Core Indicators for Monitoring the Ending the HIV Epidemic Data Tables

Updated May 18, 2020

HIV Surveillance Data Tables

The early release tables provide National-, state-, and county-level (EHE Phase I jurisdictions only) data on the 6 core indicators that will be used to monitor the Ending the HIV Epidemic initiative. Data are provisional and will be updated in future releases.

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The Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America (EHE) initiative will leverage critical scientific advances in HIV prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and outbreak response [1]. The goal of the initiative is to reduce new HIV infections by 75% in 5 years, and by at least 90% in 10 years.

The included early release tables provide data on the core indicators that will be used to monitor the EHE initiative. Data are provisional and will be updated in future releases. National-, state-, and county-level (EHE Phase I jurisdictions only; see Table 7) data are provided for the 6 core indicators of the EHE initiative, which are the following:

  • New HIV infections: the estimated number of new HIV infections in a calendar year.
  • Knowledge of HIV status: the percentage of per­sons with HIV who have received a diagnosis.
  • HIV diagnoses: the number of HIV infections confirmed by laboratory or clinical evidence in a calendar year.
  • Linkage to HIV medical care: the percentage of persons who have received a diagnosis of HIV infection in a calendar year and were linked to HIV medical care within 1 month.
  • HIV viral suppression: the percentage of persons living with diagnosed HIV who have a suppressed viral load at the most recent test in a calendar year.
  • Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) coverage: the percentage of the estimated number of persons prescribed PrEP in a calendar year relative to the estimated number of persons with indications for PrEP in a calendar year.

Surveillance of HIV Infection

Data presented were reported (after the removal of personally identifiable information) to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) through December 31, 2019. Please use caution when inter­preting the following:

  • Data on diagnoses of HIV infection. HIV surveil­lance reports may not be representative of all per­sons with HIV because not all infected persons have been (1) tested or (2) tested at a time when the infection could be detected and diagnosed. Also, some states offer anonymous HIV testing; the results of anonymous tests are not reported to the confidential, name-based HIV registries of state and local health departments. Therefore, reports of confidential test results may not repre­sent all persons who tested positive for HIV infection.
  • Deaths and prevalence-based data (knowledge of status and HIV viral suppression). Data for the year 2018 are preliminary and based on deaths reported to CDC as of December 2019.
  • Numbers less than 12 and trends based on these numbers.

Tabulation and Presentation of Data

New HIV Infections

New HIV infections among persons aged ≥13 years are estimated using the first CD4+ T-lymphocyte (CD4) test result after HIV diagnosis and a CD4-depletion model indicating disease progression or duration after infection (Tables 1a–c).

More information on estimating new HIV infec­tions can be found at https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/library/reports/surveillance/cdc-hiv-surveillance-supplemental-report-vol-24-1.pdf ( pdf icon[PDF – 3 MB] Estimated HIV incidence and prevalence in the United States, 2010–2016).

HIV Prevalence and Diagnosed Infection

The Knowledge of HIV Status indicator is measured as the percentage of persons aged ≥13 years with diagnosed HIV infection (Tables 2a–c). For this mea­sure the numerator (data reported to CDC) is the num­ber of persons aged ≥13 years living with diagnosed HIV infection at the end of the year. The denominator, total HIV prevalence, is the estimated number of per­sons aged years living with HIV infection (diagnosed or undiagnosed) at the end of the year. Knowledge of status and prevalence data for the year 2018 are pre­liminary and based on death data reported to CDC as of December 2019. The following areas had incom­plete reporting of deaths for the year 2018, and preva­lence estimates should be interpreted with caution: Alabama, Oklahoma, and South Carolina. Estimates for areas without laws requiring reporting of labora­tory data, or with incomplete reporting of laboratory data to CDC, should also be interpreted with caution. Areas without laws: Idaho, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Areas with incomplete reporting: Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut (2018 only), Kansas, Kentucky, Nevada (2017 only), Vermont, and Puerto Rico.

More information on calculating HIV prevalence and percentage of persons with diagnosed HIV infection can be found at https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/library/reports/surveillance/cdc-hiv-surveillance-supplemental-report-vol-24-1.pdf ( pdf icon[PDF – 3 MB] Esti­mated HIV incidence and prevalence in the United States, 2010–2016).

Diagnoses of HIV Infection

Diagnoses of HIV infection are the numbers of per­sons aged ≥13 years with HIV diagnosed during the specified years (Tables 3a–d).

More information on counting diagnoses of HIV infection can be found at https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/library/reports/surveillance/cdc-hiv-surveillance-report-2018-preliminary-vol-30.pdf ( pdf icon[PDF – 10 MB] HIV Surveillance Report, 2018).

Linkage to HIV Medical Care

Linkage to HIV medical care within one month of HIV diagnosis is measured for persons aged ≥13 years whose infection was diagnosed during the spec­ified year, and who resided in any of the jurisdictions (including EHE Phase I jurisdictions) with complete reporting of laboratory data to CDC at the time of diagnosis (Tables 4a–f). The numerator is the number of persons aged ≥13 years with HIV diagnosed during the specified year and who had ≥1 CD4 or viral load (VL) test within 1 month of HIV diagnosis. The denominator is the number of persons aged ≥13 years with HIV infection diagnosed during the specified year. Data are not provided for states and associated jurisdictions that do not have laws requiring reporting of all CD4 and viral loads, or that have incomplete reporting of laboratory data to CDC. Areas without laws: Idaho, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Areas with incomplete reporting: Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut (2018 only), Kansas, Kentucky, Nevada (2017 only), Vermont, and Puerto Rico

More information on calculating linkage to care can be found at https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/library/reports/surveillance/cdc-hiv-surveillance-supplemental-report-vol-24-3.pdf ( pdf icon[PDF – 3 MB] Monitoring selected national HIV prevention and care objectives by using HIV surveillance data—United States and 6 dependent areas, 2017).

Viral Suppression

Viral suppression at most recent test during the speci­fied year is measured for persons aged ≥13 years who resided, as of their most recent known address during the specified year, in any of the jurisdictions (includ­ing EHE Phase I jurisdictions) with complete report­ing of laboratory data to CDC, and who were alive at the end of the specified year (Tables 5a–f). The numerator is the number of persons aged ≥13 years with HIV infection diagnosed by the end of the prior year, and who had a VL <200 copies/mL at the most recent test in the specified year. The denominator is the number of persons aged ≥13 years with HIV diag­nosed by the end of the prior year, and who were alive at the end of the specified year. Viral suppression data for the year 2018 are preliminary. Data used to calcu­late prevalence are based on deaths reported to CDC as of December 2019. The following areas had incom­plete reporting of deaths for the year 2018, and viral suppression data should be interpreted with caution: Alabama, Oklahoma, and South Carolina. Data are not provided for states and associated EHE Phase I jurisdictions that do not have laws requiring reporting of all CD4 and viral loads, or that have incomplete reporting of laboratory data to CDC. Areas without laws: Idaho, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Areas with incomplete lab reporting: Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut (2018 only), Kansas, Kentucky, Nevada (2017 only), Vermont, and Puerto Rico.

More information on calculating viral suppression can be found at https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/library/reports/surveillance/cdc-hiv-surveillance-supplemental-report-vol-24-3.pdf pdf icon[PDF – 3 MB] Monitoring selected national HIV prevention and care objectives by using HIV surveillance data—United States and 6 dependent areas, 2017).

Preexposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Coverage

PrEP coverage, reported as a percentage, is defined as the number of persons aged ≥16 years who have been prescribed PrEP during the specified year divided by the estimated number of persons aged ≥16 years who had indications for PrEP during the specified year (Tables 6a–f).

Please use caution when interpreting PrEP data. Different data sources were used in the numerator and denominator to calculate PrEP coverage.

Persons Prescribed PrEP

National pharmacy data from the IQVIA Real World Data–Longitudinal Prescriptions database (hereafter, IQVIA database) are used to classify persons aged ≥16 years who have been prescribed PrEP in the spe­cific year. The IQVIA database captures prescriptions from all payers and represents approximately 92% of all prescriptions from retail pharmacies and 60%–86% from mail-order outlets in the United States. The data­base does not include prescriptions from some closed health care systems that do not make their prescription data available to IQVIA. Therefore, these are mini­mum estimates of PrEP coverage. The annual number of persons classified as having been prescribed PrEP was based on a validated algorithm that discerns whether tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and emtricit­abine (TDF/FTC) were prescribed for PrEP after excluding prescriptions for HIV treatment, hepatitis B treatment, or HIV postexposure prophylaxis [2, 3].

The number of persons classified as having been prescribed PrEP is reported by sex, age group, and race/ethnicity. Transmission category data are not available in the IQVIA database and race/ethnicity data are available for <40% of persons with PrEP pre­scriptions. Please use caution when interpreting PrEP data by race/ethnicity. Race/ethnicity categories avail­able in the IQVIA data include white, black, Hispanic, and other. The number of persons prescribed PrEP for each racial/ethnic group presented in this report are extrapolated by applying the racial/ethnic distribution of known records to those for which data on race/ethnicity were unknown.

Geographic Designations

In the IQVIA database, a person’s location is reported as a 3-digit ZIP code prefix (hereafter, ZIP3) assigned by the U.S. Postal Service. To estimate the number of persons prescribed PrEP at the state or county level, a probability-based approach is used to crosswalk between ZIP3s and states/counties by using data from (a) the U.S Census Bureau’s American Community Survey (ACS) 5-year estimates by ZIP code Tabulate Area (ZCTA) [4], and (b) the U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development’s ZIP Code Cross­walk Files [5]. Because of reliability concerns, subna­tional estimates of <40 are not included in this report.

Persons with PrEP Indications

ACS and U.S. Census Bureau datasets were used to estimate the number of men who have sex with men (MSM) in a jurisdiction. Next, behavioral data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Sur­vey (NHANES) were used to estimate the proportion of HIV-negative MSM with indications for PrEP [6].

Finally, the number of HIV-negative MSM with indications for PrEP was multiplied by the ratio of percentage of diagnoses during the specified year attributed to other major transmission risk groups compared to the percentage among MSM in a given state or county. The estimated number of persons with indications for PrEP in the 3 major transmission risk groups (MSM, heterosexuals, persons who inject drugs) in each jurisdiction were then summed to yield a state- or county-specific estimate. State estimates were then summed for a national total of persons with indications for PrEP [7].

