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Potential Range in US

Estimated range of Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti in the United States, 2016*

	Two maps of the United States showing Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes are or have been previously found.  Aedes aegypti range is the southern half of the United States.  Aedes albopictus range is the eastern half of the United States as well as the southwest.

*Maps have been updated from a variety of sources. These maps represent CDC's best estimate of the potential range of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus in the United States. Maps are not meant to represent risk for spread of disease.

Estimated range of Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti in the United States, 2016 Maps [PDF - 1 page]

Estimated range of Aedes aegypti and Aedes Albopictus on US Tribal lands, 2016 Maps [PDF - 2 pages]

The new estimated range maps have been updated from a variety of published and unpublished sources. These maps show CDC’s best estimate of the potential range of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus in the United States. These maps include areas where mosquitoes are or have been previously found. Maps are not meant to represent risk for spread of disease. Aedes aegyptimosquitoes are more likely to spread viruses like Zika, dengue, chikungunya and other viruses than other types of mosquitoes such as Aedes albopictus mosquitoes

These maps show

  • The new estimated range maps have been updated from a variety of published and unpublished sources.
  • These maps show CDC’s best estimate of the potential range of Aedes aegypti andAedes albopictus in the United States.
  • These maps include areas where mosquitoes are or have been previously found.
  • Maps are not meant to represent risk for spread of disease.

These maps DO NOT show

  • Likelihood that these mosquitoes will spread viruses. Shaded areas on the map do not necessarily mean that there are infected mosquitoes in that area.
  • Numbers of mosquitoes: These maps do not show how many mosquitoes are living in an area. Mosquito population numbers vary widely across the shaded areas on the map, from high numbers of mosquitoes in some parts of Florida and Texas to rare reports of mosquitoes further north.
  • Exact locations of mosquitoes: These maps are our best estimate of where mosquitoes could potentially live. Actual mosquito populations will vary by state and county. Mosquito populations may be found in an area that is not shaded on the maps and may not be found in all shaded areas.

About these mosquitoes

Aedes aegypti

  • 	a female Aedes aegypti mosquito while in the process of acquiring a blood meal from her human host.
  • These mosquitoes live in tropical, subtropical, and in some temperate climates.
  • They are the main type of mosquito that spread Zika, dengue, chikungunya, and other viruses.
  • Because Aedes aegypti mosquitoes live near and prefer to feed on people, they are more likely to spread these viruses than other types of mosquitoes.

Aedes albopictus

  • 	A female Aedes albopictus mosquito feeding on a human host
  • These mosquitoes live tropical, subtropical, and temperate climates, but can live in a broader temperature range and at cooler temperatures than Aedes aegypti.
  • Because these mosquitoes feed on animals as well as people, they are less likely to spread viruses like Zika, dengue, chikungunya and other viruses.

About outbreaks spread by mosquitoes

  • Local mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission has been reported in the continental United States.
  • Many areas in the United States have the type of mosquitoes that can become infected with and spread Zika, chikungunya, and dengue viruses.
  • Recent outbreaks in the continental United States of chikungunya and dengue, which are spread by the same type of mosquito, have been relatively small and limited to a small area.
  • Areas with past outbreaks of chikungunya and dengue are considered at higher risk for Zika. These include U.S. territories like Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Guam. Local outbreaks have also been reported in parts of Hawaii, Florida, and Texas.
  • Aedes aegypti or Aedes albopictus mosquitoes can cause an outbreak, if all of the following happens:
    • People get infected with a virus (like Zika, dengue, or chikungunya).
    • An Aedes aegypti or Aedes albopictus mosquito bites an infected person during the first week of infection when the virus can be found in the person’s blood.
    • The infected mosquito lives long enough for the virus to multiply and for the mosquito to bite another person.
    • The cycle continues multiple times to start an outbreak.

Protect yourself from Zika and other viruses spread by mosquitoes

  • The best way to prevent Zika and other viruses spread through mosquito bites is to take steps to prevent mosquito bites [PDF - 2 pages]. If you are pregnant, strictly follow these steps:
    • Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
    • Stay in places with air conditioning and use window and door screens to keep mosquitoes outside.
    • Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellents with one of the following active ingredients: DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus, or para-menthane-diol. When used as directed, EPA-registered insect repellents are proven safe and effective, even for pregnant and breastfeeding women.
    • Treat clothing with permethrin or purchase permethrin-treated items.

For more information about how to prevent mosquito bites, see Mosquito Bite Prevention (United States) [PDF - 2 pages].

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