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Immunization Courses: Webcasts and Self Study

About this Page

CDC offers continuing education (CE) credits for several self-study programs on immunization. These can be accessed in a variety of ways: DVD, CD, web-based, and podcasts.

Most CE credit from these programs is free and easy to access through the training and CE online system. If needed, assistance with obtaining CE credit or printing the certificate is available.

Click the course name in the table below to see its description, intended audience, format , CE details, and any needed materials and resources. Other details include registration, objectives, presenters/faculty, and satellite technical specifications, etc.

Terms used on this page are defined at bottom of page.

CDC-INFO’s correspondence process has changed. The email box is not actively monitored; please submit questions via the CDC-INFO online form.

Some courses offer continuing education (CE).

To receive continuing education (CE) or print a certificate, please visit TCEO and follow these 9 Simple Steps.

If you do not need CE, but require a certificate for training requirements, please select CEU as the type of continuing education you’d like to earn.

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For additional immunization training, see

Courses

Immunization Courses Offered
Course Name & link to details Brief Description Format
General Best Practice Guidelines for Immunization The General Best Practice Guidelines for Immunization publication updates and replaces the General Recommendations on Immunization: Recommendations of the ACIP last published in 2011. The field of immunization is marked by constant change, including licensing of new vaccines, new vaccination recommendations, and new findings about how vaccines work and their adverse events. These guidelines provide clinicians and other health care providers with ACIP’s best practices guidance on immunization. Posted: Apr 2017 Self-paced document averaging 3 hours
HPV Vaccine: Same Way, Same Day Communication between providers and parents is key to improving HPV vaccination. HPV Vaccine: Same Way, Same Day is a brief, interactive role-play simulation designed to enhance healthcare providers’ ability to introduce the HPV vaccine and address HPV vaccine hesitant parents’ concerns. In this app, you will practice techniques to introduce and discuss the vaccine with parents and patients, including those who may be hesitant to immunize. It is ideal for immunization education and provider training.
Posted: Jun 2018
Self-paced mobile app available for download from the Google Play store and the Apple iTunes store
HPV Vaccine: A Shot of Cancer Prevention CE activity for physicians, nurses, and pharmacists who recommend or provide vaccinations to preteens and teens. The goals of this activity are to increase clinician recognition of the burden of HPV-related disease and to increase understanding of ACIP vaccine recommendations for HPV disease prevention through vaccination.
Posted: Aug 2012
Webcast – 18:45 minutes
Routinely Recommending Cancer Prevention: HPV Vaccination at 11 and 12 as a Standard of Care CDC recommends HPV vaccine for adolescents at 11-12 years of age. Physicians discuss how they ensure they meet the standard of care by making effective HPV vaccine recommendations and answering parents’ top vaccine questions in this web-on-demand video.
Posted: January 2018
Webcast – 60 minutes
You Are the Key to HPV Cancer Prevention – Train the Trainer CE activity for immunization providers. Low HPV vaccination rates are leaving another generation of boys and girls vulnerable to devastating HPV cancers. Vaccination could prevent most of these cancers. CDC is looking to you to make an effective recommendation for HPV vaccination when kids are 11 and 12 years old. Provided in this presentation is up-to-date information on HPV infection/disease, HPV vaccine, ACIP recommendations, and ways to successfully communicate with patients and their parents about HPV vaccination. Find out how to reduce missed opportunities by recommending HPV vaccine the same way and same day you recommend other routinely recommended adolescent vaccines.
Posted: Oct 2017
Webcast – about 65 minutes
You are the Key to HPV Cancer Prevention—2018 CE activity for immunization providers. HPV vaccination is cancer prevention. While most U.S. adolescents are starting the HPV vaccine series, less than half have finished the HPV vaccine series. Every year that adolescents aren’t vaccinated is another year they are left unprotected against cancer-causing infections. A clinician recommendation plays a critical role in getting parents to accept HPV vaccination for their child.

CDC is looking to you to make an effective recommendation for HPV vaccination for all your 11-12 year old patients. This presentation is intended to support you in making effective recommendations and answering parents’ questions. Provided in this presentation is up-to-date information on HPV infection/disease, HPV vaccine, and ways to successfully communicate with parents about HPV vaccination.
Posted: March 2018

Webcast – about 65 minutes
Immunization: You Call the Shots A series of modules designed to provide vaccine recommendations, links to resource materials, and self-tests to assess learning.
Updated: Feb 2015
Self-paced web-based modules.  Averaging 60 to 90 minutes per module
Influenza Vaccination Recommendations, 2017-2018 Influenza (flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness. Flu can also result in serious outcomes such as hospitalization or death. Older adults, young children and people with certain health conditions are at high risk for serious complications from flu.  The best way to prevent the flu is by getting vaccinated each year.

