World TB Day 2019

Digital Media Toolkit

 

Each year, we recognize World TB Day on March 24. This annual event commemorates the date in 1882 when Dr. Robert Koch announced his discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacillus that causes tuberculosis (TB). The 2019 World TB Day theme is It’s Time. The information below may be helpful in planning communication activities to inform and educate partners, stakeholders, and media about TB-related problems and solutions, and the importance of supporting worldwide TB control efforts.

  • World TB Day is a time to recognize achievements in TB prevention and control, and renew our commitment to ending this devastating disease in the United States.
  • Too many people in the U.S. still suffer from TB disease. We must continue to find and treat cases of active TB disease and also test and treat latent TB infection to prevent progression to disease and turn TB elimination into a reality.
  • Clinicians, health care agencies, and community organizations, especially those serving at-risk populations, have a critical role in TB elimination.
  • TB anywhere is TB everywhere. TB is an airborne disease that is transmitted from person to person. To end TB, we must continue to work together to fight this epidemic on multiple fronts, and stop the suffering associated with this disease, here at home – and around the world.

Key Messages Cdc-pdf[PDF – 674 KB]

  • It’s time to test and treat latent TB infection.
    • Expanding targeted testing and treatment of latent TB infection is key to eliminating TB disease in the United States.
    • Up to 13 million people in the United States have latent TB infection, and without treatment, are at risk for developing TB disease in the future.
    • CDC continues to recommend the use of the short-course combination regimen of once-weekly isoniazid-rifapentine for 12 weeks (3HP) for treatment of latent TB infection. Shorter treatment regimens can help patients’ complete treatment faster and with fewer side effects.
  • It’s time we strengthen TB education and awareness among health care providers.
    • There is a strong need for TB education and outreach to clinicians, health care agencies, and community organizations, especially those serving at-risk populations.
    • Many of those at high risk for latent TB infection or TB disease who need to be reached do not traditionally receive care in health departments — but are seen by private community providers and community health centers. Engaging these partners is critical to future success.
    • Misdiagnosis of TB disease still exists, and health care professionals often do not “think TB.” Limited training opportunities in TB clinical, laboratory, and research has led to a loss of expertise and experience in TB.
  • It’s time to end stigma.
    • Anyone can get TB. People with TB disease can be found in every state; in rural areas and cities; in schools, workplaces, homes; and in many other places where people are in close contact.
    • Ending TB in the United States requires maintaining and strengthening current TB control priorities while increasing efforts to identify and treat latent TB infection among high-risk populations.
    • Efforts to address latent TB infection must include public health systems and private providers who provide healthcare in the communities most affected by TB.
  • It’s time to speak up.
    • The U.S. domestic TB program is a model program for the world; committing substantial resources to domestic TB elimination, which has resulted in the United States having one of the lowest case rates globally.
    • On September 26, 2018, global leaders convened for the first ever-United Nations High-level Meeting on TB. This is an important time for the U.S. and global community to renew our commitment to end TB.
    • Achieving our national goal for TB elimination will require not only maximizing all available tools, but also continuing to engage global TB partners. These partnerships will be essential given the greater impact of TB among individuals from nations who lack comparable TB control systems.
    • Public health departments provide TB-related technical assistance, education, and outreach to clinicians, health care agencies, and community organizations.
  • It’s time to end TB.
    • World TB Day is a time to recognize achievements in TB prevention and control, and renew our commitment to ending this devastating disease in the United States.
    • TB is preventable and curable. Yet, too many people in the United States still suffer from this disease.
    • TB elimination would have widespread health, economic, and social benefits for our country.
    • A typical TB case in the United States costs $19,000 to treat and requires at least 180 days of medication, plus x-rays, lab tests, and follow-up and testing of contacts.

World TB Day Twitter Storm

On March 22 at 8:00 am EDT, the Twitter Storm begins!  During the times below, @CDC_TB will be tweeting about a specific TB message throughout the hour.

  • 8:00 am-9:00 am EDT: It’s time to speak up.
  • 9:00 am-10:00 am EDT: It’s time we strengthen TB education and awareness among health care providers.
  • 11:00 am-12:00 pm EDT: It’s time to share TB stories.
  • 12:00 pm-1:00 pm EDT: It’s time to test and treat latent TB infection.
  • 2:00 pm-3:00 pm EDT: It’s time to end stigma.
  • 3:00 pm-4:00 pm EDT: It’s time to end TB.

We invite you to participate as much as you can and as often as you can by tweeting your own content and images related to these messages at the appropriate time.

Please use at least one of the World TB Day hashtags (#EndTB, #WorldTBDay, #ItsTime) in your tweets.


Use sample content on Twitter, Facebook, or other social media platforms. We encourage you to incorporate the hashtags #EndTB, #WorldTBDay, and #ItsTime to get World TB Day content trending!

  • Facebook
    • Today is World TB Day, marking the day in 1882 when Dr. Robert Koch announced the discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB). Dr. Koch’s discovery was the most important step taken toward the prevention and control of this deadly disease. Learn how new tests, shorter treatment regimens, and a focus on latent TB infection will help end TB in the U.S. https://www.cdc.gov/tb/worldtbday
    • March 24 is World TB Day. Too many people in the U.S. still suffer from tuberculosis (TB). Efforts to improve awareness, testing, and treatment of latent TB infection and TB disease among high-risk groups are critical to eliminate TB in the U.S. Learn more: https://www.cdc.gov/tb/worldtbday
    • World TB Day is an opportunity to recognize our achievements in tuberculosis (TB) prevention and control, and renew our commitment to eliminating this devastating disease in the United States. Clinicians, health care agencies, and community organizations, especially those serving at-risk populations, have a critical role in TB elimination. It’s time to end TB! https://www.cdc.gov/tb/worldtbday/default.htm

Tell us about World TB Day activities in your community!
World TB Day observances are happening around the United States. Activities will be continually added as we approach World TB Day.

Add your event to our map!  Complete the World TB Day event formCdc-word and email to mdowling@cdc.gov.

Page last reviewed: February 22, 2019