MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY AT WORK

Publications

Fact Sheet: Oil and Gas Extraction Workers: How to Prevent Fatigued Driving at Work
NIOSH Publication No. 2018-126
Oil and gas workers drive long distances from their homes, lodging sites, and equipment yards to reach well sites that are often in remote areas. Fatigued (drowsy) driving is a major cause of crashes in this industry. This fact sheet gives drivers information about fatigue and tips to stay safe behind the wheel.

Fact Sheet: Oil and Gas Extraction Employers: How to Prevent Fatigued Driving at Work
NIOSH Publication No. 2018-125
Motor vehicle crashes cause over 40% of work-related deaths in the oil and gas extraction industry. Driver fatigue, which may be a result of insufficient sleep, long distances traveled to well sites, and long work shifts, is a factor in some of these crashes. This fact sheet recommends strategies for employers to manage fatigued driving among their workers.

Keep Workers Safe on the Road Infographicpdf icon
This infographic covers the human and economic impact of work-related crashes, making it a useful resource for HR or safety professionals to make a business case for a motor vehicle safety program.

Fact Sheet: Young Drivers in the Workplace: How Employers and Parents Can Help Keep Them Safe on the Road
NIOSH Publication No. 2017-207
This fact sheet gives information on workplace driving laws that are important to follow so that young drivers may gain work experience under the safest conditions possible. It also provides recommendations on how to promote safe driving and prevent motor vehicle crashes among young workers who drive as part of their job.

Fact Sheet: Emergency Medical Services Workers: How Employers Can Prevent Injuries and Exposures
NIOSH Publication No. 2017-194
This fact sheet provides results from a four-year study capturing data from EMS workers treated in emergency departments and gives employers recommendations for preventing injuries and exposures among workers.

Fact Sheet: Older Drivers in the Workplace: How Employers and Workers Can Prevent Crashes
NIOSH Publication No. 2016-116
This fact sheet gives employers and workers information on age-related physical and mental changes that may affect older workers’ driving.

Fact Sheet: Preventing Work-Related Motor Vehicle Crashes
NIOSH Publication No. 2015-111
This fact sheet recommends ways employers can keep workers safe when driving or riding in a motor vehicle on the job. It outlines components of a successful motor vehicle safety program. It ends with a checklist that employers can use to implement the recommendations.

Take Charge of Your Safety in and Around Your Patrol Vehicle
NIOSH Publication No. 2015-109
This flyer tells law enforcement officers five simple things they can do to reduce their risk of a motor vehicle crash while on duty.

Quick Sleep Tips for Truck Drivers
NIOSH Publication No. 2014-150
Driving a truck is a very demanding job. Lack of sleep makes it more difficult to meet the demands of the job and increases the risk for drowsy driving and vehicle crashes. This brochure provides truck drivers with quick tips for how to prepare for better sleep.

How to Prevent Driving-Related Injuries
NIOSH Publication No. 2012-122
This is a “Fast Facts” card on motor vehicle crash prevention for home healthcare workers.

Take Pride in Your Job: Seat Belts
NIOSH Publication No. 2009-109d
This video, designed to be used in pre-shift or weekly safety meetings, encourages oil and gas extraction workers to wear a seat belt whenever in a moving motor vehicle.

Preventing emergency vehicle crashes: status and challenges of human factors issues
Human Factors: July 2018 / [Epub ahead of print]

Work-related fatal motor vehicle traffic crashes: Matching of 2010 data from the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries and the Fatality Analysis Reporting System
Accident Analysis & Prevention: July 2016 / 92:97-106

Occupational highway transportation deaths among workers aged >/= 55 years – United States, 2003-2010
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report: August 23, 2013 / 62(33):653-657
Highway transportation incidents are the leading cause of occupational fatalities in the United States. This study reported that the fatality rate of occupational highway transportation incidents for workers aged ≥65 years was more than three times the rate for workers aged 18-54.

Motor Vehicle Fatalities Among Oil and Gas Extraction Workers
Accident Analysis & Prevention: March 2013 / 51(1):168-174
This study describes the characteristics of motor vehicle-related fatalities in the oil and gas extraction (OGE) industry using data from the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries. OGE workers had 8.5 times the fatality rate of all U.S. workers in private industry.