References

1.HHS. What is ‘Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America’? https://www.hiv.gov/federal-response/ending-the-hiv-epidemic/overview. Published October 4, 2019. Accessed March 5, 2020.external icon

2.external iconWu H, Mendoza MC, Huang YA, Hayes T, Smith DK, Hoover KW. Uptake of HIV preexposure prophylaxis among commercially insured persons—United States, 2010–2014. Clin Infect Dis 2017; 64(2):144–149. doi:10.1093/cid/ciw701.

3.CDC [Huang YA, Zhu W, Smith DK, Harris N, Hoover KW]. HIV preexposure prophylaxis, by race and ethnic­ity—United States, 2014–2016. MMWR 2018;67(41):
1147–1150. doi:10.15585/mmwr.mm6741a3.

4.U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey 5-year data (2009-2018). https://www.census.gov/data/developers/data-sets/acs-5year.2016.html. Published December 19, 2019. Accessed March 4, 2020.external icon

5.HUD. HUD USPS ZIP code crosswalk files. https://www.huduser.gov/portal/datasets/usps_crosswalk.html. Published 2019. Accessed March 4, 2020.external icon

6.CDC [Smith DK, Van Handel M, Wolitski RJ, et al]. Vital Signs: Estimated percentages and numbers of adults with indications for preexposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV acquisition—United States, 2015. MMWR 2015;64(46):1291–1295. doi:10.15585/mmwr.mm6446a4.

7.Smith DK, Van Handel M, Grey J. Estimates of adults with indications for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis by jurisdiction, transmission risk group, and race/ethnicity, United States, 2015. external iconAnn Epidemiol 2018;28(12):850–857.e9. doi:10.1016/j.annepidem.2018.05.003.

Suggested Citation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV Surveillance Data Tables (early release): Core indicators for monitoring the Ending the HIV Epidemic initiative, data reported through December 2019. http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/library/reports/ehe-core-indicators/index.html. Published March 2020. Accessed [date].

Acknowledgments

Publication of HIV Surveillance Data Tables was made possible by the contributions of the state and territorial health departments and the HIV surveillance programs that provided surveillance data to CDC.

HIV Surveillance Data Tables was prepared by the following staff and contractors of the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, CDC: Anna Satcher Johnson, Zanetta Gant, Ya-lin Huang, Dawn Smith, Rick Song, André Dailey, William Adih, Shacara Johnson, Baohua Wu, Chan Jin, Xiaohong Hu, Chenchen Yu, Irene Hall, Norma Harris, and Michael Friend (editing and desktop publishing).

Table 1a. Estimated HIV incidence among persons aged ≥13 years, by selected characteristics, 2017 and 2018—United States
2017 2018
No. RSE (%) 95% CI No. RSE (%) 95% CI
Sex at birth
Male 30,300 3.1 28,400–32,100 29,700 3.7 27,500–31,900
Female 6,700 5.7 6,000–7,500 6,700 6.5 5,900–7,600
Age at infection (yr)
13–24 8,200 5.9 7,300–9,200 7,600 7.2 6,500–8,700
25–34 14,400 4.4 13,200–15,700 14,400 5.2 12,900–15,900
35–44 6,900 6.3 6,100–7,800 7,000 7.4 6,000–8,000
45–54 4,400 7.8 3,800–5,100 4,200 9.4 3,500–5,000
≥55 3,000 9.5 2,400–3,600 3,200 10.7 2,500–3,800
Race/ethnicity
American Indian/Alaska Native *190 *38.3 *50–*340 *210 *43.9 *30–*380
Asian 610 22.3 340–870 620 26.4 300–940
Black/African American 15,500 4.2 14,200–16,800 15,300 4.9 13,800–16,800
Hispanic/Latinoa 10,200 5.7 9,000–11,300 10,300 6.7 9,000–11,700
Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander
White 9,400 5.0 8,500–10,300 9,000 5.9 7,900–10,000
Multiple races 1,100 16.3 760–1,500 910 21.2 530–1,300
Transmission categoryb
Male-to-male sexual contact 25,300 3.4 23,600–27,000 24,400 4.1 22,400–26,400
Injection drug use 2,200 10.0 1,800–2,700 2,400 11.4 1,900–2,900
Male 1,300 14.1 910–1,600 1,400 15.6 970–1,800
Female 1,000 14.0 720–1,300 1,000 16.3 680–1,300
Male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use 1,200 12.9 920–1,500 1,400 13.8 1,000–1,700
Heterosexual contactc 8,200 5.8 7,300–9,200 8,200 6.6 7,100–9,300
Male 2,500 12.7 1,900–3,100 2,500 14.4 1,800–3,200
Female 5,700 6.3 5,000–6,400 5,700 7.1 4,900–6,500
Region of residence
Northeast 5,100 7.4 4,400–5,900 5,000 8.8 4,100–5,900
Midwest 5,000 7.3 4,200–5,700 4,700 8.9 3,800–5,500
South 19,300 3.8 17,800–20,700 19,200 4.5 17,500–20,900
West 7,700 6.1 6,800–8,600 7,500 7.3 6,500–8,600
Totald 37,000 2.7 35,000–39,000 36,400 3.3 34,100–38,700

Abbreviations: RSE, relative standard error; CI, confidence interval; CD4, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (cells/μL) or percentage [footnotes only].
Note. Estimates derived by using HIV surveillance and CD4 data for persons aged ≥13 years at diagnosis.
Estimates rounded to the nearest 100 for estimates of >1,000 and to the nearest 10 for estimates of ≤1,000 to reflect model uncertainty.
Estimates with an RSE of 30%–50% are preceded by an asterisk (*) and should be used with caution because they do not meet the standard of reliability.
Estimates with an RSE of >50% are not shown and are replaced by an ellipsis (…).
aHispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
bData by transmission category have been statistically adjusted to account for missing risk-factor information.
cHeterosexual contact with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection.
dIncludes persons with HIV infection attributed to hemophilia or blood transfusion, or whose risk factor was not reported or identified.

Table 1b. Estimated HIV incidence among persons aged ≥13 years, by area of residence, 2017 and 2018—United States and Puerto Rico
2017 2018
Area of residence No. RSE (%) 95% CI No. RSE (%) 95% CI
Alabama 630 20.3 380–880 580 24.5 300–870
Alaska
Arizonaa 800 19.6 490–1,100 850 22.4 480–1,200
Arkansasa *300 *32.8 *110–*500 *250 *43.5 *40–*460
California 4,800 7.4 4,100–5,500 4,600 8.9 3,800–5,300
Colorado 470 23.7 250–690 *380 *32.8 *140–*620
Connecticuta *240 *32.0 *90–*390 *190 *43.2 *30–*350
Delaware 140 *43.5 20–260
District of Columbia *210 *31.8 *80–*340 *210 *34.8 *70–*350
Florida 4,400 7.3 3,700–5,000 4,300 8.5 3,600–5,000
Georgia 2,500 10.5 2,000–3,100 2,600 12.4 1,900–3,200
Hawaii *110 *47.8 *10–*220
Idahoa
Illinois 1,400 14.0 990–1,700 1,300 16.9 880–1,700
Indiana 550 24.9 280–820 590 28.1 260–910
Iowa
Kansasa
Kentuckya 350 29.4 150–550 440 29.9 180–690
Louisiana 1,100 16.7 730–1,400 1,100 18.9 720–1,600
Maine
Maryland 750 18.2 480–1,000 850 18.4 540–1,200
Massachusetts 580 20.3 350–820 710 20.5 430–1,000
Michigan 730 20.2 440–1,000 700 24.3 360–1,000
Minnesota *230 *34.4 *70–*380 *310 *34.0 *100–*520
Mississippi *470 *30.8 *180–*750 *430 *38.8 *100–*750
Missouri 540 20.1 330–760 450 27.0 210–690
Montana
Nebraska *120 *47.8 *10–*230
Nevadaa 600 24.0 320–880 650 27.1 310–1,000
New Hampshire
New Jerseya 1,100 17.7 710–1,500 950 22.4 530–1,400
New Mexico *130 *44.4 *20–*240
New York 2,200 10.7 1,800–2,700 2,100 12.9 1,600–2,600
North Carolina 1,100 13.9 830–1,500 970 18.2 620–1,300
North Dakota
Ohio 950 17.0 640–1,300 880 20.8 520–1,200
Oklahoma 320 28.5 140–510 *310 *37.7 *80–*540
Oregon *200 *37.6 *50–*360 *210 *45.3 *20–*400
Pennsylvaniaa 940 24.5 490–1,400 890 26.7 430–1,400
Puerto Ricoa 400 25.4 200–600 *330 *31.5 *130–*540
Rhode Island
South Carolina 700 22.7 390–1,000 700 27.0 330–1,100
South Dakota
Tennessee 670 17.9 440–910 660 20.6 390–920
Texas 4,400 8.0 3,700–5,100 4,600 9.2 3,800–5,400
Utah *120 *45.6 *10–*220
Vermonta
Virginia 850 17.8 550–1,100 800 21.4 460–1,100
Washington 480 24.5 250–720 540 27.1 250–830
West Virginia
Wisconsin *240 *33.4 *80–*390 *190 *45.4 *20–*360
Wyoming

Abbreviations: RSE, relative standard error; CI, confidence interval; CD4, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (cells/µL) or percentage [footnotes only].
Note. Estimates derived by using HIV surveillance and CD4 data for persons aged ≥13 years at diagnosis. Estimates rounded to the nearest 100 for estimates of >1,000 and to the nearest 10 for estimates of ≤1,000 to reflect model uncertainty. Estimates with an RSE of 30%–50% are preceded by an asterisk (*) and should be used with caution because they do not meet the standard of reliability. Estimates with an RSE of >50% are not shown and are replaced by an ellipsis (…).
aEstimates should be interpreted with caution because the jurisdiction does not have laws requiring complete reporting of laboratory data or has incomplete reporting. Areas without laws: Idaho, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Areas with incomplete reporting: Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut (2018 only), Kansas, Kentucky, Nevada (2017 only), Vermont, and Puerto Rico.

