, and first, Associate Dean for Practice and founded the school’s Office of Public Health Practice. Before coming to the University of Michigan, he worked for many years in public health practice, first as a local health department Medical Director for four different health departments and later as the governor’s Chief Medical Executive and State Epidemiologist, serving as the lead physician/epidemiologist at the state health department.

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Virginia A. Caine, MD
Indianapolis, IN

Dr. Virginia A. Caine is Director of the Marion County Public Health Department and Associate Professor of Medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine Infectious Disease Division.

Dr. Caine established the first HIV/AIDS integrated health care delivery system involving major hospitals, community health centers, social service agencies, and HIV dental clinics in Indianapolis, Indiana.

She has served as a member of the American Public Health Association, as Past President; the National Academy of Science Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Prevention and Control of STDs; and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Coordinating Committee on Clinical Preventive Services.

Dr. Caine is active in the National Medical Association; the National Association of County and City Health Officials; the Fairbanks Institute Board of Directors; the CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV, Viral Hepatitis, and STD Prevention and Treatment; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) National Preparedness and Response Science Board; and the Indiana Health Information Exchange.

She has served as a board member for the DHHS Steering Committee for the Bright Futures for Women’s Health and Wellness Initiative, CDC’s Elimination of Health Disparities through Translation Research Panel, the Council on Education for the Public Health Board, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s National Advisory Committee for Common Ground: Transforming Public Health Information Systems.

She earned her bachelor’s degree from Gustavus Adolphus College in Minnesota and her medical degree at New York Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse. She received her infectious disease training at the University of Washington in Seattle.

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Katherine Lyon Daniel, PhD
Atlanta, GA

Dr. Katherine Lyon Daniel is CDC’s Associate Director for Communication. She leads the agency’s external and internal communication aimed at putting the best information available into the hands of people who need it to protect their health or the health of others. Dr. Daniel combines her experience in strategic communication and behavioral science to advance CDC’s mission of saving lives and protecting people. Dr. Daniel earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Virginia, and her Ph.D. in social ecology from the University of California at Irvine. Her dissertation research focused on communicating long-term health risks to the U.S. Senate. During 2010–2011, she completed the National Preparedness Leadership Initiative at Harvard University. Dr. Daniel has conducted and published research on risk perception and understanding risk behavior. She has received numerous professional communication awards, including two HHS Secretary’s Awards for Distinguished Service, the International Academy of Arts and Sciences Questar Grand award, the MarCom Creative Gold award, and the Public Relations Society of America’s prestigious Silver Anvil award.

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Jonathan E. Fielding, MD, MPH, MBA
Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Jonathan Fielding has contributed to the fields of public health and prevention for 45 years in multiple leadership positions. He is a Distinguished Professor of Health Policy and Management at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and has been a Professor of Pediatrics at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA since 1979.

Dr. Fielding served as the Los Angeles County Director of Public Health and Health Officer for 16 years. In this role, he was responsible for all public health functions including surveillance and control of both communicable and non-communicable diseases, and health protection (including against bioterrorism) for the County’s 9.8 million residents.  His prior experience includes serving as Commissioner of Public Health for Massachusetts.

He is a founding member and chair of the U.S. Community Preventive Services Task Force and was a founding member of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.  He is a Presidential appointee to the national Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health. He also serves on CDC’s Advisory Committee to the Director. Formerly he chaired the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary’s expert advisory group on the national 2020 Healthy People Project. Dr. Fielding is an elected member of the Academy of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Fielding has authored more than 300 articles, commentaries and editorials on public health and prevention issues and is the Editor of the Annual Review of Public Health. He received his medical, public health and history of science degrees from Harvard University and an MBA in finance from the Wharton School of Business.

 

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David W. Fleming, MD
Seattle, WA

Dr. David W. Fleming is PATH’s vice president of Public Health Impact, which encompasses programs in reproductive health, maternal and child health and nutrition, noncommunicable diseases, malaria control and elimination, and HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis. He also oversees cross-programmatic collaboration at PATH, which seeks to maximize the impact of work critical health areas, including maternal and neonatal health, diarrheal disease, and malaria.

Before joining PATH in 2014, Dr. Fleming served as the director and health officer for Public Health—Seattle and King County (PHSKC), with a budget of more than $300 million, serving a resident population of 2 million. Prior to that, Dr. Fleming was director of Global Health Strategies at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, overseeing a grant portfolio of more than $1 billion in vaccine-preventable disease, nutrition, maternal and child health, leadership, emergency relief, community health programs, and human resources and health information. Dr. Fleming also served as deputy director at CDC for Science and Public Health and as deputy administrator of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.

Dr. Fleming is a clinical associate professor at the University of Washington School of Public Health. He completed his internal medicine residency at the University of Oregon Health Services Center and his preventive medicine residency at CDC.

