Core Indicators for Monitoring the Ending the HIV Epidemic Initiative (Preliminary Data):

HIV Surveillance Data Tables

Core Indicators for Monitoring the Ending the HIV Epidemic Initiative (Preliminary Data) :

HIV Diagnoses and Linkage to HIV Medical Care, 2019 and 2020 (Reported through June 2020)

This issue of HIV Surveillance Data Tables is published by the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention (DHAP), National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, Georgia.

Data are presented for diagnoses of HIV infection reported to CDC through June 2020.

HIV Surveillance Data Tables is not copyrighted and may be used and copied without permission. Citation of the source is, however, appreciated.

Suggested Citation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Core indicators for monitoring the Ending the HIV Epidemic initiative : HIV diagnoses and linkage to HIV medical care, 2019 and 2020 (preliminary data reported through June 2020). HIV Surveillance Data Tables 2020;1(No. 6) http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/library/reports/surveillance-data-tables/vol-1-no-6/index.html. Published October 2020. Accessed [date].

Download the full report pdf icon[PDF – 866 KB].

The Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America (EHE) initiative will leverage critical scientific advances in HIV prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and outbreak response [1]. The goal of the initiative is to reduce new HIV infections by 75% in 5 years and by at least 90% in 10 years. Throughout the initiative, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will routinely release HIV Surveillance Data Tables on the 6 core indicators for EHE to allow for more timely monitoring of progress. The full list of EHE core indicators and their definitions can be found in the Technical Notes of the Core Indicators for Monitoring the Ending the HIV Epidemic Initiative report at https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/library/reports/surveillance-data-tables/vol-1-no-1/index.html.

The tables included in this report provide preliminary data on HIV diagnoses and linkage to HIV medical care reported to CDC as of June 2020 for the years 2019 and 2020. Data for both indicators are provided at the national-, state-, and county-levels (EHE Phase I jurisdictions only). See Tabulation and Presentation of Data for details on how the indicators are calculated. Data reported to the National HIV Surveillance System (NHSS) are considered preliminary until a 12-month reporting lag has been reached. Because the data in this report are provided by using an NHSS dataset produced prior to reaching a 12-month reporting lag, the data should be interpreted with caution. In addition to being preliminary, data for the year 2020 should be interpreted with caution due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV case surveillance activities in state/local jurisdictions [2].

Tabulation and Presentation of Data

Diagnosis of HIV Infection

Diagnoses of HIV infection are the numbers of persons aged ≥13 years whose HIV infection was diagnosed during January 2019 through June 2020 (Tables 1a–d).

Data presented were reported (after the removal of personally identifiable information) to CDC’s NHSS through June 2020. Please use caution when inter­preting data on diagnoses of HIV infection. HIV surveil­lance reports may not be representative of all per­sons with HIV because not all infected persons have been (1) tested or (2) tested at a time when the infection could be detected and diagnosed. Also, some states offer anonymous HIV testing; the results of anonymous tests are not reported to the confidential, name-based HIV registries of state and local health departments. Therefore, reports of confidential test results may not repre­sent all persons who tested positive for HIV infection.

Data reported to NHSS are considered preliminary until a 12-month reporting lag has been reached and should be interpreted with caution.  In addition to being preliminary, data for the year 2020 should be interpreted with caution due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV case surveillance activities in state and local jurisdictions.

More information on counting diagnoses of HIV infection can be found at https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/library/reports/hiv-surveillance/vol-31/index.html (HIV Surveillance Report, 2018 [Updated]).