Short Sleep Duration Among Workers – United States, 2010
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report: April 27, 2012 / 61(16):281-285
Insufficient sleep can have serious and sometimes fatal consequences for fatigued workers and others around them. This study found that short sleep is associated with various adverse health effects on workers. It suggests the need to target interventions to increase the proportion of adults who get sufficient sleep to improve safety at work.

Occupational Highway Transportation Deaths – United States, 2003-2008
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report: April 28, 2011 / 60(16):497-502
Highway transportation crashes are the leading cause of fatal injuries in the United States for both workers and the general population. To assess trends and help guide the prevention of occupational highway transportation deaths, CDC analyzed data from the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) for 2003-2008.

The Use of Electronic Pharmacy Data to Investigate Prescribed Medications and Fatal Motor Vehicle Crashes in a Military Population, 2002-2006
Accident Analysis & Prevention: January 2010 / 42(1):261-268
The authors examined the association between prescribed medications and fatal motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) in an active duty military population between 2002 and 2006.

Nonfatal Work-related Motor Vehicle Injuries Treated in Emergency Departments in the United States, 1998-2002
American Journal of Industrial Medicine: September 2009 / 52(9):698-706
This study analyzed the national data on nonfatal injuries from work-related motor vehicle crashes. The average annual rate of these injuries was 7 per 10,000 full-time-equivalent workers. Public safety workers had the largest number of injuries, and taxicab service employees had the highest injury rate of all industries.

A review of recent accidents involving explosives transport
Proceedings of the 34th Annual Conference on Explosives and Blasting Technique: January 2008 / 2:1-12
This study reported that over the past 10 years, accidents in the U.S. during the transport of explosives used in mining and construction have resulted in 5 major injuries, 11 minor injuries, and no fatalities. The authors attribute this good safety record to diligent efforts by government, labor, and industry. To avoid serious accidents in the future, such as those that have taken place in other countries, the authors recommend that efforts to prevent these accidents in the U.S. should remain strong.

Comparison of Fatalities From Work Related Motor Vehicle Traffic Accidents in Australia, New Zealand, and the United States
Injury Prevention: October 2005 / 11(5):294-299)
This analysis compares the extent and characteristics of motor vehicle traffic incidents on public roads resulting in fatal occupational injuries in Australia, New Zealand, and the United States.

Individual, Business-Related, and Work Environment Factors Associated with Driving While Tired among Taxi Drivers in Two U.S. Metropolitan Areas
Journal of Safety Research: 2019 / 70:71-77
Violence-related events and roadway incidents are the leading causes of injury among taxi drivers. Fatigue is under-recognized and prevalent in this workforce and is associated with both injury outcomes. We describe the association of individual, business-related, and work environment factors with driving tired among taxi drivers in two very different cities.

NIOSH Center for Motor Vehicle Safety: Results from 2016 Midcourse Review
NIOSH Publication No. 2017-139
The NIOSH Center for Motor Vehicle Safety Strategic Plan for Research and Prevention, 2014-2018 outlines the Center’s five strategic goals. This document serves to feature progress highlights, more information about the Center, a big-picture analysis of internal strengths and weaknesses and external opportunities and threats, and our plans moving forward.

NIOSH Center for Motor Vehicle Safety – Performance Measures
NIOSH Publication No. 2016-164
The NIOSH Center for Motor Vehicle Safety Strategic Plan for Research and Prevention, 2014-2018 sets performance measures for each of the Center’s five strategic goals. This document serves to display progress we have made to meet these measures.

NIOSH Center for Motor Vehicle Safety – Progress Report 2016
NIOSH Publication No. 2016-163
The NIOSH Center for Motor Vehicle Safety Strategic Plan for Research and Prevention, 2014-2018 outlines the Center’s five strategic goals. This document serves to feature progress highlights, more information about the Center, a big-picture analysis of internal strengths and weaknesses and external opportunities and threats, and our plans moving forward.

Evaluation of an in-vehicle monitoring system (IVMS) to reduce risky driving behaviors in commercial drivers: Comparison of in-cab warning lights and supervisory coaching with videos of driving behavior
Journal of Safety Research: February 2017 / 60:125-136
The objective of this research was to evaluate whether two types of feedback from a commercially available in-vehicle monitoring system (IVMS) would reduce the incidence of risky driving behaviors in drivers from two companies. The largest decline in the rate of risky driving behaviors occurred when feedback included supervisory coaching in addition to real-time alerts in the vehicle.