Table 1c. Estimated HIV incidence among persons aged ≥13 years, by area of residence, 2017 and 2018—Ending the HIV Epidemic Phase I jurisdictions
2017 2018
Area of residence No. RSE (%) 95% CI No. RSE (%) 95% CI
Arizona
Maricopa Countya 530 22.8 290–760 560 25.9 280–850
California
Alameda County *190 *36.1 *60–*320 *180 *43.5 *30–*330
Los Angeles County 1,500 12.8 1,100–1,900 1,400 15.7 950–1,800
Orange County 290 29.0 130–460 *270 *35.3 *80–*460
Riverside County *280 *30.1 *110–*440 *280 *34.7 *90–*470
Sacramento County *230 *32.6 *80–*380 *180 *44.0 *20–*330
San Bernardino County *260 *31.0 *100–*420 *260 *36.1 *80–*450
San Diego County 480 22.8 260–690 440 27.6 200–690
San Francisco County *180 *37.5 *50–*310 *170 *44.6 *20–*320
District of Columbia *210 *31.8 *80–*340 *210 *34.8 *70–*350
Florida
Broward County 670 17.7 440–900 580 21.9 330–830
Duval County 250 28.7 110–400 *210 *36.3 *60–*360
Hillsborough County 280 27.1 130–440 *280 *31.4 *110–*460
Miami-Dade County 1,100 13.6 830–1,400 1,100 15.6 790–1,500
Orange County 420 22.4 230–600 450 25.0 230–670
Palm Beach County 270 27.7 120–420 *240 *33.8 *80–*410
Pinellas County *140 *38.7 *30–*250 *140 *44.1 *20–*270
Georgia
Cobb County *180 *37.4 *50–*310
DeKalb County 350 26.8 160–530 *400 *30.0 *160–*640
Fulton County 560 21.1 330–790 670 23.2 370–980
Gwinnett County *150 *41.4 *30–*260 *150 *49.8 *0–*290
Illinois
Cook County 1,000 16.0 690–1,300 910 20.0 550–1,300
Indiana
Marion County *250 *34.9 *80–*420 *230 *42.7 *40–*430
Louisiana
East Baton Rouge Parish *190 *35.0 *60–*330 *210 *38.7 *50–*380
Orleans Parish *190 *35.8 *60–*320 *180 *42.5 *30–*330
Maryland
Baltimore City *180 *37.1 *50–*310 *210 *36.7 *60–*370
Montgomery County *110 *47.4 *10–*220 90 0–200
Prince George’s County *200 *35.9 *60–*330 *270 *32.9 *90–*440
Massachusetts
Suffolk County *140 *41.4 *30–*260 *140 *45.5 *10–*260
Michigan
Wayne County 310 28.8 130–490 *300 *35.2 *90–*510
Nevada
Clark Countya 540 24.5 280–800 590 27.8 270–920
New Jersey
Essex Countya *330 *30.0 *140–*520 *220 *43.8 *30–*410
Hudson Countya *160 *43.4 *20–*300 *190 *48.0 *10–*360
New York
Bronx County 390 24.6 200–580 420 27.3 190–650
Kings County 500 21.7 290–720 460 26.1 230–700
New York County 340 26.2 170–520 *300 *32.4 *110–*490
Queens County 320 27.1 150–490 *320 *31.4 *120–*510
North Carolina
Mecklenburg County 270 27.6 120–420 *170 *48.9 *10–*330
Ohio
Cuyahoga County *130 *46.3 *10–*260
Franklin County *200 *38.3 *50–*350 *200 *43.1 *30–*380
Hamilton County *160 *42.7 *30–*290
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia County 380 22.2 220–550 390 25.0 200–580
Puerto Rico
San Juan Municipioa
Tennessee
Shelby County *220 *30.7 *90–*350 *240 *32 *90–*390
Texas
Bexar County 310 29.5 130–490 *370 *32.0 *140–*590
Dallas County 790 18.4 510–1,100 810 21.5 470–1,200
Harris County 1,100 15.4 790–1,500 1,200 17.7 770–1,600
Tarrant County 310 29.8 130–480 *260 *38 *70–*450
Travis County *210 *35.8 *60–*360 *250 *38.6 *60–*440
Washington
King County *210 *36.5 *60–*370 *310 *34.6 *100–*520

Abbreviations: RSE, relative standard error; CI, confidence interval; CD4, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (cells/µL) or percentage [footnotes only].
Note. Estimates derived by using HIV surveillance and CD4 data for persons aged ≥13 years at diagnosis. Estimates rounded to the nearest 100 for estimates of >1,000 and to the nearest 10 for estimates of ≤1,000 to reflect model uncertainty. Estimates with an RSE of 30%–50% are preceded by an asterisk (*) and should be used with caution because they do not meet the standard of reliability. Estimates with an RSE of >50% are not shown and are replaced by an ellipsis (…).
aEstimates should be interpreted with caution because the jurisdiction does not have laws requiring complete reporting of laboratory data or has incomplete reporting. Areas without laws: New Jersey and Pennsylvania (excluding Philadelphia County). Areas with incomplete reporting: Arizona, Nevada (2017 only), and Puerto Rico.

Table 2a. Estimated HIV prevalence among persons aged ≥13 years, by selected characteristics, 2017 and 2018—United States
Persons living with diagnosed or undiagnosed HIV infection Persons living with diagnosed HIV infection
No. RSE (%) 95% CI No.a % RSE (%) 95% CI
2017
Sex at birth
Male 893,800 1.0 875,900–911,600 758,229 84.8 1.0 83.2–86.6
Female 258,700 1.7 250,200–267,100 230,317 89.0 1.7 86.2–92.1
Age at infection (yr)
13–24 54,400 1.5 52,800–56,100 27,464 50.5 1.5 49.0–52.1
25–34 210,000 0.6 207,300–212,600 148,461 70.7 0.6 69.8–71.6
35–44 221,400 0.5 219,300–223,500 187,660 84.8 0.5 84.0–85.6
45–54 318,200 0.4 316,000–320,400 293,939 92.4 0.4 91.7–93.0
≥55 348,500 0.4 345,700–351,300 331,022 95.0 0.4 94.2–95.8
Race/ethnicity
American Indian/Alaska Native 3,700 16.7 2,500–4,900 2,958 79.7 18.7 60.0–100
Asianb 17,000 7.1 14,600–19,400 14,030 82.6 7.3 72.5–96.0
Black/African American 474,100 1.4 461,300–486,800 405,295 85.5 1.4 83.3–87.9
Hispanic/Latinoc 266,300 1.9 256,600–276,100 220,585 82.8 1.9 79.9–86.0
Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander *1,000 *30.2 *410–*1,600 *819 *80.7 *46.7 *50.6–*100
White 336,600 1.6 326,200–346,900 297,526 88.4 1.6 85.8–91.2
Multiple races 53,000 3.6 49,300–56,800 46,591 87.8 3.6 82.0–94.6
Transmission categoryd
Male-to-male sexual contact 661,800 1.2 646,600–676,900 553,173 83.6 1.2 81.7–85.5
Injection drug use 126,800 2.6 120,400–133,200 118,416 93.4 2.6 88.9–98.3
Male 74,600 3.5 69,400–79,700 69,360 93.0 3.5 87.0–99.9
Female 52,300 3.7 48,500–56,000 49,056 93.9 3.7 87.5–100
Male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use 60,600 3.4 56,500–64,600 55,760 92.0 3.4 86.2–98.6
Heterosexual contacte 299,800 1.7 290,100–309,500 257,923 86.0 1.7 83.3–88.9
Male 94,800 3.4 88,500–101,000 77,963 82.3 3.4 77.2–88.1
Female 205,000 1.9 197,600–212,500 179,961 87.8 1.9 84.7–91.1
Region of residence
Northeast 253,800 1.8 244,800–262,800 228,985 90.2 1.8 87.1–93.5
Midwest 140,400 2.5 133,500–147,300 118,040 84.1 2.5 80.1–88.4
South 527,700 1.3 514,100–541,300 445,343 84.4 1.3 82.3–86.6
West 230,600 1.9 221,800–239,300 196,178 85.1 1.9 82.0–88.4
Totalf 1,152,400 0.9 1,132,700–1,172,200 988,546 85.8 0.9 84.3–87.3
2018
Sex at birth
Male 912,100 1.1 892,000–932,100 777,859 85.3 1.1 83.4–87.2
Female 261,800 1.8 252,400–271,100 234,181 89.5 1.8 86.4–92.8
Age at infection (yr)
13–24 47,800 1.9 46,000–49,600 26,296 55.1 1.9 53.1–57.2
25–34 216,600 0.7 213,600–219,700 153,228 70.7 0.7 69.8–71.7
35–44 225,200 0.5 222,800–227,500 190,122 84.4 0.5 83.6–85.3
45–54 305,300 0.4 303,000–307,600 282,123 92.4 0.4 91.7–93.1
≥55 379,000 0.4 376,000–382,000 360,271 95.1 0.4 94.3–95.8
Race/ethnicity
American Indian/Alaska Native 3,900 18.3 2,500–5,300 3,104 80.1 21.1 58.9–100
Asianb 17,600 7.8 14,900–20,300 14,922 85.0 8.0 73.7–100
Black/African American 482,900 1.5 468,700–497,200 415,175 86.0 1.5 83.5–88.6
Hispanic/Latinoc 274,100 2.1 263,000–285,200 228,379 83.3 2.1 80.1–86.8
Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander *1,100 *33.6 *360–*1,800
White 340,700 1.7 329,200–352,100 302,340 88.7 1.7 85.9–91.8
Multiple races 52,900 4.0 48,700–57,100 46,503 87.9 4.0 81.5–95.4
Transmission categoryd
Male-to-male sexual contact 679,800 1.3 662,700–696,900 571,934 84.1 1.3 82.1–86.3
Injection drug use 125,900 2.8 118,900–132,800 117,710 93.5 2.8 88.6–99.0
Male 73,900 3.9 68,300–79,500 68,794 93.1 3.9 86.6–100
Female 52,000 4.0 47,900–56,100 48,916 94.1 4.1 87.2–100
Male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use 60,600 3.7 56,100–65,000 55,781 92.1 3.8 85.8–99.4
Heterosexual contacte 304,200 1.8 293,400–315,000 263,355 86.6 1.8 83.6–89.8
Male 95,800 3.7 88,800–102,700 79,401 82.9 3.7 77.3–89.4
Female 208,400 2.0 200,100–216,700 183,955 88.3 2.0 84.9–91.9
Region of residence
Northeast 255,600 2.0 245,700–265,500 231,282 90.5 2.0 87.1–94.1
Midwest 143,200 2.7 135,500–150,900 121,147 84.6 2.7 80.3–89.4
South 539,600 1.4 524,300–554,900 457,974 84.9 1.4 82.5–87.3
West 235,400 2.1 225,600–245,300 201,637 85.6 2.1 82.2–89.4
Totalf 1,173,900 1.0 1,151,700–1,196,000 1,012,040 86.2 1.0 84.6–87.9

Abbreviations: RSE, relative standard error; CI, confidence interval; CD4, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (cells/µL) or percentage [footnotes only].
Note. Estimates for the year 2018 data are preliminary and based on deaths reported to CDC as of December 2019. Estimates derived by using HIV surveillance and CD4 data for persons aged ≥13 years at diagnosis. Estimates rounded to the nearest 100 for estimates of >1,000 and to the nearest 10 for estimates of ≤1,000 to reflect model uncertainty. Estimates with an RSE of 30%–50% are preceded by an asterisk (*) and should be used with caution because they do not meet the standard of reliability. Estimates with an RSE of >50% are not shown and are replaced by an ellipsis (…).
aReported to the National HIV Surveillance System.
bIncludes Asian/Pacific Islander legacy cases.
cHispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
dData by transmission category have been statistically adjusted to account for missing risk-factor information.
eHeterosexual contact with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection.
fIncludes persons with HIV infection attributed to hemophilia or blood transfusion, or whose risk factor was not reported or not identified.