Linkage to HIV Medical Care

Linkage to HIV medical care within 1 month of HIV diagnosis is measured for persons aged ≥13 years whose HIV infection was diagnosed during January 2019 through March 2020, and who resided in any of the jurisdictions (including EHE Phase I jurisdictions) with complete reporting of laboratory data to CDC at the time of diagnosis (Tables 2a–c). The numerator is the number of persons aged ≥ 13 years whose HIV infection was diagnosed during the specified year and who had ≥1 CD4 or viral load (VL) test within 1 month of HIV diagnosis. The denominator is the number of persons aged ≥13 years whose HIV infection was diagnosed during the specified year. Reporting of linkage to HIV medical care data requires a minimum 3-month reporting lag to account for delays in reporting of laboratory results to NHSS; therefore, data for the year 2020 on linkage to HIV medical care in these surveillance tables are for persons with HIV diagnosed during January through March of 2020 and that were reported to NHSS through June 2020. Data are not provided for states and associated jurisdictions that do not have laws requiring reporting of all CD4 and viral loads, or that have incomplete reporting of laboratory data to CDC. Areas without laws: Idaho, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Areas with incomplete reporting: Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Kansas, Kentucky, Vermont, and Puerto Rico.

Data reported to NHSS are considered preliminary until a 12-month reporting lag has been reached and should be interpreted with caution.  In addition to being preliminary, data for the year 2020 should be interpreted with caution due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV case surveillance activities in state and local jurisdictions.

More information on calculating linkage to care can be found at Monitoring selected national HIV prevention and care objectives by using HIV surveillance data—United States and 6 dependent areas, 2018. pdf icon[PDF – 4 MB]

References

  1. HHS. What is ‘Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America’ https://www.hiv.gov/federal-response/ending-the-hiv-epidemic/overviewexternal icon. Published October 4, 2019. Accessed July 13, 2020.
  2. CDC [Schuchat A, CDC COVID-19 Response Team]. Public Health Response to the Initiation and Spread of Pandemic COVID-19 in the United States, February 24–April 21, 2020. MMWR 2020;69(18):551–556. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6918e2external icon

Suggested Citation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Core indicators for monitoring the Ending the HIV Epidemic initiative : HIV diagnoses and linkage to HIV medical care, 2019 and 2020 (preliminary data reported through June 2020). HIV Surveillance Data Tables 2020;1(No. 6) http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/library/reports/surveillance-data-tables/vol-1-no-6/index.html. Published October 2020. Accessed [date].

Acknowledgments

Publication of HIV Surveillance Data Tables was made possible by the contributions of the state and territorial health departments and the HIV surveillance programs that provided surveillance data to CDC.

HIV Surveillance Data Tables was prepared by the following staff and contractors of the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, CDC: Anna Satcher Johnson, Zanetta Gant, Xiaohong Hu, Jianmin Li, Baohua Wu, Chan Jin, Shihua Wang, Chenchen Yu, Irene Hall, Norma Harris, Michael Friend and the Web and Consumer Services Team of the Prevention Communications Branch (editing and desktop publishing).

Table 1a. Diagnoses of HIV infection among adults aged 50 years and older, by year of diagnosis and selected characteristics, 2014–2018—United States
2019 2020 (January – June)
Total No. Total No.
Gender
Male 28,217 8,292
Female 6,721 1,946
Transgender male-to-femalea 575 164
Transgender female-to-malea 41 8
Additional gender identityb 20 4
Age at diagnosis (yr)
13–24 7,384 2,063
25–34 12,788 3,797
35–44 6,935 1,995
45–54 4,764 1,437
≥55 3,703 1,122
Race/ethnicity
American Indian/Alaska Native 210 58
Asian 731 210
Black/African American 15,375 4,710
Hispanic/Latinoc 9,384 2,528
Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander 68 23
White 9,028 2,752
Multiple races 778 133
Transmission categoryd
Male-to-male sexual contact 23,574 7,017
Injection drug use
      Male 1,349 411
      Female 1,079 288
Male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use 1,314 339
Heterosexual contacte
      Male 2,538 683
      Female 5,656 1,653
Otherf
      Male 34 10
      Female 31 14
Region of residenceg
Northeast 5,257 1,243
Midwest 4,745 1,447
South 18,516 5,797
West 7,056 1,927
Total 35,574 10,414