NIOSH Center for Motor Vehicle Safety: strategic plan for research and prevention, 2014-2018
NIOSH Publication No. 2014-122
The NIOSH Center for Motor Vehicle Safety coordinates NIOSH research and prevention activities to prevent work-related motor vehicle crashes. The Center’s strategic plan describes five priorities for the Center: improving identification of risk factors for crashes; using engineering and technological solutions to prevent crashes; using management and policy changes to help employers prevent work-related crashes; engaging global partners in research and prevention; and communicating prevention recommendations to employers, workers, and others.

Fleet safety: developing & sustaining an effective program with ANSI/ASSE Z15.1
Professional Safety: March 2014 / 59(3):47-56
This article discusses the use of the ANSI/ASSE Z15.1-2012 standard to provide comprehensive guidance on fleet safety program elements and as a foundation for auditing an existing program.

A review of the literature: motor vehicle safety initiatives in the oil and gas extraction industry
SPE Americas 2013: E&P Health, Safety, Security and Environmental Conference, March 18-20, 2013, Galveston, Texas. Richardson, TX: Society of Petroleum Engineers, SPE-163738-MS, 2013 Mar; :83-95
This paper conducted a systematic review of the motor vehicle safety initiatives that have been published in the oil and gas extraction industry. The study found out that there is the need to improve the quality of research articles examining motor vehicles safety in the oil and gas extraction industry.

Transposition of EU directives related to occupational road safety by three member states
Occupational Safety in Transport Conference, September 20-21, 2012, Surfers Paradise, Queensland 4217, Australia. Queenland, Australia.
This research assesses transpositions of relevant EU directives by the United Kingdom, France, and Sweden. Although member-state transpositions were generally technically accurate, they were influenced by domestic politics, institutional arrangements, and policy beliefs.

Implementing an in-vehicle monitoring program: a guide for the oil and gas extraction industry
Protecting People and the Environment–Evolving Challenges: SPE/APPEA International Conference on Health, Safety, and Environment in Oil and Gas Exploration and Production, September 11-13, 2012, Perth, Australia. Richardson, TX: Society of Petroleum Engineers, Paper No. 156535, 2012 Sep; :394-398
This study provides information on motor vehicle crashes in the oil and gas extraction industry using in-vehicle monitoring systems (IVMS). It describes the benefits of IVMS and presents an IMVS guide developed by NIOSH partners.

NIOSH Fatal Occupational Injury Cost Fact Sheet: Transit and Ground Transportation
NIOSH Publication No. 2012-134

NIOSH Fatal Occupational Injury Cost Fact Sheet: Couriers and Messengers
NIOSH Publication No. 2012-133

Fatigue risk management: Organizational factors at the regulatory and industry/company level
Accident Analysis & Prevention: March 2011 / 43(2):573-590
This study describes fatigue risk management systems in different transport modes. It suggests that in order to meet their responsibilities to manage fatigue, regulators, employers and employees need to gain an understanding of its causes and consequences.

NIOSH Backgrounder on Distracted Driving: Work-related Hazards and Resources for Safety
NIOSH Update (October 5, 2010)
Distracted driving is a danger under any circumstances. When someone is behind the wheel while on the job, distracted driving becomes an occupational hazard.

Occupational Road Safety Worldwide: Lessons for Research, Policy and Practice
In 2009, NIOSH and partners hosted the first International Conference on Road Safety at Work. Key themes were the importance of making a “business case” for managing road safety in the workplace, adopting a “systems” approach, and collecting better data to help policy makers and employers improve prevention programs.

Accelerated Evaluation of Automated Vehicles Safety in Lane-Change Scenarios
IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Transportation Systems July 2016 [Epub ahead of print]
Using data from naturalistic-field operational tests of prototype automated vehicles on public roads, this study developed improved techniques for evaluating the testing and validation of automated vehicles.

Trucker sleep patterns influence safety-critical events.
Atlas of Science July 2016: 1-2
Fatigued or drowsy driving is widely recognized as a contributor to fatal crashes involving large trucks. A study done by NIOSH in collaboration with the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute examined sleep patterns of 96 commercial truck drivers during their non-work periods and evaluated the influence of these sleep patterns on subsequent truck-driving performance during work periods. Study results show the importance of drivers receiving adequate sleep the night prior to their driving and underscore the importance of providing drivers with sufficient sleep opportunities.