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William E. Halperin, MD, DrPH, MPH
Newark, NJ

Dr. William Halperin is a professor in the Department of Epidemiology of the Rutgers School of Public Health and formerly chair of the Department of Preventive Medicine in the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School and Associate Dean for the Newark Campus of the School of Public Health. His current focus is on teaching epidemiology and supervising MD-MPH students.  He was formerly with CDC, where he held numerous positions, including Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer, Preventive Medicine Resident, and Deputy Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Dr. Halperin has an extensive background in occupational and environmental health particularly in field epidemiology, surveillance, and large scale cohort studies.  He received his medical doctorate from Harvard Medical School and earned a master’s degree and a doctorate in public health from the Harvard School of Public Health. He is certified by the American Board of Preventive Medicine and the American Board of Occupational Medicine. Dr. Halperin is a past member and chair of the Committee on Toxicology of the National Research Council and is currently on the NRC’s Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology.

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King Holmes, MD, PhD
Seattle, WA

Dr.  King Holmes received his medical degree from Cornell University in 1963 and a doctorate in microbiology from the University of Hawaii in 1967. He completed internal medicine training at the University of Washington in 1969.  His research on sexually transmitted infections began during a U.S. Navy assignment during the Vietnam War.  His subsequent research with over 150 trainees and mentees has identified etiologies of several STI syndromes and led to new diagnostics, therapies, and preventive interventions for several STIs. His trainees have helped populate academia with leaders in STI/HIV research and training. 

As a faculty member at UW, Dr. Holmes joined and served in the USPHS from 1969 to 1986, including assignment to CDC’s Division of STD Prevention from 1983 to 1986. At Harborview Medical Center, he founded the STD Clinic, co-founded the HIV/AIDS Clinic, and became Chief of Medicine (1984–1989) and then Section Head for Infectious Diseases (1996–2014). He founded and still directs the UW Center for AIDS and STD (a WHO/PAHO Collaborating Center) and the UW/FHCRC Center for AIDS Research, and is PI for the UW/UCSF International Training and Education Center for Health (I-TECH). In 2006, with support from the Gates Foundation and Washington State, the UW launched the Department of Global Health, based jointly in the Schools of Medicine and Public Health. Dr. Holmes served as William H. Foege Chair from 2006 to 2014.

Dr. Holmes is a member of the Institute of Medicine, and Fellow of the American Association for Advancement of Science, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and the American Society of Microbiology. In 2013, he received the Canada Gairdner Foundation Global Health Award, and the IDSA Alexander Fleming Lifetime Achievement Award.

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Robin Ikeda, MD, MPH (RADM, USPHS)
Atlanta, GA

Dr. Robin Ikeda is the Deputy Director for CDC’s Office of Noncommunicable Diseases, Injury and Environmental Health (ONDIEH). In this position, she is responsible for providing guidance and leadership to the CDC′s scientific and programmatic portfolios. Previously, she served as Acting Director for the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) from January to November 2010, while also serving as Deputy Director. Prior to these appointments, from April 2006 to September 2009, Dr. Ikeda served as NCIPC′s Associate Director for Science. From 2003 to 2006, she held the position as Associate Director for Science within CDC′s Epidemiology Program Office and the Office of Workforce and Career Development. During 1993–2006, she held a range of positions within NCIPC, including team leader and staff epidemiologist, and worked on a number of injury prevention issues including youth violence, suicide, and motor-vehicle related crashes. She began her career at CDC as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer assigned to the Bureau of Communicable Disease Control at the New York State Department of Health. Dr. Ikeda earned a BA degree from Stanford University, an MD from Cornell University Medical College, and an MPH degree in epidemiology from the Emory University Rollins School of Public Health. She is board certified in both internal medicine and preventive medicine and holds the rank of Rear Admiral in the United States Public Health Service.

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Rima F. Khabbaz, MD
Atlanta, GA

Dr. Rima Khabbaz is the CDC Deputy Director for Infectious Diseases and Director of the Office of Infectious Diseases.  In these positions, she provides leadership to the efforts of CDC’s infectious disease national centers and helps to advance the Agency’s cross-cutting infectious disease priorities.  Earlier CDC leadership positions at CDC include director of the National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases, and director, acting deputy director, and associate director for epidemiologic science in the National Center for Infectious Diseases.  She joined CDC in 1980 as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer assigned to the Hospital Infections Program.  During her CDC career, she has made major contributions to advance infectious disease control, including playing key roles in CDC’s responses to outbreaks of new and/or reemerging infections.  A graduate of the American University of Beirut, Lebanon, Dr. Khabbaz trained in internal medicine and completed a fellowship in infectious diseases at the University of Maryland, Baltimore.  She is a fellow of IDSA and member of the American Epidemiologic Society, ASM, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, and the American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.  In addition to her CDC position, she serves as adjunct professor of medicine (infectious diseases) at Emory University.  She is a graduate of the National Preparedness Leadership Initiative at Harvard University and of the Public Health Leadership Institute at the University of North Carolina.

