National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week

October 21-27, 2018

2015 Lead Week logo: Lead Free KIDS for a Healthy Future

Lead Free Kids for a Healthy Future

Today, childhood lead poisoning is considered the most preventable environmental disease among young children, yet approximately half a million U.S. children have blood lead levels above 5 micrograms per deciliter, the reference level at which Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends public health actions be initiated. A simple blood test can prevent permanent damage that will last a lifetime. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and CDC are committed to eliminating this burden to public health.

 

Lead Poisoning Prevention Week 2018 Partner Information Kit

Banner: National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week, October 21-27, 2018

The theme of this year’s National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week (NLPPW) is Lead Free Kids for a Healthy Future. The NLPPW Partner Information Kitpdf iconexternal icon aims to help individuals, organizations, and state and local governments to work together to reduce childhood exposure to lead.  Through NLPPW, campaign organizers can help spread the word to:

  1. Get the Facts: Find out about the hazards of lead.
  2. Get Your Home Tested: Find out how to minimize risks of lead exposure by hiring a certified professional to test older homes for lead.
  3. Get Your Child Tested: A simple blood test can detect lead. Consult your health care provider for advice on testing your children.

The Partner Information Kit provides state and local governments and organizations with key materials and resources that are available for distribution to a wide array of audiences. The digital Partner Information Kit Includes:

Sample Social Media Posts for 2018 National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week

You can actively participate with HUD, EPA, and CDC to spread the word about National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week by sharing messaging on social media using the hashtags #leadfreekids and #NLPPW2018 and tagging @HUDgov, @HUDHealthyHomes, @EPA, and/or @CDCgov to help mobilize individuals and communities to take action to reduce the risk of lead exposure in their environments.

This year HUD, EPA, and CDC will be posting social media messages corresponding to daily themes.

  • Monday, October 22nd, 2018: How Do You Know if There is Lead in Your Home?
  • Tuesday, October 23rd, 2018: Make Sure Children Have Safe Crawls
  • Wednesday, October 24th, 2018: Speak to a Health Care Provider about Blood Lead Tests for Children
  • Thursday, October 25th, 2018: Get Your Drinking Water Tested for Lead
  • Friday, October 26th, 2018: Learn about the National Lead Information Center

You can retweet or share messages sent from these social media accounts, use the sample social media posts provided below corresponding to the daily themes, or write your own!



Monday, October 22nd, 2018 – How Do You Know if There is Lead in Your Home?

Twitter:

Talk to your state or local health department about testing paint and dust in your home for lead. #NLPPW2018 #leadfreekids
https://www.epa.gov/lead/understanding-inspection-risk-assessment-and-abatementExternalexternal icon

Many homes built before 1978 contain lead paint. When lead paint gets old, it can start peeling. Find out more! #NLPPW2018 #leadfreekids
https://www.epa.gov/lead/protect-your-family-exposures-lead#sl-homeExternalexternal icon

Facebook:

Do you know if there is lead in your home? Talk to your state or local health department about testing paint and dust in your home for lead. #NLPPW2018 #leadfreekids
https://www.epa.gov/lead/understanding-inspection-risk-assessment-and-abatementExternalexternal icon

Did you know many homes built before 1978 contain lead paint on both interior and exterior walls? When lead paint gets old, it can start to peel or come off in pieces. #NLPPW2018 #leadfreekids
https://www.epa.gov/lead/protect-your-family-exposures-lead#sl-homeExternalexternal icon


Tuesday, October 23rd, 2018Make Sure Children Have Safe Crawls

 Twitter:

Be sure to move children’s outdoor play areas away from bare soil and the sides of your home. Wet-mop floors and surfaces indoors often. #NLPPW2018 #leadfreekids
https://www.epa.gov/lead/learn-about-lead#exposedExternalexternal icon

Take off shoes when entering the house to prevent bringing lead-contaminated soil in from outside. #NLPPW2018 #leadfreekids
https://www.epa.gov/lead/learn-about-lead#exposedExternalexternal icon

Facebook:

Did you know children’s hands and toys can pick up household dust or exterior soil contaminated by lead? Be sure to move children’s outdoor play areas away from bare soil and the sides of your home. Wet-mop floors and wet-wipe surfaces indoors often to reduce the risk of lead exposure! #NLPPW2018 #leadfreekids
https://www.epa.gov/lead/learn-about-lead#exposedExternalexternal icon

Lead exposure is dangerous during early childhood development, particularly for children who crawl! Make sure to take off your shoes when entering the house to prevent bringing lead-contaminated soil in from outside. #NLPPW2018 #leadfreekids
https://www.epa.gov/lead/learn-about-lead#exposedExternalexternal icon


 

Wednesday, October 24th, 2018Speak to a Health Care Provider about Blood Level Tests for Children

 Twitter:

Lead poisoning is preventable! A simple blood test can detect lead. Find out more from your state or local childhood lead poisoning prevention program! #NLPPW2018 #leadfreekids
https://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/programs/default.htm

There is NO known safe blood lead level. Act early and get your child tested! Blood lead tests are usually recommended for children at 12- and 24-months. Talk to your doctor or health care provider for more information. #NLPPW2018 #leadfreekids

Facebook:

Lead poisoning is preventable! A simple blood test can detect lead. Find out more from your state or local childhood lead poisoning prevention program! #NLPPW2018 #leadfreekids
https://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/programs/default.htm

There is NO known safe blood lead level. Act early and get your child tested! Blood lead tests are usually recommended for children at 12- and 24-months. Talk to your doctor or health care provider for more information. #NLPPW2018 #leadfreekids


 

Thursday, October 25th, 2018Get Your Drinking Water Tested for Lead

Twitter:

You cannot see, taste, or smell lead in drinking water, but you can learn basic information about sources of lead in drinking water and suggestions for reducing exposure! #NLPPW2018 #leadfreekids
https://www.epa.gov/ground-water-and-drinking-water/infographic-lead-drinking-waterExternalexternal icon

Contact your local water authority for information about testing and identifying lead contamination in your water! #NLPPW2018 #leadfreekids
https://www.epa.gov/ground-water-and-drinking-water/basic-information-about-lead-drinking-water#findoutExternalexternal icon

Facebook:

You cannot see, taste, or smell lead in drinking water, but you can learn basic information about sources of lead in drinking water and suggestions for reducing exposure! #NLPPW2018 #leadfreekids
https://www.epa.gov/ground-water-and-drinking-water/infographic-lead-drinking-waterExternalexternal icon

Contact your local water authority for information about testing and identifying lead contamination in your water! #NLPPW2018 #leadfreekids
https://www.epa.gov/ground-water-and-drinking-water/basic-information-about-lead-drinking-water#findoutExternalexternal icon


 

Friday, October 26th, 2018 – Learn from the National Lead Information Center

Twitter:

¿Hablas español? ¿Tienes preguntas sobre el plomo? Call the National Lead Information Center toll-free hotline, 1-800-424-LEAD [5323] #NLPPW2018 #leadfreekids

The National Lead Information Center (NLIC) provides information about lead, lead hazards and prevention to the general public and professionals. Call 1-800-424-LEAD [5323]. #NLPPW2018 #leadfreekids

Facebook:

¿Hablas español? ¿Tienes preguntas sobre el plomo? Call the National Lead Information Center toll-free hotline, 1-800-424-LEAD [5323] #NLPPW2018 #leadfreekids

The National Lead Information Center (NLIC) provides information about lead, lead hazards and prevention to the general public and professionals. Call 1-800-424-LEAD [5323]. #NLPPW2018 #leadfreekids

 

Downloadable/Customizable Materials

Posters – These may be customized to include an organization’s logo and information. PDF versions are available hereexternal icon.

 

Flyers – These may be customized to include an organization’s logo and information. PDF versions are available hereexternal icon.

 

Icons

 

Web Banners – The following materials can be added to your website and are available in English.

Additional Information

Buttons

Copy and paste the code to add these buttons and badges to your website, blog, or social networking profile. Let your website visitors know how to stop lead poisoning and where to get more information.

Prevent Lead Poisoning Button. (83 x 83)

Copy the code for this “Prevent Lead Poisoning Button.” (83 x 83):

Prevent Lead Poisoning. Get your home tested. Get your child tested. Get the facts! Click here…

Copy the code for this “Prevent Lead Poisoning Button.” (150 x 150):

Prevent Lead Poisoning. Get your home tested. Get your child tested. Get the facts! Click here…

Copy the code for this “Prevent Lead Poisoning Button.” (250 x 250):

More Resources

For additional information about preventing childhood lead poisoning, visit

For more information about this kit, contact LeadInfo@cdc.gov.


 

Solve the Outbreak App

 

Solve the Outbreak app screenshot CDC’s Solve the Outbreak app lets you step into the shoes of a Disease Detective! Play through a series of disease “outbreaks,” one of which is based on the international response to the to lead poisoning crisis in Nigeria. In “The Village of Gold,” players read through screens of clues to determine what might be causing the lead poisoning outbreak, how it started, and how it’s spreading. Players can also access webpages with lead poisoning prevention information and a link to learn about the real Nigerian lead poisoning crisis.

Learn more about the Solve the Outbreak app here!

 


 

Audio Podcasts

 

Is Your Child Safe from Lead Poisoning?
Dr. Mary Jean Brown, discusses the importance of testing children for lead poisoning, who should be tested, and what parents can do to prevent lead poisoning.

Renovate Right: Prevent Lead Poisoning in Children
Dr. Maria Doa, Director of the EPA National Program Chemicals Division, discusses EPA’s new rule for renovations, repairs, and painting activities.