This recommendation for annual vaccination means that healthcare providers should remain up-to-date with their knowledge of influenza vaccination and practices. The knowledge gap this training addresses includes information every vaccine provider should know about influenza, the various influenza vaccines, ACIP vaccine recommendations, storage and handling requirements, and administration considerations.
Original Broadcast: Dec 2016

Webcast – about 38 minutes
Keys to Storing and Handling Your Vaccine Supply—2018 One of the most important safeguards for the nation’s vaccine supply is proper storage and handling. This video is designed to decrease vaccine storage and handling errors by demonstrating recommended best practices and addressing frequently asked questions (FAQs).
Posted: April 2018
Web-on-demand – about 50 minutes
Perinatal Hepatitis B Coordinators Orientation—Module 1: Program Overview The Perinatal Hepatitis B Prevention Program (PHBPP) was established in 1990 by CDC. Orientation and trainings have been provided to coordinators in the past in various formats and venues. This series will combine aspects of both training on the epidemiology of hepatitis B virus and orientation to the PHBHPP in a web-based format. It presents both practice-based and program oriented content on Perinatal Hepatitis B. It addresses an educational need of an importance audience for the prevention of perinatal hepatitis B transmission, the new PHBPP Coordinator. This web-on-demand video will allow both new and experienced coordinators to improve their knowledge of perinatal hepatitis B and program management skills.

The multi-session series presents core knowledge necessary for a PHBPP Coordinator to possess to be successful in their position in concise web-based platform. The creation of this series is a direct result of requests from Coordinators for a web based training course with available continuing education.
Posted: March 2018

Web-on-demand – about 65 minutes
Pertussis: Coughing up the Facts on Pertussis — Emerging Trends and Vaccine Recommendations CE activity for immunization providers. This course reviews the clinical presentation of pertussis, how to test and treat appropriately, and who to vaccinate and when. Participants will also learn about emerging trends in pertussis reporting across the U.S.
Original Broadcast: Nov 2014
Webcast – about 45 minutes
Surveillance of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases Key information for public health staff charged with surveillance of vaccine-preventable diseases, case investigation, and outbreak control.
Updated Broadcast: Nov/Dec 2017
Webcast
Teaching Immunization for Medical Education (TIME) Ready-to-use instructional materials that can be integrated into existing medical school curricula. Available from the Association for Prevention Teaching and Research. Multi-station clinical teaching scenarios targeting medical students
Webinar Series for Pink Book This online series of 15 webinars provides an overview of the principles of vaccination, general recommendations, immunization strategies for providers, and specific information about vaccine-preventable diseases and the vaccines that prevent them.
Posted: Oct 2015
Fifteen 60 to 90 minute modules, available as webinars

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General Best Practice Guidelines for Immunization

Target Audience: Immunization Providers (Physicians, Nurses, Nurse Practitioners, Pharmacists, Physician’s Assistants, DoD Paraprofessionals, Medical Students, etc.)

Description: The General Best Practice Guidelines for Immunization publication updates and replaces the General Recommendations on Immunization: Recommendations of ACIP published in 2011. It is organized into the following 10 sections: 1) Timing and Spacing of Immunobiologics; 2) Contraindications and Precautions; 3) Preventing and Managing Adverse Reactions; 4) Vaccine Administration; 5) Storage and Handling of Immunobiologics; 6) Altered Immunocompetence; 7) Special Situations; 8) Vaccination Records; 9) Vaccination Programs; and 10) Vaccine Information Sources.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify valid contraindications for commonly used vaccines.
  2. Describe the minimum spacing between doses for vaccines routinely used in the United States.
  3. Describe recommended practices for administration of vaccines.
  4. Identify evidence-based interventions shown to improve vaccination rates among children.
  5. Implement disease detection and prevention health care services (e.g., smoking cessation, weight reduction, diabetes screening, blood pressure screening, immunization services) to prevent health problems and maintain health.

CME: Valid through April 20, 2019.

Video, Transcript, and CE Details: General Best Practice Guidelines for Immunization course #WB2900

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HPV Vaccine: Same Way, Same Day

Description: Communication between providers and parents is key to improving HPV vaccination. HPV Vaccine: Same Way, Same Day is a brief, interactive role-play simulation designed to enhance healthcare providers’ ability to introduce the HPV vaccine and address HPV vaccine hesitant parents’ concerns. In this app, you will practice techniques to introduce and discuss the vaccine with parents and patients, including those who may be hesitant to immunize. It is ideal for immunization education and provider training.

