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MMWR: Ten Great Public Health Achievements — Worldwide, 2001–2010

June 24, 2011


Learn more about the CDC science and programmatic work that went into the “Ten Great Public Health Achievements — Worldwide, 2001–2010” at these links:


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MMWR: Ten Great Public Health Achievements — United States, 2001–2010

May 20, 2011


Learn more about the CDC science and programmatic work that went into the “Ten Great Public Health Achievements — United States, 2001–2010” at these links:


TABLE. Healthy People 2010 improvements related to public health achievements --- United States*

Area of public health achievement

Healthy People 2010 objective measure

Improvement

Vaccine-preventable diseases

Vaccination of each U.S. birth cohort with current childhood immunization schedule

14-24a. Proportion of children aged 19--35 months receiving the recommended vaccines

From 73% (1998) to 78% (2008)

Pneumococcal disease

14-22g. Children aged 19--35 months receiving ≥4 doses of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

From 20% (2002) to 80% (2008)

Varicella

14-22f. Children aged 19--35 months receiving ≥1 dose of the varicella vaccine
14-27d. Adolescents aged 13--15 years receiving ≥1 dose of the varicella vaccine (excluding those who have reported having varicella)

From 43% (1998) to 91% (2008) (14-22f) and from 45% (1997) to 86% (2008) (14-27d)

Hepatitis A

14-6. New cases of hepatitis A (per 100,000 population)

From 11.2 (1997) to 0.9 (2008)

Prevention and control of infectious diseases

Tuberculosis cases

14-11. New cases of tuberculosis (per 100,000 population)

From 6.6 (1998) to 4.2 (2008)

Central line--associated blood stream infections

14-20b. Hospital-acquired central line--associated bloodstream infections among intensive-care unit patients (per 1,000 days use)

From 5.5 (1995-98) to 1.6 (2009)

Tobacco

Adult tobacco use

27-1a. Cigarette smoking among adults aged ≥18 years (age-adjusted)

From 24% (1998) to 21% (2008)

Youth tobacco use

27-2b. Cigarette smoking among students (grades 9--12)

From 35% (1999) to 19% (2009)

States with comprehensive smoke-free laws

27-13a, b, c, i. Smoke-free indoor air laws (specific to private workplaces, public workplaces, restaurants, and bars).

From zero (1998) to 30 (2009) states (27-13a), 10 (1998) to 34 (2009) states (27-13b), one (1998) to 28 (2009) states (27-13c), and zero (1998) to 22 states (2009) (27-13i)

Combined average federal and average state excise tax

27-21a. Combined average federal and state tax on cigarettes (dollars per standard U.S. package of cigarettes)

From $0.63 (1998) to $2.35 (2009)

Maternal and infant health

Pregnancies affected by neural tube defects

16-15. Live births and fetal deaths at ≥20 weeks gestation with diagnoses of spina bifida and other neural tube defects (new cases per 10,000 live births)

From six (1996) to five (2007)

Newborn hearing screening

28-11a. Newborns receiving an objective
physiologic hearing screening procedure before age 1 month

From 66% (2001) to 82% (2007)

Motor vehicle safety

Deaths per 100,000 persons per vehicle mile traveled

15-15a. Motor vehicle deaths (age-adjusted per 100,000 standard population)
15-15b. Motor vehicle deaths (per 100 million vehicle miles traveled)

From 14.7 (1999) to 13.8 (2007) (15-15a) and from 1.6 (1998) to 1.3 (2008) (15-15b)

Injuries per 100,000 persons per vehicle mile traveled

15-17. Nonfatal motor vehicle injuries (per 100,000 population)

From 1,181 (1998) to 771 (2008)

Pedestrian deaths

15-16. Pedestrian deaths on public roads (per 100,000 population)

From 1.9 (1998) to 1.5 (2008)

Cardiovascular disease prevention

Age-adjusted coronary heart disease deaths

12-1. Coronary heart disease deaths (age-adjusted per 100,000 population)

From 195 (1999) to 126 (2007)

Age-adjusted stroke deaths

12-7. Stroke deaths (age-adjusted per 100,000 population)

From 62 (1999) to 42 (2007)

Occupational safety

Work-related injury deaths

20-1a. Work-related injury deaths -- all industries (per 100,000 workers aged ≥16 years)

From 4.5 (1998) to 3.3 (2009)

Work-related injuries

20-2a. Work-related injuries -- all industries (per 100 full-time workers)

From 6.2 (1998) to 3.4 (2009)

Cancer prevention

Colorectal cancer death rate per year

3-5. Colorectal cancer deaths (age-adjusted per 100,000 standard population)

From 20.9 (1999) to 16.9 (2007)

Breast cancer death rate per year

3-3. Female breast cancer deaths (age-adjusted per 100,000 standard population)

From 26.6 (1999) to 22.9 (2007)

Cervical cancer death rate per year

3-4. Cervical cancer deaths (age-adjusted per 100,000 standard population)

From 2.8 (1999) to 2.4 (2007)

Childhood lead poisoning prevention

% of children with blood lead levels ≥10 μg/dL

8-11. Children aged 1--5 years with blood lead levels ≥10 μg/dL

From 4.4% (1991--1994) to level too small for reliable measurement (2005--2008)

Public health preparedness and response

No related Healthy People 2010 objectives

Source: DATA2010 (Healthy People 2010 database). Available at http://wonder.cdc.gov/data2010.

* Most recent data available. The Healthy People 2010 Final Review will be published in fall 2011; data presented in this table might not be final.

Additional information available at http://wonder.cdc.gov/data2010.



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