Table 2b. Estimated HIV prevalence among persons aged ≥13 years, by area of residence, 2017 and 2018—United States and Puerto Rico
Persons living with diagnosed or undiagnosed HIV infection Persons living with diagnosed HIV infection
Area of residence No. RSE (%) 95% CI No.a % RSE (%) 95% CI
2017
Alabamab 15,700 7.7 13,300–18,100 12,940 82.3 7.9 71.5–97.0
Alaska *810 *30.5 *320–*1,300 *703 *87.0 *47.7 *54.4–*100
Arizonac 19,000 6.8 16,400–21,500 15,779 83.2 7.0 73.4–96.1
Arkansasc 6,800 11.9 5,200–8,400 5,561 81.4 12.6 66.0–100
California 146,700 2.4 139,900–153,500 127,569 87.0 2.4 83.1–91.2
Colorado 14,400 7.1 12,400–16,300 12,137 84.6 7.3 74.2–98.3
Connecticutc 11,400 8.3 9,500–13,200 10,157 89.2 8.5 76.7–100
Delaware 3,800 15.4 2,600–4,900 3,233 86.1 16.9 66.2–100
District of Columbia 15,100 7.1 13,000–17,300 14,189 93.7 7.3 82.2–100
Florida 124,100 2.6 117,700–130,500 107,258 86.4 2.6 82.2–91.1
Georgia 63,400 3.7 58,800–68,000 52,338 82.6 3.7 77.0–89.0
Hawaii 2,700 17.2 1,800–3,600 2,470 90.7 19.4 67.8–100
Idahoc 1,300 27.6 600–2,000 *1,113 *85.1 *39.2 *55.2–*100
Illinois 40,300 4.6 36,700–44,000 34,703 86.0 4.7 78.8–94.6
Indiana 13,500 8.6 11,200–15,700 10,991 81.7 8.8 69.9–98.2
Iowa 3,300 16.3 2,200–4,300 2,647 80.9 18.2 61.2–100
Kansasc 3,600 16.5 2,500–4,800 2,967 81.7 18.5 61.7–100
Kentuckyc 8,600 10.2 6,900–10,400 7,028 81.3 10.7 67.7–100
Louisiana 24,600 6.4 21,500–27,700 20,229 82.3 6.5 73.1–94.1
Maine 1,800 20.6 1,100–2,500 1,545 85.2 24.7 60.6–100
Maryland 36,500 4.7 33,100–39,900 32,175 88.2 4.8 80.7–97.2
Massachusetts 22,400 5.8 19,900–24,900 20,106 89.7 5.8 80.6–100
Michigan 18,500 7.3 15,900–21,200 15,475 83.6 7.5 73.1–97.6
Minnesota 9,600 8.7 7,900–11,200 8,172 85.3 9.0 72.9–100
Mississippi 11,100 10.0 8,900–13,300 9,235 83.1 10.4 69.4–100
Missouri 14,300 7.5 12,200–16,400 12,210 85.6 7.7 74.7–100
Montana *740 *31.2 *290–*1,200 *613 *83.1 *50.0 *51.6–*100
Nebraska 2,500 18.3 1,600–3,500 2,100 82.6 21.1 60.7–100
Nevadac 12,200 8.6 10,200–14,300 9,503 77.6 8.9 66.4–93.5
New Hampshire 1,400 23.0 770–2,000 1,168 83.4 28.9 57.4–100
New Jerseyc 38,200 5.2 34,300–42,100 34,212 89.6 5.2 81.3–99.7
New Mexico 4,100 14.0 3,000–5,200 3,388 82.5 15.1 64.7–100
New York 136,200 2.4 129,900–142,500 123,702 90.8 2.4 86.8–95.2
North Carolina 35,500 4.7 32,200–38,800 30,572 86.2 4.8 78.9–95.0
North Dakota *630 *48.8 *30–*1,200
Ohio 26,100 5.9 23,100–29,100 21,696 83.3 6.0 74.7–94.1
Oklahomab 7,200 11.3 5,600–8,800 5,983 83.0 11.9 67.9–100
Oregon 8,000 9.8 6,400–9,500 6,826 85.7 10.2 71.9–100
Pennsylvaniac 39,200 5.1 35,300–43,200 34,916 89.0 5.2 80.9–99.0
Puerto Ricoc 17,100 7.9 14,400–19,800 15,706 91.8 8.1 79.5–100
Rhode Island 2,900 16.4 2,000–3,800 2,501 86.6 18.3 65.5–100
South Carolinab 20,100 6.9 17,400–22,900 16,668 82.8 7.0 72.9–95.7
South Dakota *730 *35.4 *220–*1,200
Tennessee 19,800 6.5 17,200–22,300 16,491 83.4 6.7 73.9–95.7
Texas 106,700 2.9 100,600–112,900 87,465 81.9 2.9 77.5–86.9
Utah 3,400 15.4 2,400–4,400 2,720 80.0 16.9 61.5–100
Vermontc *810 *36.4 *230–*1,400
Virginia 25,700 5.6 22,900–28,500 22,199 86.3 5.7 77.8–97.0
Washington 15,200 7.3 13,000–17,400 13,040 85.9 7.5 75.2–100
West Virginia 2,200 21.1 1,300–3,100 1,779 80.3 25.5 56.8–100
Wisconsin 7,200 10.7 5,700–8,700 6,116 85.1 11.2 70.4–100
Wyoming *400 *47.0 *30–*770
2018
Alabamab 16,200 8.4 13,500–18,900 13,478 83.2 8.6 71.5–99.7
Alaska *820 *33.3 *280–*1,400
Arizonac 19,600 7.6 16,700–22,500 16,445 84.0 7.8 73.1–98.6
Arkansasc 7,000 13.1 5,200–8,800 5,674 81.2 14.1 64.5–100
California 149,500 2.6 141,900–157,200 130,259 87.1 2.6 82.9–91.8
Colorado 14,600 7.8 12,400–16,900 12,604 86.3 8.0 74.8–100
Connecticutc 11,400 9.0 9,400–13,400 10,316 90.5 9.3 76.9–100
Delaware 3,800 16.9 2,500–5,000 3,269 86.2 19.0 64.8–100
District of Columbia 15,100 7.7 12,800–17,400 14,067 93.0 7.9 80.8–100
Florida 126,400 2.9 119,300–133,600 109,500 86.6 2.9 82.0–91.8
Georgia 65,200 4.1 59,900–70,400 54,117 83.1 4.1 76.9–90.3
Hawaii 2,700 18.9 1,700–3,800 2,421 88.2 21.9 64.4–100
Idahoc *1,400 *31.7 *510–*2,200
Illinois 41,200 5.1 37,100–45,300 35,512 86.2 5.1 78.3–95.7
Indiana 13,900 9.5 11,300–16,400 11,377 82.1 9.8 69.2–100
Iowa 3,400 18.3 2,200–4,600 2,763 81.7 21.0 60.2–100
Kansasc 3,700 18.4 2,400–5,100 3,047 82.0 21.1 60.3–100
Kentuckyc 9,000 11.3 7,000–10,900 7,274 81.2 11.9 66.4–100
Louisiana 25,300 7.1 21,800–28,800 20,739 82.0 7.2 72.0–95.2
Maine 1,800 22.6 1,000–2,700 1,590 86.5 28.1 60.0–100
Maryland 36,800 5.1 33,100–40,500 32,652 88.8 5.2 80.7–98.8
Massachusetts 22,900 6.3 20,100–25,700 20,413 89.2 6.4 79.4–100
Michigan 18,900 8.1 15,900–21,900 15,798 83.6 8.3 72.2–99.3
Minnesota 9,800 9.6 8,000–11,700 8,462 86.3 10.0 72.6–100
Mississippi 11,300 11.2 8,800–13,800 9,355 82.5 11.8 67.6–100
Missouri 14,500 8.3 12,100–16,800 12,529 86.5 8.5 74.4–100
Montana *750 *34.5 *240–*1,300
Nebraska 2,600 20.1 1,500–3,600 2,145 84.0 23.8 60.2–100
Nevadac 12,700 9.7 10,300–15,100 10,138 79.7 10.0 67.0–98.4
New Hampshire 1,400 24.9 720–2,100 *1,238 *88.3 *32.8 *59.3–*100
New Jerseyc 38,500 5.7 34,200–42,800 34,360 89.3 5.8 80.3–100
New Mexico 4,200 15.4 2,900–5,500 3,560 84.7 17.0 65.0–100
New York 136,700 2.6 129,800–143,600 124,555 91.1 2.6 86.8–95.9
North Carolina 36,000 5.2 32,300–39,600 31,514 87.6 5.2 79.5–97.5
North Dakota
Ohio 26,600 6.4 23,200–29,900 22,222 83.6 6.6 74.2–95.7
Oklahomab 7,500 12.5 5,600–9,300 6,194 83.1 13.4 66.7–100
Oregon 8,100 10.8 6,400–9,800 7,006 86.6 11.4 71.4–100
Pennsylvaniac 39,500 5.7 35,100–44,000 35,559 89.9 5.8 80.9–100
Puerto Ricoc 17,100 8.5 14,300–20,000 15,596 91.1 8.8 78.0–100
Rhode Island 2,900 17.8 1,900–3,900 2,553 87.8 20.2 65.1–100
South Carolinab 20,600 7.6 *17,500–*23,700 17,222 83.5 7.8 72.6–98.2
South Dakota *760 *40.4 *160–*1,400
Tennessee 20,000 7.2 17,200–22,900 17,183 85.7 7.3 75.2–99.7
Texas 110,100 3.2 103,200–117,100 91,045 82.7 3.2 77.8–88.2
Utah 3,500 16.9 2,300–4,600 2,897 83.3 19.0 62.6–100
Vermontc *820 *40.1 *170–*1,500
Virginia 26,200 6.2 23,100–29,400 22,819 86.9 6.3 77.6–98.9
Washington 15,500 8.1 13,000–18,000 13,472 86.9 8.3 75.0–100
West Virginia 2,300 23.7 1,200–3,300 *1,872 *82.5 *30.2 *56.4–*100
Wisconsin 7,300 11.8 5,600–9,000 6,253 85.9 12.4 69.8–100
Wyoming

Abbreviations: RSE, relative standard error; CI, confidence interval; CD4, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (cells/µL) or percentage [footnotes only].
Note. Estimates for the year 2018 data are preliminary and based on deaths reported to CDC as of December 2019. Estimates derived by using HIV surveillance and CD4 data for persons aged ≥13 years at diagnosis. Estimates rounded to the nearest 100 for estimates of >1,000 and to the nearest 10 for estimates of ≤1,000 to reflect model uncertainty. Estimates with an RSE of 30%–50% are preceded by an asterisk (*) and should be used with caution because they do not meet the standard of reliability. Estimates with an RSE of >50% are not shown and are replaced by an ellipsis (…).
aReported to the National HIV Surveillance System.
bEstimates should be interpreted with caution due to incomplete ascertainment of deaths that occurred during the year 2018.
cEstimates should be interpreted with caution because the jurisdiction does not have laws requiring complete reporting of laboratory data or has incomplete reporting. Areas without laws: Idaho, New Jersey, Pennsylvania. Areas with incomplete reporting: Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut (2018 only), Kansas, Kentucky, Nevada (2017 only), Vermont, and Puerto Rico.