Format: Self-paced mobile app available for download from the Google Play store and the Apple iTunes store

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HPV Vaccine: A Shot of Cancer Prevention

MEDSCAPE CME: This CME activity is a roundtable discussion on HPV vaccine developed for distribution on Medscape. It can be accessed at “MedscapeCME” at http://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/768633

Target Audience: This activity is intended for pediatricians, physicians in primary care and family medicine, pediatric nurses, nurse practitioners, and other healthcare professionals involved in the treatment, management, and prevention of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related disease in adolescents and/or young men and women at risk for HPV infection.

Description: CE activity for physicians, nurses, and pharmacists who recommend or provide vaccinations to preteens and teens. The goals of this activity are to increase clinician recognition of the burden of HPV-related disease and to increase understanding of Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations for HPV disease prevention through vaccination.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe the cancer risks that have been linked to HPV infection
  2. Apply the ACIP vaccine recommendations for HPV immunization to practice

CE is no longer available for this product.

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Routinely Recommending Cancer Prevention: HPV Vaccination at 11 and 12 as a Standard of Care

Description: CDC recommends HPV vaccine for adolescents at 11-12 years of age.  Physicians discuss how they ensure they meet the standard of care by making effective HPV vaccine recommendations and answering parents’ top vaccine questions in this web-on-demand video released.

CME: Valid through January 16, 2020.

Video, Transcript, and CE Details: HPV course #WD2910

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You Are the Key to HPV Cancer Prevention – Train the Trainer

Target Audience: Immunization Providers (Physicians, Nurses, Nurse Practitioners, Pharmacists, Physician’s Assistants, DoD Paraprofessionals, Medical Students, etc.)

Description: Low HPV vaccination rates are leaving another generation of boys and girls vulnerable to devastating HPV cancers. Vaccination could prevent most of these cancers. CDC is looking to you to make an effective recommendation for HPV vaccination when kids are 11 and 12 years old. Provided in this presentation is up-to-date information on HPV infection/disease, HPV vaccine, ACIP recommendations, and ways to successfully communicate with patients and their parents about HPV vaccination. Find out how to reduce missed opportunities by recommending HPV vaccine the same way and same day you recommend other routinely recommended adolescent vaccines.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe why HPV vaccination is important for cancer prevention.
  2. Identify the appropriate HPV vaccination schedule based on patient age.
  3. Describe effective HPV vaccine recommendations for patients age 11 or 12, and age 13 and older.
  4. Recognize self-efficacy in delivering effective HPV vaccination recommendations.
  5. Identify reassuring, confident, and concise responses to parental questions about HPV vaccination.
  6. Implement disease detection and prevention health care services (e.g., smoking cessation, weight reduction, diabetes screening, blood pressure screening, immunization services) to prevent health problems and maintain health.

CME: Valid through October 26, 2019.

Video, Transcript, and CE Details: HPV course #WD2911

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You are the Key to HPV Cancer Prevention

Target Audience: Immunization Providers (Physicians, Nurses, Nurse Practitioners, Pharmacists, Physician’s Assistants, Dentists, DoD Paraprofessionals, Medical Students, etc.)

Description: HPV vaccination is cancer prevention. While most U.S. adolescents are starting the HPV vaccine series, less than half have finished the HPV vaccine series. Every year that adolescents aren’t vaccinated is another year they are left unprotected against cancer-causing infections. A clinician recommendation plays a critical role in getting parents to accept HPV vaccination for their child.

CDC is looking to you to make an effective recommendation for HPV vaccination for all your 11-12 year old patients. This presentation is intended to support you in making effective recommendations and answering parents’ questions.  Provided in this presentation is up-to-date information on HPV infection/disease, HPV vaccine, and ways to successfully communicate with parents about HPV vaccination.

Learning Objectives

  1. Define the importance of HPV vaccination for cancer prevention and the rationale for vaccinating at ages 11 or 12.
  2. Describe the indications for HPV vaccine for girls and for boys.
  3. List two components of an effective HPV vaccine recommendation.
  4. Identify relevant and compelling information to share with parents about HPV vaccine to help inform their decision to get HPV vaccine for their child.
  5. Implement disease detection and prevention health care services (e.g., smoking cessation, weight reduction, diabetes screening, blood pressure screening, immunization services) to prevent health problems and maintain health.

CME: Valid through April 11, 2020.

