Social Media

Use or customize these messages on your social media platforms to share the importance of infant immunization during National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW), April 25-May 2, 2020.

fb icon Facebook Messages

Invite your page’s followers to NIIW events, share photos of NIIW activities, post links to new scientific research, or use these sample posts. Be sure to follow CDC on its Facebook page.

  • National Infant Immunization Week is a great time to learn about the vaccines your baby needs! Visit CDC’s site to learn about the 14 diseases vaccines prevent, view the latest immunization schedule, and get tips on how to comfort your baby during vaccine visits: https://go.usa.gov/xEspJexternal icon
  • “Is it okay to delay a few of my baby’s vaccines, if I plan to get them all eventually?” “Does breastfeeding provide full protection against vaccine-preventable diseases?” It’s normal to have questions about vaccines; get answers to your common questions: https://go.usa.gov/xEsss external icon
  • Can you name all 14 diseases that childhood vaccines protect against? Visit CDC’s vaccine website for parents to learn about these diseases, their symptoms, and how they are spread: https://go.usa.gov/xEsAkexternal icon
  • Watch CDC’s “How Vaccines Work” video to find out how vaccines help babies fight infections by strengthening their immune systems: https://bit.ly/2HpKScqexternal icon
  • Spreading out or skipping shots increases the chance your child will get a disease that vaccines prevent. Check out these 6 reasons why you should vaccinate your child according to CDC’s recommended schedule: https://go.usa.gov/xEsAWexternal icon
  • It’s National Infant Immunization Week! Pregnant? Getting vaccinated against whooping cough in your 3rd trimester to help protect your baby from the start. To learn more, watch: https://bit.ly/2VYAWuvexternal icon
  • Measles can be dangerous, especially for babies and young children. During National Infant Immunization Week, learn more about measles and how to protect your child: https://go.usa.gov/xEssnexternal icon
  • Before there was a vaccine, mumps was the leading cause for viral encephalitis (swelling of the brain) and sudden hearing loss in the United States. National Infant Immunization Week is a great time to learn more about protecting your child from mumps: https://go.usa.gov/xEssUexternal icon
  • Chickenpox can be serious, especially for babies. It can lead to dehydration, pneumonia, or swelling of the brain. During National Infant Immunization week, learn how you can protect your child with chickenpox vaccine: https://go.usa.gov/xEssV external icon
  • It’s National Infant Immunization Week! Getting vaccines for your baby is important, but how do you make it less stressful? Check out these practical tips to help both you and your baby: https://go.usa.gov/xEssKexternal icon
  • La Semana Nacional de Inmunización Infantil es un excelente momento para informarte sobre las vacunas que tu bebé necesita. Visita el sitio web de los CDC para saber sobre las 14 enfermedades que las vacunas previenen, ver el calendario de vacunación más reciente y leer consejos sobre cómo reconfortar a tu bebé durante las visitas de vacunación. https://go.usa.gov/xEspJexternal icon
  • “¿Está bien retrasar algunas de las vacunas de mi bebé si planeo ponérselas todas en algún momento?” “¿Provee el amamantamiento una protección completa contra las enfermedades que se pueden prevenir con las vacunas?” Es normal tener preguntas acerca de las vacunas; obtén las respuestas a tus preguntas comunes: https://go.usa.gov/xEsss external icon
  • ¿Puedes nombrar las 14 enfermedades contra las cuales las vacunas infantiles protegen? Visita el sitio web de los CDC con información para padres sobre las vacunas para saber sobre estas enfermedades, sus síntomas y cómo se propagan: https://go.usa.gov/xEsAkexternal icon
  • Mira el video “How Vaccines Work” (Cómo funcionan las vacunas) de los CDC para averiguar cómo las vacunas ayudan a los bebés a luchar contra las infecciones al fortalecerles el sistema inmunitario: https://bit.ly/2HpKScqexternal icon
  • Estirar el tiempo entre vacunas o saltarse algunas aumenta las probabilidades de que tu hijo contraiga una enfermedad que se previene con vacunas. Lee estas 6 razones por las cuales deberías vacunar a tu hijo de acuerdo con el calendario de vacunación recomendado por los CDC: https://go.usa.gov/xEsAWexternal icon
  • ¡Es la Semana Nacional de Inmunización Infantil! ¿Estás embarazada? Ponte la vacuna contra la tosferina durante el 3.er trimestre para ayudar a proteger a tu bebé desde el principio. Para saber más, mira: https://bit.ly/2VYAWuvexternal icon
  • El sarampión puede ser peligroso, especialmente para los bebés y los niños pequeños. Durante la Semana Nacional de Inmunización Infantil infórmate más sobre el sarampión y cómo proteger a tu hijo: https://go.usa.gov/xEssnexternal icon
  • Antes de que existiera la vacuna, las paperas eran la principal causa de encefalitis viral (infección del cerebro) y de pérdida auditiva repentina en los Estados Unidos. La Semana Nacional de Inmunización Infantil es un excelente momento para aprender más sobre cómo proteger a tu hijo contra las paperas: https://go.usa.gov/xEssUexternal icon
  • La varicela puede ser grave, especialmente para los bebés. Puede causar deshidratación, neumonía e inflamación del cerebro. Infórmate sobre cómo puedes proteger a tu hijo con la vacuna contra la varicela durante esta Semana Nacional de Inmunización Infantil: https://go.usa.gov/xEssV external icon
  • ¡Es la Semana Nacional de Inmunización Infantil! Ponerle vacunas inyectables a tu bebé es muy importante, pero ¿cómo hacerlo menos estresante? Revisa estos consejos prácticos para ayudarte a ti y a tu bebé. https://go.usa.gov/xEssKexternal icon
  • It’s National Infant Immunization Week! Want to improve your vaccination conversations with parents? Parents feel more comfortable choosing to vaccinate their child if you take time to answer their questions and share your positive, personal experiences with vaccines. CDC has resources to help:  https://go.usa.gov/xEssMexternal icon
  • Clinicians: CDC has a new free CE activity called How Nurses and Medical Assistants Can Foster a Culture of Immunization in the Practice to share with your staff during NIIW. This online activity teaches practical strategies to improve vaccination rates in a practice, including how to deliver clear and concise vaccine recommendations and address parents’ frequently asked questions.
  • Do you spend a lot of time talking to parents about vaccines?  CDC, AAP, and AAFP have resources to help you talk with parents about vaccines. Check them out during National Infant Immunization Week—April 25-May 2, 2020: https://go.usa.gov/xEsshexternal icon
  • It’s important to have vaccine conversations with parents well ahead of their child’s first vaccine appointment at 2 months. By doing so, you play a vital role in helping parents choose to protect their baby with the recommended immunization schedule.
  • Clinicians: CDC’s parent-friendly immunization schedule provides information on vaccine-preventable diseases and the vaccines that prevent them. Provide them at the 1-week appointment so parents can ask questions before the 2-month well-child visit when vaccines are first given.
  • It’s National Infant Immunization Week! Looking for best practices for talking about vaccines with patients? CDC’s NCIRD Director, Dr. Nancy Messonnier, shares 5 research-based strategies to help you improve your vaccine conversations with parents: https://wb.md/2rh5j2Aexternal icon
  • It’s National Infant Immunization Week! All staff in pediatric practices play a role in supporting parents’ decisions to vaccinate. Use this slide deck to train your staff on how to create a culture of immunization within your practice:https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/partners/childhood/professionals.html#presentation-10-ways
  • Clinicians: CDC produced a video for parents that takes viewers on the journey of a childhood vaccine from development through safety monitoring after a vaccine is licensed and introduced in the population. The 5-minute video explains the three phases of clinical trials, vaccine manufacturing, and how a vaccine is added to the U.S. recommended immunization schedule. Please share the video with parents and link to it from your website and social media channels: https://bit.ly/2F8x9Wgexternal icon
  • National Infant Immunization Week is April 25-May 2. Do you need materials in Spanish for your patients?  CDC has information about each vaccine-preventable disease: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/partners/childhood/spanish.html

