Healthy People Objectives

Healthy Peopleexternal icon provides science-based, 10-year national objectives for improving the health of all Americans. For three decades, Healthy People has established benchmarks and monitored progress over time to:

  • Identify nationwide health improvement priorities.
  • Increase public awareness and understanding of the determinants of health, disease, and disability and the opportunities for progress.
  • Provide measurable objectives and goals that are applicable at the national, state, and local levels.
  • Engage multiple sectors to take actions to strengthen policies and improve practices that are driven by the best available evidence and knowledge.
  • Identify critical research, evaluation, and data collection needs.
  • Measure the impact of prevention activities.

Overall, the Healthy People 2020 objectives for blood lead levels have been exceeded:

  • EH-8.1 To reduce blood lead levels in children (in the 97.5 percentile, age 1–5 years); Baseline was 5.8 µg/dL and is  currently 3.5 µg/dL, representing a 40% reduction
  • EH-8.2 To reduce the mean blood lead levels in children (geometric mean, age 1–5 years); Baseline was 1.8 µg/dL and is currently 0.8 µg/dL, representing a 55% reduction

However, disparities in blood lead levels by race/ethnicity and poverty status still exist with non-hispanic black children and those living at less than 130% of federal poverty being at higher risk for lead exposure.

Overall, the Healthy People 2020 objectives for blood lead levels have been exceeded: EH-8.1 To reduce blood lead levels in children (in the 97.5 percentile, age 1–5 years); Baseline was 5.8 µg/dL and is currently 3.5 µg/dL, representing a 40% reduction. And EH-8.2 To reduce the mean blood lead levels in children (geometric mean, age 1–5 years); Baseline was 1.8 µg/dL and is currently 0.8 µg/dL, representing a 55% reduction. However, disparities in blood lead levels by race/ethnicity and poverty status still exist with non-hispanic black children and those living at less than 130% of federal poverty being at higher risk for lead exposure.

While we have made much progress as a nation, significant disparities in children’s blood lead levels still exist.  CDC is committed to help address this threat and improve health outcomes for our nation’s most vulnerable citizens – our children.