Request for the Technical Review of 10 Draft Skin Notation Assignments and Skin Notation Profile Documents

March 2019
NIOSH Docket Number 153-E, CDC-2019-0015

In 2009, NIOSH published Current Intelligence Bulletin (CIB) 61 – A Strategy for Assigning New NIOSH Skin Notations [NIOSH 2009-147]. The CIB presents a strategic framework that is a form of hazard identification designed to do the following:

  • Ensure that the assigned skin notations reflect the contemporary state of scientific knowledge
  • Provide transparency behind the assignment process
  • Communicate the hazards of chemical exposures of the skin
  • Meet the needs of health professionals, employers, and other interested parties in protecting workers from chemical contact with the skin.

This strategy involves the assignment of multiple skin notations for distinguishing systemic (SYS), direct (DIR), and sensitizing (SEN) effects caused by exposure of skin (SK) to chemicals. Chemicals that are highly or extremely toxic and may be potentially lethal or life-threatening following exposures of the skin are designated with the systemic subnotation (FATAL). Potential irritants and corrosive chemicals are indicated by the direct effects subnotations (IRR) and (COR), respectively.

NIOSH conducted a public review of the following 10 draft skin notations and support technical documents, entitled Skin Notation Profiles:

  • Skin notation profile: beta-Chloroprene
  • Skin notation profile: Chlorodiphenyl (42% chlorine)
  • Skin notation profile: Chlorodiphenyl (54% chlorine)
  • Skin notation profile: Cyclohexanol
  • Skin notation profile: Cyclohexanone
  • Skin notation profile: Cyclonite
  • Skin notation profile: Diacetyl and 2,3-Pentanedione
  • Skin notation profile: Diethylenetriamine
  • Skin notation profile: Dioxane
  • Skin notation profile: 2,4-Toluene diisocyanate, 2,6-Toluene diisocyanate, and the mixture of 2,4- and 2,6- Toluene diisocyanate.

To view the notice and related materials, visit https://www.regulations.govexternal icon  and enter CDC-2019-0015 in the search field and click “Search.”

Page last reviewed: May 15, 2019