Abbreviations: CDC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [footnotes only].
Note. Data are for cases reported to CDC through June 2020, are considered preliminary until a 12-month reporting lag has been reached, and should be interpreted with caution. In addition to being preliminary, data for the year 2020 should be interpreted with caution due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV case surveillance activities in state/local jurisdictions.

a Transgender male-to-female” includes individuals who were assigned “male” sex at birth but have ever identified as “female” gender. “Transgender female-to-male” includes individuals who were assigned “female” sex at birth but have ever identified as “male” gender.
b Additional gender identity examples include “bigender,” “gender queer,” and “two-spirit.”
c Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
dData have been statistically adjusted to account for missing transmission category, therefore values may not sum to column subtotals and total. Data presented based on sex at birth and may include transgender persons.
eHeterosexual contact with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection
fIncludes hemophilia, blood transfusion, perinatal exposure, and risk factor not reported or not identified.
g Data are based on residence at time of diagnosis of HIV infection.

Table 1b. Diagnoses of HIV infection among persons aged ≥13 years, by selected characteristics, January 2019 through June 2020—United States and 6 dependent areas (preliminary)
2019 2020 (January – June)
Total No. Total No.
Gender
Male 28,530 8,353
Female 6,796 1,953
Transgender male-to-femalea 577 165
Transgender female-to-malea 41 8
Additional gender identityb 20 4
Age at diagnosis (yr)
13–24 7,442 2,075
25–34 12,894 3,821
35–44 7,011 2,006
45–54 4,830 1,447
≥55 3,787 1,134
Race/ethnicity
American Indian/Alaska Native 210 58
Asian 737 210
Black/African American 15,380 4,710
Hispanic/Latinoc 9,752 2,596
Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander 72 23
White 9,034 2,753
Multiple races 779 133
Transmission categoryd
Male-to-male sexual contact 23,789 7,062
Injection drug use
      Male 1,377 419
      Female 1,084 288
Male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use 1,325 341
Heterosexual contacte
      Male 2,599 690
      Female 5,726 1,659
Otherf
      Male 34 10
      Female 31 14
Region of residenceg
Northeast 5,257 1,243
Midwest 4,745 1,447
South 18,516 5,797
West 7,056 1,927
U.S. dependent areas 390 69
Total 35,964 10,483

Abbreviations: CDC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [footnotes only].
Note. Data are for cases reported to CDC through June 2020, are considered preliminary until a 12-month reporting lag has been reached, and should be interpreted with caution. In addition to being preliminary, data for the year 2020 should be interpreted with caution due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV case surveillance activities in state/local jurisdictions.

a “Transgender male-to-female” includes individuals who were assigned “male” sex at birth but have ever identified as “female” gender. “Transgender female-to-male” includes individuals who were assigned “female” sex at birth but have ever identified as “male” gender.
b Additional gender identity examples include “bigender,” “gender queer,” and “two-spirit.”
c Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
dData have been statistically adjusted to account for missing transmission category, therefore values may not sum to column subtotals and total. Data presented based on sex at birth and may include transgender persons.
eHeterosexual contact with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection
fIncludes hemophilia, blood transfusion, perinatal exposure, and risk factor not reported or not identified.
g Data are based on residence at time of diagnosis of HIV infection.