Table 2c. Estimated HIV prevalence among persons aged ≥13 years, by area of residence, 2017 and 2018—Ending the HIV Epidemic Phase I jurisdictions
Persons living with diagnosed or undiagnosed HIV infection Persons living with diagnosed HIV infection
Area of residence No. RSE (%) 95% CI No.a % RSE (%) 95% CI
2017
Arizona
Maricopa Countyb 12,900 8.1 10,900–15,000 10,798 83.7 8.3 72.2–99.5
California
Alameda County 6,800 11.0 5,300–8,300 5,845 85.7 11.6 70.5–100
Los Angeles County 54,000 3.8 50,000–58,100 48,364 89.5 3.9 83.2–96.8
Orange County 8,000 10.2 6,400–9,600 6,738 84.2 10.6 70.2–100
Riverside County 10,100 8.0 8,500–11,700 8,478 84.0 8.3 72.6–99.8
Sacramento County 5,000 13.2 3,700–6,200 4,154 83.9 14.1 66.6–100
San Bernardino County 5,300 13.0 3,900–6,600 4,077 77.4 13.9 61.7–100
San Diego County 15,100 7.1 13,000–17,300 12,871 85.0 7.3 74.6–98.9
San Francisco County 12,900 8.0 10,900–14,900 12,290 95.2 8.2 82.3–100
District of Columbia 15,100 7.1 13,000–17,300 14,189 93.7 7.3 82.2–100
Florida
Broward County 21,500 6.0 19,000–24,000 18,936 88.0 6.1 78.7–99.7
Duval County 7,100 11.1 5,600–8,700 5,818 81.7 11.6 67.1–100
Hillsborough County 7,700 10.5 6,100–9,300 6,561 85.2 11.0 70.7–100
Miami-Dade County 28,900 5.6 25,700–32,000 25,653 88.8 5.6 80.1–99.7
Orange County 9,600 9.3 7,900–11,400 8,231 85.4 9.7 72.2–100
Palm Beach County 8,800 9.8 7,100–10,500 7,706 87.7 10.1 73.6–100
Pinellas County 5,000 12.9 3,800–6,300 4,410 87.8 13.8 70.0–100
Georgia
Cobb County 3,700 14.8 2,600–4,700 2,994 81.5 16.1 63.2–100
DeKalb County 9,700 9.1 7,900–11,400 8,103 83.8 9.4 71.2–100
Fulton County 17,500 7.0 15,000–19,900 14,267 81.7 7.2 71.8–94.8
Gwinnett County 3,300 15.0 2,300–4,200 2,721 83.3 16.4 64.4–100
Illinois
Cook County 28,300 5.6 25,200–31,400 24,724 87.3 5.6 78.7–98.1
Indiana
Marion County 5,500 13.1 4,100–6,900 4,502 82.4 14.0 65.5–100
Louisiana
East Baton Rouge Parish 4,500 14.2 3,300–5,800 3,808 83.9 15.4 65.6–100
Orleans Parish 5,600 13.0 4,100–7,000 4,798 86.1 13.9 68.6–100
Maryland
Baltimore City 10,300 9.4 8,400–12,200 10,053 97.7 9.7 82.5–100
Montgomery County 3,900 14.1 2,800–5,000 3,320 84.2 15.3 65.9–100
Prince George’s County 6,600 11.6 5,100–8,100 5,897 89.9 12.3 73.2–100
Massachusetts
Suffolk County 6,200 11.1 4,900–7,600 5,712 92.0 11.6 75.6–100
Michigan
Wayne County 7,800 11.4 6,100–9,600 6,363 81.4 12.1 66.5–100
Nevada
Clark Countyb 10,300 9.3 8,500–12,200 7,991 77.3 9.7 65.3–94.6
New Jersey
Essex Countyb 9,800 10.5 7,800–11,900 8,975 91.2 11.0 75.6–100
Hudson Countyb 5,400 13.6 3,900–6,800 4,811 89.7 14.7 70.8–100
New York
Bronx County 29,300 4.9 26,500–32,100 26,610 90.8 4.9 82.9–100
Kings County 28,400 5.3 25,400–31,300 25,736 90.8 5.3 82.3–100
New York County 29,100 5.1 26,200–32,000 26,770 92.1 5.2 83.7–100
Queens County 17,000 6.5 14,800–19,200 15,401 90.6 6.6 80.3–100
North Carolina
Mecklenburg County 6,500 11.1 5,100–7,900 5,642 86.6 11.6 71.1–100
Ohio
Cuyahoga County 5,400 12.6 4,100–6,800 4,583 84.6 13.4 67.8–100
Franklin County 5,600 12.5 4,200–7,000 4,749 84.5 13.4 67.8–100
Hamilton County 3,500 16.3 2,400–4,600 2,888 82.8 18.2 62.7–100
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia County 18,400 6.7 16,000–20,800 16,813 91.3 6.8 80.7–100
Puerto Rico
San Juan Municipiob 3,400 18.9 2,100–4,600 3,170 93.6 22.0 68.2–100
Tennessee
Shelby County 7,000 11.3 5,500–8,600 6,031 85.8 11.9 70.2–100
Texas
Bexar County 7,300 11.2 5,700–8,900 6,083 83.5 11.8 68.4–100
Dallas County 20,900 6.5 18,300–23,600 17,348 83.0 6.6 73.6–95.1
Harris County 29,600 5.6 26,400–32,800 24,632 83.2 5.7 75.0–93.4
Tarrant County 6,600 11.6 5,100–8,100 5,435 82.6 12.2 67.3–100
Travis County 5,800 12.4 4,400–7,300 4,714 80.7 13.2 64.9–100
Washington
King County 7,600 10.3 6,100–9,100 6,763 89.2 10.7 74.3–100
2018
Arizona
Maricopa Countyb 13,300 9.0 11,000–15,700 11,246 84.4 9.3 71.8–100
California
Alameda County 6,900 12.0 5,300–8,600 6,013 86.8 12.7 70.2–100
Los Angeles County 54,900 4.2 50,300–59,400 49,184 89.7 4.2 82.9–97.7
Orange County 8,200 11.2 6,400–10,000 6,836 83.6 11.7 68.5–100
Riverside County 10,200 8.9 8,400–12,000 8,989 88.1 9.2 74.9–100
Sacramento County 5,100 14.4 3,600–6,500 4,249 83.9 15.6 65.4–100
San Bernardino County 5,500 14.3 3,900–7,000 4,426 80.9 15.5 63.2–100
San Diego County 15,500 7.8 13,100–17,800 13,048 84.4 8.0 73.2–99.7
San Francisco County 12,900 8.6 10,700–15,100 12,128 94.0 8.9 80.4–100
District of Columbia 15,100 7.7 12,800–17,400 14,067 93.0 7.9 80.8–100
Florida
Broward County 21,900 6.5 19,100–24,600 19,249 88.1 6.6 78.1–100
Duval County 7,200 12.1 5,500–8,900 6,006 83.3 12.8 67.4–100
Hillsborough County 7,800 11.5 6,100–9,600 6,757 86.2 12.1 70.3–100
Miami-Dade County 29,600 6.0 26,100–33,100 26,015 87.9 6.1 78.6–99.7
Orange County 10,000 10.2 8,000–12,000 8,514 85.4 10.6 71.2–100
Palm Beach County 8,900 10.6 7,000–10,700 7,790 87.9 11.1 72.8–100
Pinellas County 5,100 14.1 3,700–6,500 4,427 87.5 15.2 68.5–100
Georgia
Cobb County 3,800 16.2 2,600–5,000 3,130 83.0 18.0 63.0–100
DeKalb County 9,900 10.0 8,000–11,900 8,371 84.2 10.4 70.4–100
Fulton County 18,000 7.7 15,200–20,700 15,044 83.7 7.9 72.7–98.7
Gwinnett County 3,400 16.5 2,300–4,400 2,829 84.1 18.4 63.6–100
Illinois
Cook County 28,900 6.1 25,400–32,300 24,970 86.5 6.2 77.3–98.3
Indiana
Marion County 5,600 14.4 4,000–7,200 4,645 82.9 15.7 64.6–100
Louisiana
East Baton Rouge Parish 4,700 15.6 3,200–6,100 3,888 83.6 17.3 63.9–100
Orleans Parish 5,700 14.2 4,100–7,300 4,893 86.3 15.5 67.5–100
Maryland
Baltimore City 10,100 10.2 8,100–12,200 9,317 91.9 10.7 76.5–100
Montgomery County 4,000 15.3 2,800–5,200 3,545 88.8 16.8 68.4–100
Prince George’s County 6,800 12.6 5,100–8,400 5,762 85.3 13.4 68.4–100
Massachusetts
Suffolk County 6,300 12.0 4,800–7,800 5,679 90.3 12.7 73.1–100
Michigan
Wayne County 8,000 12.6 6,000–9,900 6,673 83.7 13.4 67.2–100
Nevada
Clark Countyb 10,800 10.4 8,600–13,000 8,541 79.3 10.9 65.8–99.7
New Jersey
Essex Countyb 9,900 11.5 7,600–12,100 8,952 90.8 12.1 74.2–100
Hudson Countyb 5,500 14.9 3,900–7,100 4,821 88.3 16.3 68.3–100
New York
Bronx County 29,300 5.3 26,200–32,300 26,849 91.7 5.4 83.1–100
Kings County 28,400 5.7 25,200–31,600 25,939 91.2 5.8 82.1–100
New York County 29,100 5.5 26,000–32,300 26,790 91.9 5.6 83.0–100
Queens County 17,200 7.1 14,800–19,600 15,620 90.6 7.2 79.6–100
North Carolina
Mecklenburg County 6,600 12.1 5,000–8,200 5,831 88.1 12.8 71.2–100
Ohio
Cuyahoga County 5,500 13.7 4,000–7,000 4,669 85.2 14.8 67.1–100
Franklin County 5,800 13.8 4,200–7,300 4,804 83.4 14.9 65.6–100
Hamilton County 3,600 17.9 2,300–4,800 2,923 82.1 20.5 60.7–100
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia County 18,500 7.2 15,900–21,100 16,679 90.3 7.3 79.2–100
Puerto Rico
San Juan Municipiob 3,400 20.3 2,000–4,700 3,213 95.1 24.2 68.0–100
Tennessee
Shelby County 7,200 12.2 5,400–8,900 6,156 86.0 13.0 69.4–100
Texas
Bexar County 7,600 12.3 5,800–9,400 6,266 82.5 13.1 66.4–100
Dallas County 21,500 7.1 18,500–24,500 18,032 83.9 7.3 73.6–97.5
Harris County 30,400 6.1 26,700–34,000 25,433 83.8 6.2 74.8–95.2
Tarrant County 6,800 12.8 5,100–8,500 5,662 83.8 13.6 67.0–100
Travis County 6,100 13.7 4,400–7,700 4,902 80.8 14.7 63.7–100
Washington
King County 7,800 11.4 6,000–9,500 6,844 88.1 12.0 72.1–100