The influence of daily sleep patterns of commercial truck drivers on driving performance.
Accident Analysis and Prevention 2016 / 91: 55-63
Fatigued or drowsy driving is widely recognized as a contributor to fatal crashes involving large trucks. A study done by NIOSH in collaboration with the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute examined sleep patterns of 96 commercial truck drivers during their non-work periods and evaluated the influence of these sleep patterns on subsequent truck-driving performance during work periods. Study results show the importance of drivers’ receiving adequate sleep the night prior to their driving and underscore the importance of providing drivers with sufficient sleep opportunities.

National survey of U.S. long-haul truck drivers: Injury and safety.
Accident Analysis and Prevention 2015 / 85: 66-72
NIOSH conducted personal interviews with a nationally representative sample of 1,265 LHTDs at 32 truck stops across the U.S. in 2010.The results of this first national survey of LHTDs highlight critical safety issues that warrant further investigation and interventions to keep truck drivers and others on the road safe.

Anthropometric Study of U.S. Truck Drivers: Methods, Summary Statistics, and Multivariate Accommodation Models
NIOSH Publication No. 2015-116

Seat belt use among long-haul truck drivers — United States, 2010
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report: March 6, 2015 / 64(8);217-221.
This study reported that about 14% of long-haul truck drivers are at increased risk for injury and death because they do not use a seat belt on every trip. Safety programs and other management interventions, engineering changes, and design changes are recommended as strategies to increase seat belt use among LHTDs.

Quick Sleep Tips for Truck Drivers
NIOSH Publication No. 2014-150
Driving a truck is a very demanding job. Lack of sleep makes it more difficult to meet the demands of the job and increases the risk for drowsy driving and vehicle crashes. This brochure provides truck drivers with quick tips for how to prepare for better sleep.

Obesity and other risk factors: the National Survey of U.S. Long-Haul Truck Driver Health and Injury
American Journal of Industrial Medicine: January 2014 [Epub ahead of print]
This national survey found that obesity (69% vs. 31%) and current smoking (51% vs 19%) were twice as prevalent in long-haul truck drivers as in the 2010 U.S adult working population.

U.S. truck driver anthropometric study and multivariate anthropometric models for cab designs
Human Factors: October 2012 / 54(5):849-871
This study presents updated information on body dimensions of a nationally representative sample of the U.S. truck driver population. It reports that both male and female drivers are about 30 pounds heavier than persons of the same age in the general population. This research will help manufacturers build safer truck cabs that are a better fit for today’s drivers.

NIOSH Fatal Occupational Injury Cost Fact Sheet: Truck Transportation
NIOSH Publication No. 2012-135

The Influence of Heavy Truck Egress Tactics on Ground Reaction Force
NIOSH Publication No. 2012-103, November 2011 / :192-195
How truck drivers enter or leave their cabs affects their risk for slips and falls, which are an important cause of injury. Truck drivers are trained to enter and exit their trucks using inward-facing tactics, but some drivers choose to do otherwise. This study found that drivers with high BMIs used inward-facing tactics more frequently than other drivers. It recommends inward-facing tactics since lower ground reaction forces are associated with reduced stresses on tissues.

A story of impact: Improved safety for truck drivers: designing safer cabs based on driver body dimensions
NIOSH Publication No. 2011-188

Mortality among members of a truck driver trade association
AAOHN Journal: November 2010 / 58(11):473-480
This study analyzed cause of death for a group of truck drivers, 69% of whom were owner-operators. The authors analyzed 26 major disease classifications and 92 specific causes of death. The only cause of death that was significantly more common for truck drivers than in the general population was transportation accidents.

Commercial Drivers’ Health: A Naturalistic Study of Body Mass Index, Fatigue, and Involvement in Safety-critical Eventsexternal icon
Traffic Injury Prevention: December 2009 / 10(6):573-579
This study links obesity to driver fatigue and to the likelihood of involvement in a safety-critical event.

Anthropometric changes among U.S. truck drivers
Proceedings of the 17th World Congress on Ergonomics (IEA2009), Beijing, China, August 9-14, 2009. Madison, WI: International Ergonomics Association, 2009 Aug:1-4.

