Road Map for Indian Country

Montage of native people

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of dementia, and with greater age comes increased risk. Between 2014-2060, the number of American Indian and Alaska Natives aged 65 and older living with memory loss is projected to grow over five times. Today, one of every five American Indian and Alaska Native adults aged 45 and older reported experiencing subjective cognitive decline—increased difficulty in thinking or remembering over the past year—which can be a precursor to dementia.

The Healthy Brain Initiative Road Map for Indian Country pdf icon[ PDF -10.3 MB ] is the first-ever public health guide focused on dementia in American Indian and Alaska Native communities. The Road Map is designed to support discussion about dementia and caregiving within tribal communities and to encourage a public health approach—as part of a larger holistic response.

Older adults living with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias increasingly depend on caregivers and community resources as they become less able to care for themselves. Currently, one in three American Indian and Alaska Natives are caregivers.

The Road Map includes public health strategies to:

  • Enhance wellness for older adults affected by dementia
  • Support family caregivers
  • Promote brain health across generations

The Road Map for Indian Country highlights examples of Native leaders and community partners leveraging local strengths and resources within their tribal communities to address dementias in Indian Country.

Four additional Road Map-related documents for Indian Country are available:

Road Map for Indian Country cover

Healthy Brain Initiative: Road Map for Indian Country
[PDF - 10 MB]

Executive Summary for the Indian Country Road Map cover

Executive Summary for the Indian Country Road Map
[PDF - 415KB]