twitter icon Twitter Messages

Share ongoing updates, resources, and activities related to NIIW and infant immunization in general. Connect with other supporters and make your tweets searchable by using #NIIW and #ivax2protect in all of your tweets. Be sure to follow @CDCgov on Twitter before and during NIIW.

insta icon Instagram Messages

Take a photo of an NIIW event poster and post it as an invitation to your page’s followers.  You can also share photos of NIIW activities and make your posts searchable by using #NIIW and #ivax2protect in all of your messages. Be sure to follow @CDCgov on Instagram.

  •  [Download image of measles; see https://phil.cdc.gov or CDC “measles-vpd” image] Did you know that #measles germs can linger in a room long after a sick person has left it? Measles can be dangerous, especially for babies and young children. National Infant Immunization Week is the perfect time to learn more about measles and how to protect your child. https://go.usa.gov/xE6jfexternal icon  #NIIW #ivax2protect
  • [Download image of mumps; see https://phil.cdc.gov or CDC “mumps-vpd” image] Did you know that more than 6,300 cases of #mumps were reported in the United States in 2016? Before there was a vaccine, mumps was the leading cause for viral encephalitis (infection of the brain) and sudden deafness in the U.S. National Infant Immunization Week is the perfect time to learn more about mumps and how to protect your child. https://go.usa.gov/xE6j7external icon #NIIW #ivax2protect
  • Before the #chickenpox vaccine was available, about 4 million people got chickenpox in the U.S. every year. Chickenpox can be serious, especially for babies. It can lead to dehydration, pneumonia (an infection in the lungs), or swelling of the brain. This National Infant Immunization Week, learn more about chickenpox and the shot that can prevent it. https://go.usa.gov/xE6jHexternal icon #NIIW #ivax2protect
Page last reviewed: March 9, 2020