 

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Phyllis Meadows, PhD, MSN, RN
Ann Arbor, MI

Dr. Phyllis Meadows is a Senior Fellow in the Health Program at the Kresge Foundation. She engages in all levels of grant-making activity. Since joining the Kresge Foundation in 2009, she has advised the Health team on the development of its overall strategic direction and provided leadership in the design and implementation of grant-making initiatives and projects. Dr. Meadows also has coached team members and created linkages to national organizations and experts in the health field. In addition, she regularly reviews grant proposals, aids prospective grantees in preparing funding requests, and provides health-related expertise. She also shares a portion of her time as Associate Dean for Practice at the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health and is a Clinical Professor in the department of Health Management and Policy, where she teaches courses in applied public health leadership and policy. Dr. Meadows’ 30-year career spans the nursing, public health, academic, and philanthropic sectors. During 2004–2009, she served as Deputy Director and as Director, and Public Health Officer at the Detroit Department of Health and Wellness Promotion. In the early 1990s, she traveled abroad as a Kellogg International Leadership Fellow and joined the W.K. Kellogg Foundation as a program director focusing on education, higher education, health and technology. Dr. Meadows’ professional experience includes leadership roles in public health, community health, nursing and philanthropy. She recently served on the IOM Roundtable on Population Health Improvement: Strategies to advance the Public’s Health, and is currently a member of roundtables on the Elimination of Health Inequities, and Population Health Improvement.

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Jewel Mullen, MD, MPH, MPA
Hartford, CT

Dr. Jewel Mullen is President of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials and Commissioner, Connecticut Department of Public Health. Prior to joining the department in 2010, she was Director of the Bureau of Community Health and Prevention at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, leading the department’s divisions of Prevention and Wellness, Violence and Injury Prevention, and Primary Care and Health Access, and an Office of Statistics and Evaluation. With a professional focus on the intersection of public health and primary care, Dr. Mullen began her clinical career as a member of the National Health Service Corps at Bellevue Hospital in New York. She also is the former medical director of Baystate Mason Square Neighborhood Health Center in Springfield, Massachusetts. As a clinician educator, she has served on the medical school faculty at New York University, The University of Virginia, Yale and Tufts. She is a member of the Advisory Committee to the Director of the CDC and chairs the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Federal Advisory Committee. Board certified in internal medicine, Dr. Mullen received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Public Health from Yale University, where she also completed a postdoctoral fellowship in psychosocial epidemiology. A graduate of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, she completed her residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. She also earned a master’s degree in public administration from Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government.

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Jeff Niederdeppe, PhD
Ithaca, NY

Dr. Jeff Niederdeppe is an associate professor in the Department of Communication at Cornell University. His research examines the mechanisms and effects of mass media campaigns, strategic health messages, and news coverage in shaping health behavior, health disparities, and social policy. He has published more than 90 peer-reviewed articles in communication, public health, health policy, and medical journals, and his work has been funded in recent years by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. He is an Associate Editor for Communication Methods and Measures and serves on the editorial board for four other communication journals. Dr. Niederdeppe was awarded the Lewis Donohew Outstanding Scholar in Health Communication Award from the Kentucky Conference on Health Communication in 2014. Prior to joining Cornell’s faculty in 2008, he received his Ph.D. in 2006 from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania and was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health and Society Scholar at the University of Wisconsin from 2006 to 2008.

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Patricia Quinlisk, MD, MPH
Des Moines, IA

Dr. Patricia Quinlisk is the Medical Director and State Epidemiologist at the Iowa Department of Public Health. She earned a master’s degree in public health from the Johns Hopkins University and a medical doctorate degree from the University of Wisconsin. Her background includes training as a clinical microbiologist, training microbiologists while a Peace Corps volunteer in Nepal, and training as a field epidemiologist in the CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service. For 12 years she conducted epidemiologic training courses in Europe and is a professor at the University of Iowa, the University of Wisconsin, Des Moines University, and Iowa State University. She has served on CDC’s Board of Scientific Counselors, on the National Vaccine Advisory Committee, and as President of the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE). She was on the Institute of Medicine’s committees on Microbial Threats to Health in the 21st Century, Animal Health at the Crossroads, Preparing for the Psychological Consequences of Terrorism, and Antivirals for Pandemic Influenza. In 2009 she received an honorary Doctorate of Science degree from Iowa State University, and for five years she served as chair for the National Biodefense Science Board.