Table 1c. Diagnoses of HIV infection among persons aged ≥13 years, by area of residence, January 2019 through June 2020—United States and 6 dependent areas (preliminary)
2019 2020 (January – June)
Area of residence Total No. Total No.
Alabama 596 221
Alaska 27 15
Arizona 766 290
Arkansas 284 120
California 4,198 1,061
Colorado 459 117
Connecticut 212 40
Delaware 92 48
District of Columbia 249 62
Florida 4,405 1,648
Georgia 2,291 524
Hawaii 63 12
Idaho 27 1
Illinois 1,257 290
Indiana 490 178
Iowa 100 35
Kansas 132 38
Kentucky 268 57
Louisiana 889 331
Maine 29 4
Maryland 917 277
Massachusetts 521 95
Michigan 675 213
Minnesota 273 100
Mississippi 460 172
Missouri 487 168
Montana 25 3
Nebraska 81 26
Nevada 509 85
New Hampshire 31 11
New Jersey 1,029 140
New Mexico 147 31
New York 2,340 659
North Carolina 1,376 499
North Dakota 36 9
Ohio 972 302
Oklahoma 243 62
Oregon 198 69
Pennsylvania 1,010 276
Rhode Island 74 12
South Carolina 702 282
South Dakota 34 8
Tennessee 776 284
Texas 4,002 882
Utah 135 48
Vermont 11 6
Virginia 822 281
Washington 489 191
West Virginia 144 47
Wisconsin 208 80
Wyoming 13 4
Subtotal 35,574 10,414
U.S. dependent areas
American Samoa 0 0
Guam 10 0
Northern Mariana Islands 2 0
Puerto Rico 372 69
Republic of Palau 0 0
U.S. Virgin Islands 6 0
Subtotal 390 69
Total 35,964 10,483

Abbreviations: CDC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [footnotes only].
Note. Data are based on residence at time of diagnosis of HIV infection. Data are for cases reported to CDC through June 2020, are considered preliminary until a 12-month reporting lag has been reached, and should be interpreted with caution. In addition to being preliminary, data for the year 2020 should be interpreted with caution due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV case surveillance activities in state/local jurisdictions.

Table 1d. Diagnoses of HIV infection among persons aged ≥13 years, by area of residence, January 2019 through June 2020—Ending the HIV Epidemic Phase I jurisdictions (preliminary)
2019 2020 (January – June)
Area of residence Total No. Total No.
Arizona
Maricopa County 525 196
California
Alameda County 223 73
Los Angeles County 1,409 373
Orange County 246 104
Riverside County 262 61
Sacramento County 84 3
San Bernardino County 273 33
San Diego County 361 66
San Francisco County 207 62
District of Columbia 249 62
Florida
Broward County 598 218
Duval County 272 98
Hillsborough County 267 136
Miami-Dade County 1,158 378
Orange County 471 183
Palm Beach County 237 102
Pinellas County 187 83
Georgia
Cobb County 170 27
DeKalb County 327 64
Fulton County 565 145
Gwinnett County 194 32
Illinois
Cook County 893 213
Indiana
Marion County 209 70
Louisiana
East Baton Rouge Parish 152 63
Orleans Parish 159 42
Maryland
Baltimore City 192 64
Montgomery County 141 37
Prince George’s County 271 77
Massachusetts
Suffolk County 134 31
Michigan
Wayne County 285 99
Nevada
Clark County 448 64
New Jersey
Essex County 224 43
Hudson County 148 18
New York
Bronx County 500 119
Kings County 474 160
New York County 343 103
Queens County 356 109
North Carolina
Mecklenburg County 268 82
Ohio
Cuyahoga County 158 59
Franklin County 217 79
Hamilton County 171 41
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia County 431 112
Tennessee
Shelby County 262 108
Texas
Bexar County 356 112
Dallas County 738 257
Harris County 1,100 120
Tarrant County 292 78
Travis County 180 58
Washington
King County 252 106
Puerto Rico
San Juan Municipio 85 13

Abbreviations: CDC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [footnotes only].
Note. Data are based on residence at time of diagnosis of HIV infection. Data are for cases reported to CDC through June 2020, are considered preliminary until a 12-month reporting lag has been reached, and should be interpreted with caution. In addition to being preliminary, data for the year 2020 should be interpreted with caution due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV case surveillance activities in state/local jurisdictions.

