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Pregnant Women with Any Laboratory Evidence of Possible Zika Virus Infection, 2015-2018

US States and the District of Columbia

2,490

US Territories and Freely Associated States

4,917

As of November 20, 2018, there are 3 cases in the US States and the District of Columbia that no longer meet the Registry’s criteria and have been excluded since the last reporting date, October 16, 2018. A total of 3 additional cases in pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection in the US territories and freely associated states have been included since the last reporting date, October 16, 2018.

What these numbers show

These numbers reflect the number of pregnancies with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection that have been reported to the US Zika Pregnancy and Infant Registry. This includes Zika virus infections that were acquired via travel, sexual exposure, or local transmission, and pregnancies that were completed from December 1, 2015 to March 31, 2018.

Pregnancies with possible Zika virus infection that are ongoing after March 31, 2018, will not be included in these numbers. However, state, tribal, local, and territorial health departments may continue to securely send this medical information to the US Zika Pregnancy and Infant Registry.

There are some delays in reporting. The numbers may increase or decrease as new cases are added, or information on existing cases is clarified such as an ongoing pregnancy becoming a completed pregnancy.

What these numbers do not show

These numbers reflect the number of pregnant women with any laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection reported to the US Zika Pregnancy and Infant Registry. The numbers are reported by jurisdictions monthly and are not updated on the website in real time or as the cases are reported.

These numbers do not necessarily indicate recent transmission of Zika virus. The numbers are based on positive laboratory tests. Some of these laboratory tests can produce a positive result weeks after Zika virus infection has occurred. For more information about these laboratory tests see the laboratory website.

Where do these numbers come from?

These numbers reflect pregnant women reported to the US Zika Pregnancy and Infant Registry. CDC, in collaboration with state, tribal, local, and territorial health departments, established this Registry for comprehensive monitoring of pregnancy and infant outcomes with Zika virus infection.

The US Zika Pregnancy and Infant Registry is protected by an Assurance of Confidentiality. Under the Assurance CDC is not reporting individual state, tribal, local, territorial, or jurisdictional data to protect the privacy of the women and infants affected by Zika virus.

How are these numbers used?

This information will help healthcare providers as they counsel pregnant women with Zika virus infection. It is essential for planning at the federal, state, and local levels for clinical, public health, and other services needed to support pregnant women and families affected by Zika virus. The data collected through this Registry will be used to update recommendations for clinical care and to improve prevention of Zika virus infection during pregnancy.

What are the outcomes for these pregnancies?

Visit CDC’s pregnancy outcomes webpage for updated counts of pregnancy outcomes with birth defects related to Zika virus infection. These pregnant women monitored by the Registry have completed their pregnancies by March 31st, 2018. However, there may be delays in reporting outcomes from each pregnancy.

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