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Patrick L. Remington, MD, MPH
Madison, WI

Dr. Patrick L. Remington is Associate Dean for Public Health and Professor of Population Health Sciences at the School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW). He began his public health career in 1982 at CDC, serving as an Epidemic Intelligence Services (EIS) Officer with the Michigan Health Department and as a medical epidemiologist with the Division of Nutrition in Atlanta. In 1988, he returned to Madison to work as an epidemiologist in the Wisconsin Division of Health, eventually serving as the first Chief Medical Officer for Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention. Since joining UW in 1997, he has served as Associate Director of the Carbone Cancer Center and was the founding director of the Population Health Institute and the Master of Public Health Program. Dr. Remington earned a Bachelor of Science degree in molecular biology and a medical doctorate degree from UW, completed an Internal Medicine Internship at the Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle, was an EIS officer and completed a Preventive Medicine Residency at CDC, and received an MPH degree from the University of Minnesota. His research focuses on developing methods to measure the health of communities and communicate this information to the public and policy makers. He was the founder of the RWJ-funded “County Health Rankings” project, which ranks the health of the counties in all 50 states and examines strategies to improve population health. He has authored or co-authored over 300 publications and teaches courses on public health practice to undergraduate, medical, and public health students.

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Carlos Roig, MS, MA
Washington, DC

Mr. Carlos Roig is Executive Vice President at Subject Matter, a District of Columbia–based communications and public affairs agency. He leads strategic initiatives for the firm and its clients and has been instrumental in shaping Subject Matter’s offerings over the past six years. Mr. Roig built the firm’s first Digital Strategy unit and directed the Content and Media divisions before moving into his current companywide role. He is a frequent public speaker on the intersection of journalism, advertising and strategic communications. Prior to joining Subject Matter, he led the site-wide development of new online communities for USA Today and directed the news organization's full digital coverage of the 2008 presidential campaign, election and inauguration. In addition to his work in media and communications, he is a recipient of the Teaching Excellence and Service Award for his instruction in Georgetown University’s graduate journalism program. He has received academic and reporting fellowships from the Knight Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation, the McCormick Foundation and Columbia University. His investigative reporting on data mining and terrorism prosecutions has been featured in The Washington Post, and he has contributed to multi-platform projects with ABC News, the Associated Press, BBC, the Los Angeles Times, and Wired magazine. Mr. Roig received a Master of Science degree in journalism from Northwestern University; a Master of Arts degree in Spanish (with an emphasis in Hispanic literature) from New York University; and a Bachelor of Arts degree with High Honors in anthropology from the University of California at Berkeley.

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William L. Roper, MD, MPH
Chapel Hill, NC

Dr. William L. Roper is CEO of the UNC Health Care System and dean of the School of Medicine and vice chancellor for medical affairs at the University of North Carolina (UNC). He also is professor of health policy and administration in the School of Public Health, and is professor of pediatrics and of social medicine in the School of Medicine at UNC. From 1997 until 2004, he was dean of the School of Public Health at UNC.

Before joining UNC in 1997, Dr. Roper was senior vice president of Prudential HealthCare. He joined Prudential in 1993 as president of the Prudential Center for Health Care Research. Before coming to Prudential, Dr. Roper was director of CDC, served on the senior White House staff, and was administrator of the Health Care Financing Administration (responsible for Medicare and Medicaid). Earlier, he was a White House Fellow.

He received a medical doctorate from the University of Alabama School of Medicine and a master’s degree in public health from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health. He completed a residency in pediatrics at the University of Colorado Medical Center.

Dr. Roper is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. He is a member of the board of directors of DaVita, Inc., and a member of the board of directors of Express Scripts Holding Company.

He lives with his wife Dr. Maryann Roper, a pediatric oncologist, and their son, Will, in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

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William Schaffner, MD
Nashville, TN

Dr. William Schaffner is Professor of Preventive Medicine in the Department of Health Policy and Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee.

After graduating from Yale University in 1957, Dr. Schaffner attended the University of Freiburg, Germany, as a Fulbright Scholar. He attended Cornell University Medical College and completed residency training and a Fellowship in Infectious Diseases at Vanderbilt. He then joined the U.S. Public Health Service as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer with CDC in Atlanta for two years. While with CDC, Dr. Schaffner became familiar with public health and investigated outbreaks of communicable diseases both in the United States and abroad. He returned to Vanderbilt and established a collaboration with the Tennessee Department of Health. Dr. Schaffner’s primary interest is the prevention of infectious diseases. He is a strong proponent of collaboration between academic medical centers and public health institutions. He has worked extensively on the effective use of vaccines and has been a member of numerous expert advisory committees that establish national vaccine policy.

Dr. Schaffner is the Medical Director of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases and has served on the Board of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Dr. Schaffner often is invited to comment in local and national media on communicable disease issues, translating research advances and public health events into language that the public can understand.


 

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