Table 2a. Linkage to HIV medical care within 1 month after HIV diagnosis during January 2019 through March 2020 among persons aged ≥13 years, by selected characteristics—41 states and the District of Columbia (preliminary)
2019 2020 (January – March)
Total diagnoses ≥1 CD4 or VL tests No CD4 or VL test Total diagnoses ≥1 CD4 or VL tests No CD4 or VL test
No. No. % No. % No. No. % No. %
Gender
Male 25,292 20,727 82.0 4,565 18.0 5,370 4,349 81.0 1,021 19.0
Female 5,966 4,783 80.2 1,183 19.8 1,224 998 81.5 226 18.5
Transgender male-to-femalea 523 434 83.0 89 17.0 106 88 83.0 18 17.0
Transgender female-to-malea 36 31 86.1 5 13.9 4 4 100 0 0.0
Additional gender identityb 18 16 88.9 2 11.1 3 3 100 0 0.0
Age at diagnosis (yr)
13–24 6,618 5,264 79.5 1,354 20.5 1,318 1,024 77.7 294 22.3
25–34 11,471 9,303 81.1 2,168 18.9 2,441 1,987 81.4 454 18.6
35–44 6,213 5,134 82.6 1,079 17.4 1,326 1,076 81.1 250 18.9
45–54 4,246 3,542 83.4 704 16.6 922 760 82.4 162 17.6
≥55 3,287 2,748 83.6 539 16.4 700 595 85.0 105 15.0
Race/ethnicity
American Indian/Alaska Native 167 140 83.8 27 16.2 34 29 85.3 5 14.7
Asian 661 548 82.9 113 17.1 140 121 86.4 19 13.6
Black/African American 14,005 11,060 79.0 2,945 21.0 3,080 2,432 79.0 648 21.0
Hispanic/Latinoc 8,380 7,080 84.5 1,300 15.5 1,636 1,352 82.6 284 17.4
Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander 64 52 81.3 12 18.8 14 11 78.6 3 21.4
White 7,849 6,518 83.0 1,331 17.0 1,707 1,416 83.0 291 17.0
Multiple races 709 593 83.6 116 16.4 96 81 84.4 15 15.6
Transmission categoryd
Male-to-male sexual contact 21,288 17,558 82.5 3,729 17.5 4,556 3,694 81.1 862 18.9
Injection drug use
      Male 1,108 854 77.1 253 22.9 256 199 77.5 58 22.5
      Female 927 702 75.7 225 24.3 181 147 80.9 35 19.1
Male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use 1,152 926 80.4 225 19.6 216 179 82.7 37 17.3
Heterosexual contacte
      Male 2,251 1,808 80.3 443 19.7 446 365 81.8 81 18.2
      Female 5,052 4,091 81.0 961 19.0 1,036 846 81.6 191 18.4
Totalf 31,835 25,991 81.6 5,844 18.4 6,707 5,442 81.1 1,265 18.9

Abbreviations: CD4, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (cells/µL) or percentage; VL, viral load (copies/mL). CDC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [footnotes only].
Note. Data are for cases reported to CDC through June 2020, are considered preliminary until a 12-month reporting lag has been reached, and should be interpreted with caution. In addition to being preliminary, data for the year 2020 should be interpreted with caution due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV case surveillance activities in state/local jurisdictions. Linkage to HIV medical care was measured by documentation of ≥1 CD4 or VL tests ≤1 month after HIV diagnosis. Reporting of linkage to HIV medical care data requires a 3-month reporting lag to account for delays in reporting of laboratory results to CDC; therefore, data for the year 2020 on linkage to HIV medical care are for persons with HIV diagnosed during January through March of 2020, that were reported to CDC through June 2020. Data not provided for jurisdictions that do not have laws requiring reporting of all CD4 and viral loads or for areas with incomplete reporting of laboratory data to CDC. Areas without laws: Idaho, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Areas with incomplete lab reporting: Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Kansas, Kentucky, Vermont, and Puerto Rico.

