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Help Your Child Gain Control Over Asthma

Help Your Child Gain Control Over Asthma - Brochure Cover

Here is an easy-to-read guide for parents of children with asthma. The guide provides parents and caregivers the information they need to improve their children's quality of life.

Asthma is a disease that affects the lungs. It is one of the most common long-term diseases of children. Asthma causes repeated episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and nighttime or early morning coughing. If your child has asthma, he or she has it all the time, but he or she will have asthma attacks only when something bothers his or her lungs.

In most cases, we don't know what causes asthma, and we don't know how to cure it.

Asthma can be controlled by knowing the warning signs of an attack, staying away from things that trigger an attack, and following the advice of a doctor or other medical professional.

An asthma attack can occur when someone with asthma is exposed to things in the environment, such as house dust mites and tobacco smoke. These are called asthma triggers.

Resources for Parents


Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

CDC's National Asthma Control Program created this set of videos to help children with asthma and their families and caregivers learn how to use an asthma inhaler. The kids in these videos have asthma. Watch them demonstrate the techniques they use to take their medicine. This helps them control their asthma.

Allergy and Asthma Network, Mothers of Asthmatics

This site offers you information about living with allergies and asthma.

American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology

If you think your child might have asthma, the first step is talking to a doctor. This site offers more information about childhood asthma: http://www.aaaai.org/conditions-and-treatments/library/at-a-glance/childhood-asthma.aspx.

American Lung Association

This site offers you information about asthma and children.

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

This checklist, How Asthma-Friendly Is Your Child-Care Setting?, can help you identify a healthy childcare setting for your child with asthma. It is available in English and Spanish.

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency informs people about the environment and develops and enforces regulations to protect the environment. Its mission is to protect human health and the environment. Here you will find helpful information about how you can control asthma triggers at home.

  • Attack Asthma. Learn More.

    Did you know that things in the bath, blankets, or stuffed animals can trigger an asthma attack? Find out how to reduce common asthma triggers in your home. Go to the section For Kids to download a fun booklet with games that can help your child learn about asthma.

To help your child learn about asthma, please visit, Kids.

 

Data & Surveillance

Percents by Age, Sex, and Race, United States, 2012. Age: Child = 9.3%, Adult =  8.0%, Sex: Male = 7.0%, Female =  9.5%, Race/Ethnicity: White =  8.1%, Black =  11.9%, Hispanic =  7%. Source: National Health Interview Survey, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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  • Page last reviewed: April 24, 2009
  • Page last updated: April 30, 2013
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