Abbreviations: RSE, relative standard error; CI, confidence interval; CD4, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (cells/µL) or percentage [footnotes only].
Note. Estimates for the year 2018 data are preliminary and based on deaths reported to CDC as of December 2019.
Estimates derived by using HIV surveillance data and CD4 data for persons aged ≥13 years at diagnosis.
Estimates rounded to the nearest 100 for estimates of >1,000 and to the nearest 10 for estimates of ≤1,000 to reflect model uncertainty.
Estimates with an RSE of 30%–50% are preceded by an asterisk (*) and should be used with caution because they do not meet the standard of reliability.
Estimates with an RSE of >50% are not shown and are replaced by an ellipsis (…).
aReported to the National HIV Surveillance System.
bEstimates should be interpreted with caution because the jurisdiction does not have laws requiring complete reporting of laboratory data or has incomplete reporting. Areas without laws: New Jersey and Pennsylvania (excluding Philadelphia County). Areas with incomplete reporting: Arizona, Nevada (2017 only), and Puerto Rico.

Table 3a. Diagnoses of HIV infection among persons aged ≥13 years, by selected characteristics, 2017 and 2018—United States
2017 2018
Total No. Total No.
Gender
Male 30,488 29,753
Female 7,268 7,063
Transgender male-to-femalea 549 553
Transgender female-to-malea 33 47
Additional gender identityb 13 12
Age at infection (yr)
13–24 8,273 7,817
25–34 13,376 13,355
35–44 7,267 7,196
45–54 5,604 5,294
≥55 3,831 3,766
Race/ethnicity
American Indian/Alaska Native 208 186
Asian 937 871
Black/African American 16,460 15,994
Hispanic/Latinoc 9,773 9,811
Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander 52 66
White 9,804 9,557
Multiple races 1,117 943
Transmission categoryd
Male-to-male sexual contact 25,455 24,669
Injection drug use
Male 1,308 1,408
Female 1,063 1,056
Male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use 1,383 1,361
Heterosexual contacte
Male 2,871 2,845
Female 6,192 6,014
Otherf
Male 33 35
Female 46 40
Region of residenceg
Northeast 5,988 5,573
Midwest 5,088 4,921
South 19,658 19,422
West 7,617 7,512
Total 38,351 37,428

a“Transgender male-to-female” includes individuals who were assigned “male” sex at birth but have ever identified as “female” gender. “Transgender female-to-male” includes individuals who were assigned “female” sex at birth but have ever identified as “male” gender.
bAdditional gender identity examples include “bigender,” “gender queer,” and “two-spirit.”
cHispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
dData have been statistically adjusted to account for missing transmission category, therefore values may not sum to column subtotals and total. Data presented based on sex at birth and may include transgender persons.
eHeterosexual contact with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection.
fIncludes hemophilia, blood transfusion, perinatal exposure, and risk factor not reported or not identified.
gData are based on residence at time of diagnosis of HIV infection.

Table 3b. Diagnoses of HIV infection among persons aged ≥13 years, by selected characteristics, 2017 and 2018—United States and 6 dependent areas
2017 2018
Total No. Total No.
Gender
Male 30,855 30,125
Female 7,362 7,143
Transgender male-to-femalea 551 554
Transgender female-to-malea 33 47
Additional gender identityb 13 12
Age at infection (yr)
13–24 8,350 7,891
25–34 13,504 13,491
35–44 7,357 7,275
45–54 5,697 5,389
≥55 3,906 3,835
Race/ethnicity
American Indian/Alaska Native 208 186
Asian 940 875
Black/African American 16,464 16,002
Hispanic/Latinoc 10,222 10,246
Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander 55 68
White 9,807 9,560
Multiple races 1,118 944
Transmission categoryd
Male-to-male sexual contact 25,693 24,933
Injection drug use
Male 1,342 1,434
Female 1,072 1,058
Male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use 1,395 1,372
Heterosexual contacte
Male 2,956 2,916
Female 6,276 6,092
Otherf
Male 33 35
Female 46 40
Region of residenceg
Northeast 5,988 5,573
Midwest 5,088 4,921
South 19,658 19,422
West 7,617 7,512
U.S. dependent areas 463 453
Total 38,814 37,881

a“Transgender male-to-female” includes individuals who were assigned “male” sex at birth but have ever identified as “female” gender. “Transgender female-to-male” includes individuals who were assigned “female” sex at birth but have ever identified as “male” gender.
bAdditional gender identity examples include “bigender,” “gender queer,” and “two-spirit.”
cHispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
dData have been statistically adjusted to account for missing transmission category, therefore values may not sum to column subtotals and total. Data presented based on sex at birth and may include transgender persons.
eHeterosexual contact with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection.
fIncludes hemophilia, blood transfusion, perinatal exposure, and risk factor not reported or not identified.
gData are based on residence at time of diagnosis of HIV infection.

Table 3c. Diagnoses of HIV infection among persons aged ≥13 years, by area of residence, 2017 and 2018—United States and 6 dependent areas
2017 2018
Area of residence Total No. Total No.
Alabama 649 607
Alaska 29 23
Arizona 725 759
Arkansas 288 281
California 4,878 4,712
Colorado 438 399
Connecticut 274 258
Delaware 126 92
District of Columbia 313 275
Florida 4,555 4,573
Georgia 2,588 2,501
Hawaii 77 70
Idaho 46 37
Illinois 1,363 1,361
Indiana 517 512
Iowa 126 115
Kansas 120 155
Kentucky 364 372
Louisiana 1,002 972
Maine 29 30
Maryland 1,024 996
Massachusetts 600 650
Michigan 776 716
Minnesota 275 288
Mississippi 428 477
Missouri 504 447
Montana 31 23
Nebraska 88 79
Nevada 493 503
New Hampshire 33 38
New Jersey 1,121 1,025
New Mexico 140 122
New York 2,731 2,456
North Carolina 1,299 1,187
North Dakota 37 36
Ohio 982 977
Oklahoma 300 280
Oregon 203 229
Pennsylvania 1,096 1,023
Rhode Island 84 75
South Carolina 709 715
South Dakota 39 29
Tennessee 720 762
Texas 4,354 4,388
Utah 114 119
Vermont 20 18
Virginia 863 858
Washington 433 504
West Virginia 76 86
Wisconsin 261 206
Wyoming 10 12
Subtotal 38,351 37,428
U.S. dependent areas
American Samoa 0 0
Guam 6 7
Northern Mariana Islands 1 1
Puerto Rico 448 436
Republic of Palau 0 0
U.S. Virgin Islands 8 9
Subtotal 463 453
Total 38,814 37,881

Note. Data are based on residence at time of diagnosis of HIV infection.

Table 3d. Diagnoses of HIV infection among persons aged ≥13 years, by area of residence, 2017 and 2018—Ending the HIV Epidemic Phase I jurisdictions
2017 2018
Area of residence Total No. Total No.
Arizona
Maricopa County 494 535
California
Alameda County 204 198
Los Angeles County 1,799 1,690
Orange County 312 286
Riverside County 273 257
Sacramento County 170 156
San Bernardino County 253 274
San Diego County 414 378
San Francisco County 244 237
District of Columbia 313 275
Florida
Broward County 671 626
Duval County 300 274
Hillsborough County 300 301
Miami-Dade County 1,141 1,177
Orange County 461 464
Palm Beach County 289 284
Pinellas County 164 175
Georgia
Cobb County 153 153
DeKalb County 364 362
Fulton County 618 605
Gwinnett County 173 151
Illinois
Cook County 978 970
Indiana
Marion County 226 205
Louisiana
East Baton Rouge Parish 166 178
Orleans Parish 186 179
Maryland
Baltimore City 238 231
Montgomery County 162 126
Prince George’s County 309 308
Massachusetts
Suffolk County 159 147
Michigan
Wayne County 325 300
Nevada
Clark County 444 450
New Jersey
Essex County 313 263
Hudson County 164 161
New York
Bronx County 506 447
Kings County 630 548
New York County 396 371
Queens County 431 411
North Carolina
Mecklenburg County 269 242
Ohio
Cuyahoga County 148 149
Franklin County 222 194
Hamilton County 187 184
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia County 498 442
Puerto Rico
San Juan Municipio 110 104
Tennessee
Shelby County 259 303
Texas
Bexar County 348 325
Dallas County 815 785
Harris County 1,100 1,199
Tarrant County 303 275
Travis County 210 189
Washington
King County 210 292

Note. Data are based on residence at time of diagnosis of HIV infection.