Impact of federal compliance reviews of trucking companies in reducing highway truck crashes
Accident Analysis & Prevention: January 2008 / 40(1):238-245

Proceedings of Truck Driver Occupational Safety and Health Conference
NIOSH Publication No. 2007-120
In April 2003, an international group of researchers convened in Detroit to discuss the occupational safety and health of commercial motor vehicle drivers. This conference was unusual because it focused on driver well-being, rather than general highway safety and transportation issues. The report provides a selective review of the relevant literature, summarizes the conference presentations, incorporates the comments made by many of the participants, and outlines some topics needing further research.

Officer Road Code Toolkit
NIOSH Publication No. 2019-100
It’s important to promote motor vehicle safety among patrol officers so they can stay safe while working to make communities safer. This toolkit is designed to promote safe driving practices within an agency so that patrol officers operate by a unified code behind the wheel: Drive to Arrive Alive.

Keep Officers Safe on the Road Infographicpdf icon
Motor vehicle-related incidents are the leading cause of on-the-job deaths for law enforcement officers in the U.S. This infographic provides key stats and recommends ways that officers can prevent crashes and injuries.

Fact Sheet: Emergency Medical Services Workers: How Employers Can Prevent Injuries and Exposures
NIOSH Publication No. 2017-194
This fact sheet provides results from a four-year study capturing data from EMS workers treated in emergency departments and gives employers recommendations for preventing injuries and exposures among workers.

Law Enforcement Officer Motor Vehicle Crash and Struck-by Fatality Investigations: A Pilot Program
NIOSH Publication No. 2017-121
The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health’s (NIOSH) Law Enforcement Officer (LEO) Motor Vehicle Crash and Struck-by Fatality Investigations Pilot Program is a research program that investigates LEO line-of-duty deaths due to motor vehicle events. This flyer provides information about the program’s investigations and reports.

Dataset: Anthropometric Database for the EMTs in the United States
NIOSH Dataset RB-1008-2016-0

Sergeant Struck by a Motor Vehicle on Interstate Highway – New Mexico
NIOSH LEO 2014-01, January 2016 / :1-19
Sheriff’s office sergeant was fatally injured when he was struck by a motorist while investigating several motor vehicle crashes on an interstate highway.

Seat and seatbelt accommodation in fire apparatus: anthropometric aspects
Applied Ergonomics: November 2015 / 51:137-151
This study provides data that may reduce impediments to the easy use of seat belts by fire service personnel. Vehicle design engineers and fire departments can use these data to better match vehicles and equipment to the physical needs of the fire fighters who use them.

Characteristics of officer-involved vehicle collisions in California
Policing: July-September 2015 / 38(3):458-477
The purpose of this paper is to examine the situational and individual officer characteristics of officer-involved vehicle collisions that result in fatality, injury, and non-injury outcomes.

Law enforcement officers’ risk perceptions toward on-duty motor-vehicle events
Policing: July-September 2015 / 38(3):
Motor-vehicle related events (MVEs) are the leading cause of on-duty death for law enforcement officers, yet little is known about how officers view this significant job hazard. This paper explores officers’ motor-vehicle risk perception and examines how prior on-duty MVEs and the death or injury of a fellow officer influences this perception.

Research in brief: motor vehicle safety for law enforcement officers – still a priority
Police Chief: April 2015 / LXXXII(4):22-23
Between 2013 and 2014, the number of officers who died in the line of duty increased by 24 percent. In 2014, 50 officers were killed in firearm incidents, and 49 died due to motor vehicle events. In the last decade, one officer a week, on average, has been killed on U.S. roads (2005-2014 = 61.9 deaths annually). Even though motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of job-related deaths among law enforcement officers, data on motor vehicle injury and crash trends are scant. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) embarked on a comprehensive statewide study of motor vehicle safety among law enforcement officers to better understand these issues. The study was conducted in one state (Iowa); however, the results and recommendations are useful to law enforcement leaders across the United States.

Take Charge of Your Safety in and Around Your Patrol Vehicle
NIOSH Publication No. 2015-109
This flyer tells law enforcement officers five simple things they can do to reduce their risk of a motor vehicle crash while on duty.

Law Enforcement Officer Motor Vehicle Safety: Findings from a Statewide Survey
NIOSH Publication No. 2015-101
This document reports results and recommendations from a survey of law enforcement officers in Iowa. Officers responded to questions about their attitudes and behaviors related to motor vehicle safety on the job, their crash experience, and departmental policies and training.