aTransgender male-to-female” includes individuals who were assigned “male” sex at birth but have ever identified as “female” gender. “Transgender female-to-male” includes individuals who were assigned “female” sex at birth but have ever identified as “male” gender.
bAdditional gender identity examples include “bigender,” “gender queer,” and “two-spirit.”
cHispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
dData have been statistically adjusted to account for missing transmission category, therefore values may not sum to column subtotals and total. Data presented based on sex at birth and include transgender persons.
eHeterosexual contact with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection.
fIncludes persons whose infection was attributed to hemophilia, blood transfusion, or perinatal exposure or whose risk factor was not reported or not identified. Data not displayed because the numbers were too small to be meaningful.

Table 2b. Linkage to HIV medical care within 1 month after HIV diagnosis during January 2019 through March 2020, among persons aged ≥13 years, by area of residence—41 states and the District of Columbia (preliminary)
2019 2020 (January – March)
Total diagnoses ≥1 CD4 or VL tests No CD4 or VL test Total diagnoses ≥1 CD4 or VL tests No CD4 or VL test
No. No. % No. % No. No. % No. %
Alabama 596 471 79.0 125 21.0 170 140 82.4 30 17.6
Alaska 27 23 85.2 4 14.8 9 9 100 0 0.0
California 4,198 3,474 82.8 724 17.2 844 737 87.3 107 12.7
Colorado 459 381 83.0 78 17.0 78 68 87.2 10 12.8
Delaware 92 71 77.2 21 22.8 36 27 75.0 9 25.0
District of Columbia 249 223 89.6 26 10.4 48 42 87.5 6 12.5
Florida 4,405 3,691 83.8 714 16.2  1,034 869 84.0 165 16.0
Georgia 2,291 1,903 83.1 388 16.9 388 335 86.3 53 13.7
Hawaii 63 54 85.7 9 14.3 9 8 88.9 1 11.1
Illinois 1,257 1,046 83.2 211 16.8 236 211 89.4 25 10.6
Indiana 490 305 62.2 185 37.8 116 79 68.1 37 31.9
Iowa 100 91 91.0 9 9.0 24 22 91.7 2 8.3
Louisiana 889 732 82.3 157 17.7 217 157 72.4 60 27.6
Maine 29 27 93.1 2 6.9 4 4 100 0 0.0
Maryland 917 805 87.8 112 12.2 191 177 92.7 14 7.3
Massachusetts 521 474 91.0 47 9.0 84 72 85.7 12 14.3
Michigan 675 570 84.4 105 15.6 146 115 78.8 31 21.2
Minnesota 273 251 91.9 22 8.1 67 59 88.1 8 11.9
Mississippi 460 327 71.1 133 28.9 117 85 72.6 32 27.4
Missouri 487 375 77.0 112 23.0 103 82 79.6 21 20.4
Montana 25 22 88.0 3 12.0 3 2 66.7 1 33.3
Nebraska 81 65 80.2 16 19.8 22 19 86.4 3 13.6
Nevada 509 424 83.3 85 16.7 74 60 81.1 14 18.9
New Hampshire 31 28 90.3 3 9.7 10 10 100 0 0.0
New Mexico 147 132 89.8 15 10.2 23 20 87.0 3 13.0
New York 2,340 2,036 87.0 304 13.0 528 470 89.0 58 11.0
North Carolina 1,376 1,086 78.9 290 21.1 299 246 82.3 53 17.7
North Dakota 36 33 91.7 3 8.3 9 8 88.9 1 11.1
Ohio 972 815 83.8 157 16.2 235 203 86.4 32 13.6
Oklahoma 243 174 71.6 69 28.4 43 33 76.7 10 23.3
Oregon 198 176 88.9 22 11.1 48 44 91.7 4 8.3
Rhode Island 74 65 87.8 9 12.2 11 8 72.7 3 27.3
South Carolina 702 613 87.3 89 12.7 196 180 91.8 16 8.2
South Dakota 34 27 79.4 7 20.6 7 6 85.7 1 14.3
Tennessee 776 534 68.8 242 31.2 190 132 69.5 58 30.5
Texas 4,002 2,971 74.2 1,031 25.8 649 345 53.2 304 46.8
Utah 135 105 77.8 30 22.2 36 18 50.0 18 50.0
Virginia 822 648 78.8 174 21.2 193 156 80.8 37 19.2
Washington 489 436 89.2 53 10.8 123 109 88.6 14 11.4
West Virginia 144 106 73.6 38 26.4 33 25 75.8 8 24.2
Wisconsin 208 188 90.4 20 9.6 50 47 94.0 3 6.0
Wyoming 13 13 100 0 0.0 4 3 75.0 1 25.0
Total 31,835 25,991 81.6 5,844 18.4 6,707 5,442 81.1 1,265 18.9