CE Details: HPV course # WD4019

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Immunization: You Call the Shots

Description: This web-based course is an interactive, self-study program consisting of a series of modules covering all aspects of immunization. The modules provide basic vaccine content, links to resource materials, a comprehensive glossary, and self-tests to assess learning.

Audience: Practicing nurses and nursing students, medical assistants, pharmacists, and other health professionals who provide immunizations. The course is designed for immunization providers who are new to immunization or for those who need a refresher.

Format: Interactive web-based program.

Produced by: The Association for Prevention Teaching and Research, in collaboration with CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.

To View or Order: More information and link to all available modules

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Influenza Vaccination Recommendations, 2017-2018

Title:  Influenza Vaccine 2017-2018—Vaccine Storage, Handling‎, and Administration FAQs

This video addresses frequently asked questions (FAQs) about influenza (flu) vaccine storage, handling, and administration recommendations and best practices.

Health care providers should remain up to date on flu vaccination best practices. The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses and can cause mild to severe illness, sometimes resulting in serious outcomes such as hospitalization or death. Older adults, young children, and people with certain health conditions are at high risk for serious complications from flu. The best way to prevent the flu is by getting vaccinated each year.

Description: Influenza (flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness. Flu can also result in serious outcomes such as hospitalization or death. Older adults, young children and people with certain health conditions are at high risk for serious complications from flu. The best way to prevent the flu is by getting vaccinated each year.

This recommendation for annual vaccination means that healthcare providers should remain up-to-date with their knowledge of influenza vaccination and practices. The knowledge gap this training addresses includes information every vaccine provider should know about influenza, the various influenza vaccines, ACIP vaccine recommendations, storage and handling requirements, and administration considerations.

Video: Influenza Vaccination Recommendations, 2017-2018

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Perinatal Hepatitis B Coordinators Orientation—Module 1: Program Overview

Target Audience: Immunization Providers (Physicians, Nurses, Nurse Practitioners, Pharmacists, Physician’s Assistants, DoD Paraprofessionals, Medical Students, etc.)

Description: The Perinatal Hepatitis B Prevention Program (PHBPP) was established in 1990 by CDC. Orientation and trainings have been provided to coordinators in the past in various formats and venues. This series will combine aspects of both training on the epidemiology of hepatitis B virus and orientation to the PHBHPP in a web-based format. It presents both practice-based and program oriented content on Perinatal Hepatitis B. It addresses an educational need of an importance audience for the prevention of perinatal hepatitis B transmission, the new PHBPP Coordinator. This web-on-demand video will allow both new and experienced coordinators to improve their knowledge of perinatal hepatitis B and program management skills.

The multi-session series presents core knowledge necessary for a PHBPP Coordinator to posses to be successful in their position in concise web-based platform. The creation of this series is a direct result of requests from Coordinators for a web based training course with available continuing education.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the purpose of the Perinatal Hepatitis B Prevention Program (PHBPP).
  • Identify the required PHBPP program objectives.
  • Describe the relationship between the PHBPP objectives and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) Hepatitis Recommendations.
  • Describe 2 activities that can be implemented to achieve the program objectives.
  • Identify 3 key program data sources.
  • Describe 1 way to use key data sources to improve program outcomes.
  • Implement disease detection and prevention health care services (e.g., smoking cessation, weight reduction, diabetes screening, blood pressure screening, immunization services) to prevent health problems and maintain health.

CME: Valid through March 28, 2018.

Video, Transcript, and CE Details: Perihepb course # WD2895

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Pertussis: Coughing up the Facts on Pertussis — Emerging Trends and Vaccine Recommendations

Target Audience: Immunization Providers (Physicians, Nurses, Nurse Practitioners, Pharmacists, Physician’s Assistants, DoD Paraprofessionals, Medical Students, etc.)

Description: CE activity for immunization providers. This course reviews the clinical presentation of pertussis, how to test and treat appropriately, and who to vaccinate and when. Participants will also learn about emerging trends in pertussis reporting across the U.S.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe background on pertussis, including clinical course, key features, and spectrum of illness in infants, children, adolescents and adults.
  2. Review treatment guidelines and identify those to prioritize for pertussis chemoprophylaxis.
  3. Briefly describe pertussis diagnostics.
  4. Describe historical and emerging trends in pertussis epidemiology. Review findings from recent vaccine effectiveness studies.
  5. Describe findings from a recent CDC study looking at molecular changes in B. pertussis.
  6. Discuss findings from recent primate studies.
  7. List recommendations to protect young infants too young to be vaccinated.
  8. Implement disease detection and prevention health care services (e.g., smoking cessation, weight reduction, diabetes screening, blood pressure screening, immunization services) to prevent health problems and maintain health.