SAE Surface Vehicle Recommended Practice J2956 for Occupant Restraint and Equipment Mounting Integrity – Side Impact System-Level Ambulance Patient Compartmentexternal icon
SAE (2011)
This SAE Recommended Practice describes the test procedures for conducting side impact occupant restraint and equipment mounting integrity tests for ambulance patient compartments. It describes crash pulse characteristics and recommends test procedures to standardize restraint system and equipment mounting testing for ambulances. Descriptions of the test set-up, test instrumentation, photographic/video coverage, and the test fixtures are included.

A story of impact: NIOSH continues research to improve safety for ambulance service workers and EMS responders
NIOSH Publication No. 2011-190

Preventing Deaths and Injuries of Fire Fighters Operating Modified Excess/Surplus Vehicles
NIOSH Publication No. 2011-125
Fire fighters may be at risk for crash-related injuries while operating excess and other surplus vehicles that have been modified for fire service use. NIOSH urges fire departments to take precautions and actions to minimize the hazards and risks to fire fighters when using modified excess/surplus vehicles.

A story of impact: NIOSH research leads to a reduction in safety hazards among ambulance service workers and EMS responders
NIOSH Publication No. 2010-164

Assessing the performance of various restraints on ambulance patient compartment workers during crash events
International Journal of Crashworthiness: October 2010 / 15(5):517-541
The inability of emergency medical service (EMS) workers to remain safely restrained while treating patients in the patient compartment of a moving ambulance has been identified as a key safety risk for EMS workers in North America. Results indicate that the restraint systems offering mobility have the potential to improve worker safety in this unique work environment.

SAE (2010). SAE Surface Vehicle Recommended Practice J2917 for Occupant Restraint and Equipment Mounting Integrity – Frontal Impact System-Level Ambulance Patient Compartmentexternal icon
This SAE Recommended Practice describes the test procedures for conducting frontal impact occupant restraint and equipment mounting integrity tests for ambulance patient compartment applications. These procedures are intended to standardize the testing of restraint systems and equipment mounts in ambulances. Descriptions of the test set-up, test instrumentation, photographic/video coverage, and the test fixtures are included.

Eleven years of occupational mortality in law enforcement: the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries, 1992-2002
American Journal of Industrial Medicine: September 2010 / 53(9):940-949
This study compares and describes intentional and transport-related fatality rates among US law enforcement officers (LEOs) over an 11-year period. It found that transportation-related deaths were nearly as common as homicide as a cause of occupational injuries and deaths for LEOs.

Reducing firefighter vehicle crash fatalities
Fire Engineering: June 2009 / 162(6):79-84
Although on-duty firefighter fatalities in structure fires have declined in the past 30 years, deaths from motor vehicle crashes have stayed about the same. This article suggests that firefighter deaths in motor vehicle incidents could be reduced by enforcing the use of seatbelts at all times, providing additional training to drivers, wearing appropriate safety equipment, and monitoring compliance with safety rules.

Crash testing of ambulance chassis cab vehicles
SAE 2007 Transactions Journal of Commercial Vehicles. Warrendale, PA: SAE International, 2008 Apr;1-19.
NIOSH and partners conducted a test program to evaluate the capability of mobile restraint systems to protect occupants in the patient compartment of an ambulance. This paper focuses on the test results related to vehicle chassis behavior and acceleration pulses.

National Truck Equipment Association, Ambulance Manufacturers Division Standard 025external icon
This standard establishes the requirements for measuring the minimum acceptable dimension for an occupant workspace inside an ambulance.

Improving work zone safety: recommendations based on a NIOSH fatality investigation
Professional Safety 2008 Apr; 53(4):46-48
Workers in highway work zones are exposed to risk of injury from the movement of construction vehicles and equipment within the work zones, as well as from passing motor vehicle traffic. This article highlights the events leading to the death of a laborer working in a residential roadway construction work zone in North Carolina.

Construction Equipment Visibility
This web page offers detailed diagrams to assist in visualizing the areas around various construction vehicles and equipment that are unable to be seen from the operator’s position.

Building Safer Highway Work Zones: Measures to Prevent Worker Injuries from Vehicles and Equipment
NIOSH Publication No. 2001-128
Best practices for preventing worker injuries and fatalities in highway work zones due to motor vehicles and construction equipment. Includes one-page case studies suitable for use in toolbox safety talks or safety management classes.