Abbreviations: CD4, CD4+ T -lymphocyte count (cells/µL) or percentage; VL, viral load (copies/mL). CDC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [footnotes only].

Note. Data are based on residence at diagnosis of HIV infection. Data are for cases reported to CDC through June 2020, are considered preliminary until a 12-month reporting lag has been reached, and should be interpreted with caution. In addition to being preliminary, data for the year 2020 should be interpreted with caution due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV case surveillance activities in state/local jurisdictions.
Linkage to HIV medical care was measured by documentation of ≥1 CD4 or VL tests ≤1 month after HIV diagnosis. Reporting of linkage to HIV medical care data requires a 3-month reporting lag to account for delays in reporting of laboratory results to CDC; therefore, data for the year 2020 on linkage to HIV medical care are for persons with HIV diagnosed during January through March of 2020, that were reported to CDC through June 2020. Data not provided for jurisdictions that do not have laws requiring reporting of all CD4 and viral loads or for areas with incomplete reporting of laboratory data to CDC. Areas without laws: Idaho, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Areas with incomplete lab reporting: Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Kansas, Kentucky, Vermont, and Puerto Rico.

Table 2c. Linkage to HIV medical care within 1 month after HIV diagnosis during January 2019 through March 2020, among persons aged ≥13 years, by area of residence—Ending the HIV Epidemic Phase I jurisdictions (preliminary)
2019 2020 (January – March)
Total diagnoses ≥1 CD4 or VL tests No CD4 or VL test Total diagnoses ≥1 CD4 or VL tests No CD4 or VL test
No. No. % No. % No. No. % No. %
California
Alameda County 223 199 89.2 24 10.8 49 43 87.8 6 12.2
Los Angeles County 1,409 1,134 80.5 275 19.5 287 246 85.7 41 14.3
Orange County 246 199 80.9 47 19.1 73 65 89.0 8 11.0
Riverside County 262 212 80.9 50 19.1 48 43 89.6 5 10.4
Sacramento County 84 75 89.3 9 10.7 2 2 100 0 0.0
San Bernardino County 273 201 73.6 72 26.4 29 23 79.3 6 20.7
San Diego County 361 309 85.6 52 14.4 64 59 92.2 5 7.8
San Francisco County 207 199 96.1 8 3.9 49 47 95.9 2 4.1
District of Columbia 249 223 89.6 26 10.4 48 42 87.5 6 12.5
Florida
Broward County 598 525 87.8 73 12.2 139 124 89.2 15 10.8
Duval County 272 209 76.8 63 23.2 65 53 81.5 12 18.5
Hillsborough County 267 229 85.8 38 14.2 75 64 85.3 11 14.7
Miami-Dade County 1,158 975 84.2 183 15.8 244 202 82.8 42 17.2
Orange County 471 372 79.0 99 21.0 108 93 86.1 15 13.9
Palm Beach County 237 188 79.3 49 20.7 76 62 81.6 14 18.4
Pinellas County 187 160 85.6 27 14.4 43 38 88.4 5 11.6
Georgia 
Cobb County 170 151 88.8 19 11.2 16 14 87.5 2 12.5
DeKalb County 327 272 83.2 55 16.8 47 44 93.6 3 6.4
Fulton County 565 479 84.8 86 15.2 115 97 84.3 18 15.7
Gwinnett County 194 166 85.6 28 14.4 26 20 76.9 6 23.1
Illinois 
Cook County 893 743 83.2 150 16.8 166 151 91.0 15 9.0