Table 4a. Linkage to HIV medical care within 1 month after HIV diagnosis during 2017, among persons aged ≥13 years, by selected characteristics—41 states and the District of Columbia
≥1 CD4 or VL tests No CD4 or VL test
Total No. No. % No. %
Gender
Male 27,111 21,071 77.7 6,040 22.3
Female 6,437 5,032 78.2 1,405 21.8
Transgender male-to-femalea 488 375 76.8 113 23.2
Transgender female-to-malea 29 27 93.1 2 6.9
Additional gender identityb 13 12 92.3 1 7.7
Age at diagnosis (yr)
13–24 7,388 5,514 74.6 1,874 25.4
25–34 11,916 9,143 76.7 2,773 23.3
35–44 6,455 5,116 79.3 1,339 20.7
45–54 4,939 4,002 81.0 937 19.0
≥55 3,380 2,742 81.1 638 18.9
Race/ethnicity
American Indian/Alaska Native 156 130 83.3 26 16.7
Asian 843 684 81.1 159 18.9
Black/African American 14,854 11,180 75.3 3,674 24.7
Hispanic/Latinoc 8,677 6,803 78.4 1,874 21.6
Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander 41 33 80.5 8 19.5
White 8,478 6,864 81.0 1,614 19.0
Multiple races 1,029 823 80.0 206 20.0
Transmission categoryd
Male-to-male sexual contact 22,763 17,766 78.0 4,997 22.0
Injection drug use
Male 1,076 820 76.3 255 23.7
Female 901 685 75.9 217 24.1
Male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use 1,191 889 74.6 302 25.4
Heterosexual contacte
Male 2,553 1,959 76.7 595 23.3
Female 5,527 4,342 78.6 1,185 21.4
Totalf 34,078 26,517 77.8 7,561 22.2

Abbreviations: CD4, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (cells/µL) or percentage; VL, viral load (copies/mL); CDC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [footnotes only].
Note. Data are based on residence at diagnosis. Linkage to HIV medical care was measured by documentation of ≥1 CD4 or VL tests ≤1 month after HIV diagnosis. Data not provided for jurisdictions that do not have laws requiring reporting of all CD4 and viral loads or for areas with incomplete reporting of laboratory data to CDC. Areas without laws: Idaho, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Areas with incomplete lab reporting: Arizona, Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky, Nevada, Puerto Rico, and Vermont.
a“Transgender male-to-female” includes individuals who were assigned “male” sex at birth but have ever identified as “female” gender. “Transgender female-to-male” includes individuals who were assigned “female” sex at birth but have ever identified as “male” gender.
bAdditional gender identity examples include “bigender,” “gender queer,” and “two-spirit.”
cHispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
dData have been statistically adjusted to account for missing transmission category; therefore, values may not sum to column total. Data presented based on sex at birth and may include transgender persons.
eHeterosexual contact with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection.
fIncludes persons whose infection was attributed to hemophilia, blood transfusion, or perinatal exposure or whose risk factor was not reported or not identified.

Table 4b. Linkage to HIV medical care within 1 month after HIV diagnosis during 2017, among persons aged ≥13 years, by area of residence—41 states and the District of Columbia
≥1 CD4 or VL tests No CD4 or VL test
Area of residence Total No. No. % No. %
Alabama 649 499 76.9 150 23.1
Alaska 29 28 96.6 1 3.4
California 4,878 3,624 74.3 1,254 25.7
Colorado 438 369 84.2 69 15.8
Connecticut 274 229 83.6 45 16.4
Delaware 126 108 85.7 18 14.3
District of Columbia 313 249 79.6 64 20.4
Florida 4,555 3,537 77.7 1,018 22.3
Georgia 2,588 1,975 76.3 613 23.7
Hawaii 77 66 85.7 11 14.3
Illinois 1,363 1,115 81.8 248 18.2
Indiana 517 349 67.5 168 32.5
Iowa 126 115 91.3 11 8.7
Louisiana 1,002 792 79.0 210 21.0
Maine 29 27 93.1 2 6.9
Maryland 1,024 872 85.2 152 14.8
Massachusetts 600 524 87.3 76 12.7
Michigan 776 642 82.7 134 17.3
Minnesota 275 241 87.6 34 12.4
Mississippi 428 301 70.3 127 29.7
Missouri 504 364 72.2 140 27.8
Montana 31 27 87.1 4 12.9
Nebraska 88 69 78.4 19 21.6
New Hampshire 33 27 81.8 6 18.2
New Mexico 140 117 83.6 23 16.4
New York 2,731 2,308 84.5 423 15.5
North Carolina 1,299 977 75.2 322 24.8
North Dakota 37 33 89.2 4 10.8
Ohio 982 818 83.3 164 16.7
Oklahoma 300 203 67.7 97 32.3
Oregon 203 160 78.8 43 21.2
Rhode Island 84 77 91.7 7 8.3
South Carolina 709 603 85.0 106 15.0
South Dakota 39 34 87.2 5 12.8
Tennessee 720 438 60.8 282 39.2
Texas 4,354 3,157 72.5 1,197 27.5
Utah 114 104 91.2 10 8.8
Virginia 863 656 76.0 207 24.0
Washington 433 397 91.7 36 8.3
West Virginia 76 59 77.6 17 22.4
Wisconsin 261 218 83.5 43 16.5
Wyoming 10 9 90.0 1 10.0
Total 34,078 26,517 77.8 7,561 22.2

Abbreviations: CD4, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (cells/µL) or percentage; VL, viral load (copies/mL); CDC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [footnotes only].
Note. Data are based on residence at diagnosis. Linkage to HIV medical care was measured by documentation of ≥1 CD4 or VL tests ≤1 month after HIV diagnosis. Data not provided for states and associated counties that do not have laws requiring reporting of all CD4 and viral loads, or that have incomplete reporting of laboratory data to CDC. Areas without laws: Idaho, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Areas with incomplete lab reporting: Arizona, Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky, Nevada, Puerto Rico, and Vermont.

Table 4c. Linkage to HIV medical care within 1 month after HIV diagnosis during 2017, among persons aged ≥13 years, by area of residence—Ending the HIV Epidemic Phase I jurisdictions
≥1 CD4 or VL tests No CD4 or VL test
Area of residence Total No. No. % No. %
California
Alameda County 204 175 85.8 29 14.2
Los Angeles County 1,799 1,257 69.9 542 30.1
Orange County 312 240 76.9 72 23.1
Riverside County 273 206 75.5 67 24.5
Sacramento County 170 142 83.5 28 16.5
San Bernardino County 253 166 65.6 87 34.4
San Diego County 414 314 75.8 100 24.2
San Francisco County 244 206 84.4 38 15.6
District of Columbia 313 249 79.6 64 20.4
Florida
Broward County 671 541 80.6 130 19.4
Duval County 300 211 70.3 89 29.7
Hillsborough County 300 229 76.3 71 23.7
Miami-Dade County 1,141 925 81.1 216 18.9
Orange County 461 325 70.5 136 29.5
Palm Beach County 289 220 76.1 69 23.9
Pinellas County 164 124 75.6 40 24.4
Georgia
Cobb County 153 125 81.7 28 18.3
DeKalb County 364 276 75.8 88 24.2
Fulton County 618 493 79.8 125 20.2
Gwinnett County 173 131 75.7 42 24.3
Illinois
Cook County 978 801 81.9 177 18.1
Indiana
Marion County 226 154 68.1 72 31.9
Louisiana
East Baton Rouge Parish 166 134 80.7 32 19.3
Orleans Parish 186 152 81.7 34 18.3
Maryland
Baltimore City 238 200 84.0 38 16.0
Montgomery County 162 129 79.6 33 20.4
Prince George’s County 309 271 87.7 38 12.3
Massachusetts
Suffolk County 159 140 88.1 19 11.9
Michigan
Wayne County 325 262 80.6 63 19.4
New York
Bronx County 506 423 83.6 83 16.4
Kings County 630 536 85.1 94 14.9
New York County 396 337 85.1 59 14.9
Queens County 431 365 84.7 66 15.3
North Carolina
Mecklenburg County 269 192 71.4 77 28.6
Ohio
Cuyahoga County 148 127 85.8 21 14.2
Franklin County 222 193 86.9 29 13.1
Hamilton County 187 160 85.6 27 14.4
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia County 498 445 89.4 53 10.6
Tennessee
Shelby County 259 163 62.9 96 37.1
Texas
Bexar County 348 239 68.7 109 31.3
Dallas County 815 612 75.1 203 24.9
Harris County 1,100 802 72.9 298 27.1
Tarrant County 303 216 71.3 87 28.7
Travis County 210 148 70.5 62 29.5
Washington
King County 210 196 93.3 14 6.7

Abbreviations: CD4, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (cells/µL) or percentage; VL, viral load (copies/mL); CDC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [footnotes only].
Note. Data are based on residence at diagnosis. Linkage to HIV medical care was measured by documentation of ≥1 CD4 or VL tests ≤1 month after HIV diagnosis. Data not provided for states and associated jurisdictions that do not have laws requiring reporting of all CD4 and viral loads, or that have incomplete reporting of laboratory data to CDC. Areas without laws: New Jersey and Pennsylvania (excluding Philadelphia County). Areas with incomplete lab reporting: Arizona, Nevada, and Puerto Rico.

Table 4d. Linkage to HIV medical care within 1 month after HIV diagnosis during 2018, among persons aged ≥13 years, by selected characteristics—41 states and the District of Columbia
≥1 CD4 or VL tests No CD4 or VL test
Total No. No. % No. %
Gender
Male 26,657 21,392 80.2 5,265 19.8
Female 6,299 5,029 79.8 1,270 20.2
Transgender male-to-femalea 492 396 80.5 96 19.5
Transgender female-to-malea 42 32 76.2 10 23.8
Additional gender identityb 10 9 90.0 1 10.0
Age at diagnosis (yr)
13–24 6,997 5,400 77.2 1,597 22.8
25–34 11,998 9,540 79.5 2,458 20.5
35–44 6,452 5,307 82.3 1,145 17.7
45–54 4,719 3,851 81.6 868 18.4
≥55 3,334 2,760 82.8 574 17.2
Race/ethnicity
American Indian/Alaska Native 140 109 77.9 31 22.1
Asian 786 662 84.2 124 15.8
Black/African American 14,558 11,226 77.1 3,332 22.9
Hispanic/Latinoc 8,776 7,230 82.4 1,546 17.6
Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander 57 50 87.7 7 12.3
White 8,323 6,876 82.6 1,447 17.4
Multiple races 860 705 82.0 155 18.0
Transmission categoryd
Male-to-male sexual contact 22,237 17,963 80.8 4,273 19.2
Injection drug use
Male 1,150 875 76.1 275 23.9
Female 898 679 75.6 219 24.4
Male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use 1,210 963 79.6 247 20.4
Heterosexual contacte
Male 2,533 1,973 77.9 561 22.1
Female 5,411 4,355 80.5 1,056 19.5
Totalf 33,500 26,858 80.2 6,642 19.8

Abbreviations: CD4, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (cells/µL) or percentage; VL, viral load (copies/mL); CDC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [footnotes only].
Note. Data are based on residence at diagnosis. Linkage to HIV medical care was measured by documentation of ≥1 CD4 or VL tests ≤1 month after HIV diagnosis. Data not provided for jurisdictions that do not have laws requiring reporting of all CD4 and viral loads or for areas with incomplete reporting of laboratory data to CDC. Areas without laws: Idaho, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Areas with incomplete lab reporting: Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Kansas, Kentucky, Puerto Rico, and Vermont.
a“Transgender male-to-female” includes individuals who were assigned “male” sex at birth but have ever identified as “female” gender. “Transgender female-to-male” includes individuals who were assigned “female” sex at birth but have ever identified as “male” gender.
bAdditional gender identity examples include “bigender,” “gender queer,” and “two-spirit.”
cHispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
dData have been statistically adjusted to account for missing transmission category; therefore, values may not sum to column total. Data presented based on sex at birth and may include transgender persons.
eHeterosexual contact with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection.
fIncludes persons whose infection was attributed to hemophilia, blood transfusion, or perinatal exposure or whose risk factor was not reported or not identified. Data not displayed because the numbers were too small to be meaningful.