CE is no longer available for this product.

Video, Transcript, and CE Details: Pertussis course # WD2450

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Surveillance of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

Description: Provides guidelines for vaccine-preventable disease surveillance, case investigation, and outbreak control.

Audience: Physicians, infection control practitioners, nurses, epidemiologists, laboratorians, sanitarians, disease reporters, and others who are involved in surveillance and reporting of VPDs.

Format: Archived Webcast

Produced by: CDC

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Teaching Immunization for Medical Education (TIME)

Description: This curriculum is designed for use in medical schools to support immunization instruction. The TIME modules provide ready-to-use instructional materials that can be integrated into existing medical curricula. The modules include vaccine indications and contraindications, immunization schedules, and recommendations on efficient ways to increase vaccination levels.

The materials provide student objectives, learning objectives, key teaching points, and resources.

Audience: Schools of Medicine

Format: Download from Internet

Produced by: The Association for Prevention Teaching and Research (APTR), in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the CDC.

To View or Order: For information and to download a free copy, visit the APTR website

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Terms Used on This Page

Broadcast:

Broadcasts use streaming video (played as it arrives vs. waiting for entire file to be downloaded) techniques, and you can “tune it in” using something like RealPlayer. CDC’s immunization training broadcasts are offered live. Recorded sessions are archived to be played again if you missed the live session. Broadcasts are scheduled and delivered on demand.

CE:

Continuing Education (CE). Certification programs are designed to provide training to individuals, who are required to have and maintain specific levels of knowledge and skills in their job categories, often as a legal requirement to perform their duties. Certification programs may carry credits, and may be prerequisites for licensure. Requirements vary by state and profession. Disclaimer: This is a general definition and not necessarily CDC’s or an organizations’.

CME/CNE:

Continuing Medical Education (CME) credit. Continuing Nurses Education (CNE). Educational opportunities for physicians and other health professionals (CME), nurses and nurse students (CNE) to earn required continuing professional education credits. Continuing CNE and CME requirements vary from state to state. Disclaimer: This is a general definition and not necessarily CDC’s or an organizations’.

CEU:

Continuing Education Units (CEU). Certain professions require that practitioners earn a specific number of CEUs per year to ensure that they are up-to-date with current practices in their field. Proof of credits earned is necessary in order to renew a license or certification. The annual number of CEUs required varies by state and profession. Disclaimer: This is a general definition and not necessarily CDC’s or an organizations’.

NetConference:

CDC’s immunization training courses use a NetConference service that reserves for a specified date and time for a limited number of participants. A NetConference Coordinator monitors the session and is available to assist the presenters and participants. You can view the presentation slides while listening to the presenters. After the presentation concludes, the presenters address participant’s questions.

On Demand:

Training sessions are made available to you whenever you need it. An example is a TV show that can be watched whenever you want.

Podcast:

Podcasting is a form of audio broadcasting on the internet. An audio broadcast can be downloaded on your computer with some music software such as Media Player or iTunes.

Questions and Answers:

Questions submitted during NetConference/webcasts, including faxed and e-mailed questions not answered on-air.

Resources:

Links to resources discussed during the broadcasts/webcasts.

Streaming Technology:

Data streaming, commonly seen in the forms of audio and video streaming, is when a multimedia file can be played back without being completely downloaded first. An example is watching and listening to videos via YouTube in ‘real time’.

Slides:

PowerPoint presentations for each segment of the broadcasts/webcasts.

Updates and Clarifications:

Information that has changed since the broadcasts/webcasts, and explanations or clarifications of topics discussed during the webcast.

Webcast:

A webcast is a presentation shown on the web using streaming technology to many listeners/viewers at the same time. You can see it either live or ‘on demand’. Essentially, webcasting is “broadcasting” over the Internet. It does not allow interaction between you and the presenter.

Webinar:

Short for web-based seminar, a webinar is a presentation, lecture, workshop or seminar that is transmitted over the web. A key feature of a webinar is its interactive elements: the ability to give, receive and discuss information.

 

Please note that some of our training products do not reflect changes in CDC-INFO’s new operating hours. CDC-INFO’s hours of operation are 8:00am to 8:00pm Monday through Friday, Eastern Standard Time (EST). CDC-INFO will be closed overnight (8:00pm to 8:00am EST), Saturdays and Sundays, and on major federal holidays (New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veteran’s Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day).

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