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Drug Use and HIV

Sharing needles, syringes, or other equipment (works) to inject drugs puts people at high risk for getting or transmitting HIV and other infections. People who inject drugs account for about 1 in 10 HIV diagnoses in the United States. The best way to reduce the risk of getting or transmitting HIV through injection drug use is to stop injecting drugs. Call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) to find a treatment center. If you continue injecting drugs, never share needles or works.

Injection Drug Use and HIV Risk

Injection Drug Use and HIV Risk

Learn how injection drug use can put people at risk for getting HIV and how to reduce the risk.

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Vital Signs: HIV and Injection Drug Use

Vital Signs

This issue of CDC’s Vital Signs presents data about HIV diagnoses and risk behaviors such as syringe sharing among people who inject drugs. It also describes how syringe services programs can help reduce HIV among people who inject drugs.

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HIV Among People Who Inject Drugs

HIV Among People Who Inject Drugs

See the latest data on HIV among people who inject drugs, and learn what CDC is doing to prevent HIV infections among this population.

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HIV and Substance Use in the United States

HIV and Substance Use in the United States

In addition to injection drug use, other kinds of substance misuse are closely associated with HIV. Learn more about how substance misuse is related to HIV.

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Syringe Service Programs

Syringe Services Programs

In many jurisdictions, people who inject drugs can get sterile needles and syringes through syringe services programs. Find out more about these programs and how federal funds can be used to support certain parts of SSPs in some communities.

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CDC Consultations on Determination of Need Requests

CDC Consultations on Determination of Need Requests

This page lists jurisdictions that have consulted CDC and demonstrated a need for using federal funds to support syringe services programs, with the exception that funds cannot be used to buy needles or syringes.

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