Through the Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) Program, NIOSH conducts on-site investigations of occupational fatalities, including those related to motor vehicles, and supports similar efforts by State partners. NIOSH also investigates vehicle-related fatalities of fire fighters through the Fire Fighter Fatality Investigation and Prevention Program. The case summaries from FACE reports can be used by employers in safety meetings and “toolbox talks.”

Fact Sheet: Work-Related Motor Vehicle Crashes: Preventing Injuries to Young Drivers: What Employers Should Know
NIOSH Publication No. 2013-153
This fact sheet will help employers be more aware of the risk of motor vehicle crashes among younger workers. It gives information about Federal and state laws that cover workplace driving and offers recommendations to employers for preventing motor vehicle crashes among younger workers.

Fact Sheet: Work-Related Motor Vehicle Crashes: Preventing Injuries to Young Drivers: What Parents Should Know
NIOSH Publication No. 2013-152
If you are a parent of a teen or young adult who drives as part of his or her job, it is important that you understand the risk for motor vehicle crashes at work. This fact sheet gives information about Federal and state laws that cover workplace driving and offers recommendations for you and your son or daughter for preventing motor vehicle crashes among younger workers.

Fact Sheet: Older Drivers in the Workplace: Crash Prevention for Employers and Workers
NIOSH Publication No. 2005-159
This fact sheet provides safety recommendations for older drivers and their employers.
En español

A comparison of crash patterns in heavy trucks with and without collision warning system technology
SAE 2004 Transactions Journal of Commercial Vehicles: July 2005 / 113(2):360-365)

NIOSH Update: Medical Interns™ Risk for Car Crashes Linked With Extended Shifts in NIOSH-Funded Study
NIOSH Update (January 13, 2005)

NIOSH Update: Requiring Safety Belt Use is Key Employer Policy for Preventing Job Vehicle Deaths, NIOSH Says
NIOSH Update (September 14, 2004)

NIOSH Update: NIOSH Recommends Ways to Prevent Fatalities from Work-Related Roadway Crashes
NIOSH Update (April 7, 2004)

Fact Sheet: Work-Related Roadway Crashes: Who’s at Risk?NIOSH Publication No. 2004-137
A quick reference for statistics on fatal work-related crashes in the U.S.
En español

Fact Sheet: Work-Related Roadway Crashes: Prevention Strategies for Employers
NIOSH Publication No. 2004-136
This fact sheet contains general recommendations for employers on crash prevention and vehicle safety programs.
En español

NIOSH Update: NIOSH, OSHA, Roadway Work Zone Safety and Health Coalition Ally to Improve Roadway Work Zone Safety
NIOSH Update (November 26, 2003)

NIOSH Update: Ways to Prevent Job-Related Roadway Deaths, Critical Research Areas Identified by NIOSH
NIOSH Update (November 6, 2003)

NIOSH Hazard Review: Work-Related Roadway Crashes: Challenges and Opportunities for Prevention
NIOSH Publication No. 2003-119
This is a comprehensive review of safety issues for workers who operate motor vehicles on the job. It identifies groups of workers at greatest risk for traffic crashes, summarizes key issues that contribute to work-related roadway crashes, and recommends preventive measures for employers and other stakeholders.

Ambulance Crash-Related Injuries Among Emergency Medical Services Workers – United States, 1991-2002
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report: February 28, 2003 / 52(8): 154-156
EMS workers are most at risk when transporting patients, or responding to or returning from emergency calls. This report highlights the risk of death or serious injury for EMS workers riding in ambulances.

Your Safety First: Railroad Crossing Safety for Emergency Responders
NIOSH Publication No. 2003-121
Reports fatalities of emergency responders struck and killed by trains at railroad grade crossings. Discusses safe driving at rail crossings, awareness of signs and warning devices, and how to react if a vehicle stalls on the tracks. Developed by NIOSH in cooperation with the Federal Railroad Administration and Operation Lifesaver, Inc.

Hazard ID: Fire Fighter Deaths from Tanker Truck Rollovers
NIOSH Publication No. 2002-111
Offers safety recommendations to increase awareness of this hazard among the fire service, focusing on the need for fire departments to train drivers about the operating characteristics of tanker trucks and to ensure that tankers are properly designed and equipped.
En español

Hazard ID: Traffic Hazards to Fire Fighters While Working Along Roadways
NIOSH Publication No. 2001-143
Provides case studies and recommendations, emphasizing the importance of pre-incident planning, standard operating procedures, and training to protect responder safety at incident sites.
En español

Page last reviewed: January 26, 2018