Indiana 
Marion County 209 110 52.6 99 47.4 48 32 66.7 16 33.3
Louisiana 
East Baton Rouge Parish 152 134 88.2 18 11.8 40 33 82.5 7 17.5
Orleans Parish 159 131 82.4 28 17.6 25 19 76.0 6 24.0
Maryland 
Baltimore City 192 166 86.5 26 13.5 43 39 90.7 4 9.3
Montgomery County 141 129 91.5 12 8.5 24 24 100 0 0.0
Prince George’s County 271 238 87.8 33 12.2 55 51 92.7 4 7.3
Massachusetts
Suffolk County 134 123 91.8 11 8.2 27 26 96.3 1 3.7
Michigan
Wayne County 285 244 85.6 41 14.4 73 57 78.1 16 21.9
Nevada
Clark County 448 369 82.4 79 17.6 62 49 79.0 13 21.0
New York
Bronx County 500 435 87.0 65 13.0 88 75 85.2 13 14.8
Kings County 474 402 84.8 72 15.2 135 117 86.7 18 13.3
New York County 343 303 88.3 40 11.7 76 66 86.8 10 13.2
Queens County 356 304 85.4 52 14.6 92 88 95.7 4 4.3
North Carolina
Mecklenburg County 268 208 77.6 60 22.4 44 36 81.8 8 18.2
Ohio
Cuyahoga County 158 141 89.2 17 10.8 47 42 89.4 5 10.6
Franklin County 217 197 90.8 20 9.2 58 50 86.2 8 13.8
Hamilton County 171 145 84.8 26 15.2 31 29 93.5 2 6.5
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia County 431 367 85.2 64 14.8 94 80 85.1 14 14.9
Tennessee
Shelby County 262 164 62.6 98 37.4 76 50 65.8 26 34.2
Texas
Bexar County 356 255 71.6 101 28.4 77 42 54.5 35 45.5
Dallas County 738 558 75.6 180 24.4 173 103 59.5 70 40.5
Harris County 1,100 803 73.0 297 27.0 91 48 52.7 43 47.3
Tarrant County 292 218 74.7 74 25.3 63 33 52.4 30 47.6
Travis County 180 154 85.6 26 14.4 41 21 51.2 20 48.8
Washington
King County 252 227 90.1 25 9.9 60 52 86.7 8 13.3

Abbreviations: CD4, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (cells/µL) or percentage; VL, viral load (copies/mL). CDC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [footnotes only].

Note. Data are based on residence at diagnosis of HIV infection. Data are for cases reported to CDC through June 2020, are considered preliminary until a 12-month reporting lag has been reached, and should be interpreted with caution. In addition to being preliminary, data for the year 2020 should be interpreted with caution due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV case surveillance activities in state/local jurisdictions.
Linkage to HIV medical care was measured by documentation of ≥1 CD4 or VL tests ≤1 month after HIV diagnosis. Reporting of linkage to HIV medical care data requires a 3-month reporting lag to account for delays in reporting of laboratory results to CDC; therefore, data for the year 2020 on linkage to HIV medical care are for persons with HIV diagnosed during January through March of 2020, that were reported to CDC through June 2020. Data not provided for jurisdictions that do not have laws requiring reporting of all CD4 and viral loads or for areas with incomplete reporting of laboratory data to CDC. Areas without laws: Idaho, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Areas with incomplete lab reporting: Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Kansas, Kentucky, Vermont, and Puerto Rico.