Table 4e. Linkage to HIV medical care within 1 month after HIV diagnosis during 2018, among persons aged ≥13 years, by area of residence—41 states and the District of Columbia
≥1 CD4 or VL tests No CD4 or VL test
Area of residence Total No. No. % No. %
Alabama 607 488 80.4 119 19.6
Alaska 23 20 87.0 3 13.0
California 4,712 3,744 79.5 968 20.5
Colorado 399 332 83.2 67 16.8
Delaware 92 74 80.4 18 19.6
District of Columbia 275 231 84.0 44 16.0
Florida 4,573 3,766 82.4 807 17.6
Georgia 2,501 1,965 78.6 536 21.4
Hawaii 70 60 85.7 10 14.3
Illinois 1,361 1,086 79.8 275 20.2
Indiana 512 350 68.4 162 31.6
Iowa 115 107 93.0 8 7.0
Louisiana 972 767 78.9 205 21.1
Maine 30 29 96.7 1 3.3
Maryland 996 814 81.7 182 18.3
Massachusetts 650 562 86.5 88 13.5
Michigan 716 590 82.4 126 17.6
Minnesota 288 234 81.2 54 18.8
Mississippi 477 357 74.8 120 25.2
Missouri 447 316 70.7 131 29.3
Montana 23 21 91.3 2 8.7
Nebraska 79 64 81.0 15 19.0
Nevada 503 441 87.7 62 12.3
New Hampshire 38 37 97.4 1 2.6
New Mexico 122 102 83.6 20 16.4
New York 2,456 2,121 86.4 335 13.6
North Carolina 1,187 932 78.5 255 21.5
North Dakota 36 30 83.3 6 16.7
Ohio 977 785 80.3 192 19.7
Oklahoma 280 196 70.0 84 30.0
Oregon 229 188 82.1 41 17.9
Rhode Island 75 68 90.7 7 9.3
South Carolina 715 617 86.3 98 13.7
South Dakota 29 26 89.7 3 10.3
Tennessee 762 559 73.4 203 26.6
Texas 4,388 3,307 75.4 1,081 24.6
Utah 119 99 83.2 20 16.8
Virginia 858 659 76.8 199 23.2
Washington 504 457 90.7 47 9.3
West Virginia 86 70 81.4 16 18.6
Wisconsin 206 178 86.4 28 13.6
Wyoming 12 9 75.0 3 25.0
Total 33,500 26,858 80.2 6,642 19.8

Abbreviations: CD4, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (cells/µL) or percentage; VL, viral load (copies/mL); CDC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [footnotes only].
Note. Data are based on residence at diagnosis. Linkage to HIV medical care was measured by documentation of ≥1 CD4 or VL tests ≤1 month after HIV diagnosis. Data not provided for states and associated counties that do not have laws requiring reporting of all CD4 and viral loads, or that have incomplete reporting of laboratory data to CDC. Areas without laws: Idaho, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Areas with incomplete lab reporting: Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Kansas, Kentucky, Puerto Rico, and Vermont.

Table 4f. Linkage to HIV medical care within 1 month after HIV diagnosis during 2018, among persons aged ≥13 years, by area of residence—Ending the HIV Epidemic Phase I jurisdictions
≥1 CD4 or VL tests No CD4 or VL test
Area of residence Total No. No. % No. %
California
Alameda County 198 164 82.8 34 17.2
Los Angeles County 1690 1,286 76.1 404 23.9
Orange County 286 223 78.0 63 22.0
Riverside County 257 214 83.3 43 16.7
Sacramento County 156 133 85.3 23 14.7
San Bernardino County 274 197 71.9 77 28.1
San Diego County 378 317 83.9 61 16.1
San Francisco County 237 219 92.4 18 7.6
District of Columbia 275 231 84.0 44 16.0
Florida
Broward County 626 527 84.2 99 15.8
Duval County 274 204 74.5 70 25.5
Hillsborough County 301 248 82.4 53 17.6
Miami-Dade County 1,177 994 84.5 183 15.5
Orange County 464 356 76.7 108 23.3
Palm Beach County 284 232 81.7 52 18.3
Pinellas County 175 151 86.3 24 13.7
Georgia
Cobb County 153 118 77.1 35 22.9
DeKalb County 362 282 77.9 80 22.1
Fulton County 605 488 80.7 117 19.3
Gwinnett County 151 115 76.2 36 23.8
Illinois
Cook County 970 777 80.1 193 19.9
Indiana
Marion County 205 132 64.4 73 35.6
Louisiana
East Baton Rouge Parish 178 153 86.0 25 14.0
Orleans Parish 179 139 77.7 40 22.3
Maryland
Baltimore City 231 181 78.4 50 21.6
Montgomery County 126 108 85.7 18 14.3
Prince George’s County 308 248 80.5 60 19.5
Massachusetts
Suffolk County 147 134 91.2 13 8.8
Michigan
Wayne County 300 245 81.7 55 18.3
Nevada
Clark County 450 394 87.6 56 12.4
New York
Bronx County 447 388 86.8 59 13.2
Kings County 548 481 87.8 67 12.2
New York County 371 323 87.1 48 12.9
Queens County 411 371 90.3 40 9.7
North Carolina
Mecklenburg County 242 191 78.9 51 21.1
Ohio
Cuyahoga County 149 127 85.2 22 14.8
Franklin County 194 165 85.1 29 14.9
Hamilton County 184 144 78.3 40 21.7
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia County 442 383 86.7 59 13.3
Tennessee
Shelby County 303 224 73.9 79 26.1
Texas
Bexar County 325 223 68.6 102 31.4
Dallas County 785 584 74.4 201 25.6
Harris County 1,199 886 73.9 313 26.1
Tarrant County 275 209 76.0 66 24.0
Travis County 189 151 79.9 38 20.1
Washington
King County 292 266 91.1 26 8.9

Abbreviations: CD4, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (cells/µL) or percentage; VL, viral load (copies/mL); CDC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [footnotes only].
Note. Data are based on residence at diagnosis. Linkage to HIV medical care was measured by documentation of ≥1 CD4 or VL tests ≤1 month after HIV diagnosis. Data not provided for states and associated jurisdictions that do not have laws requiring reporting of all CD4 and viral loads, or that have incomplete reporting of laboratory data to CDC. Areas without laws: New Jersey and Pennsylvania (excluding Philadelphia County). Areas with incomplete lab reporting: Arizona and Puerto Rico.

Table 5a. HIV viral suppression during 2017 among persons aged ≥13 years with HIV infection diagnosed by year-end 2016 and alive at year-end 2017, by selected characteristics—41 states and the District of Columbia
Persons alive at year-end 2017 VL <200 copies/mL
No. No. %
Gender
Male 643,720 410,459 63.8
Female 200,524 122,524 61.1
Transgender male-to-femalea 8,164 5,163 63.2
Transgender female-to-malea 301 188 62.5
Additional gender identityb 127 80 63.0
Age at year-end 2016 (yr)
13–24 31,243 17,830 57.1
25–34 131,682 76,975 58.5
35–44 166,076 100,708 60.6
45–54 264,667 172,238 65.1
≥55 259,168 170,663 65.9
Race/ethnicity
American Indian/Alaska Native 2,063 1,299 63.0
Asianc 12,005 8,248 68.7
Black/African American 354,480  204,509 57.7
Hispanic/Latinod 189,388 118,407 62.5
Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander 692 454 65.6
White 253,048 177,085 70.0
Multiple races 40,502 28,349 70.0
Transmission categorye
Male-to-male sexual contact 475,435 314,269 66.1
Injection drug use
Male 56,641 29,536 52.1
Female 40,676 23,851 58.6
Male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use 48,167 30,602 63.5
Heterosexual contactf
Male 65,307 37,867 58.0
Female 154,080 95,665 62.1
Otherg
Male 6,438 3,414 53.0
Female 6,092 3,209 52.7
Totalh 852,836 538,414 63.1

Abbreviations: VL, viral load (copies/mL); CD4, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (cells/µL) or percentage [footnotes only]; CDC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [footnotes only].
Note. Data are based on address of residence as of December 31, 2017 (i.e., most recent known address). A VL test result of <200 copies/mL indicates HIV viral suppression. VL test results are from the most recent test during 2017. Data not provided for states and associated counties that lack laws requiring reporting of all CD4 and viral loads or that have incomplete reporting of laboratory data to CDC. Areas without laws: Idaho, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Areas with incomplete lab reporting: Arizona, Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky, Nevada, Puerto Rico, and Vermont.
a“Transgender male-to-female” includes individuals who were assigned “male” sex at birth but have ever identified as “female” gender. “Transgender female-to-male” includes individuals who were assigned “female” sex at birth but have ever identified as “male” gender.
bAdditional gender identity examples include “bigender,” “gender queer,” and “two-spirit.”
cIncludes Asian/Pacific Islander legacy cases.
dHispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
eData have been statistically adjusted to account for missing transmission category; therefore, values may not sum to column total. Data presented based on sex at birth and may include transgender persons.
fHeterosexual contact with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection.
gIncludes persons whose infection was attributed to hemophilia, blood transfusion, or perinatal exposure or whose risk factor was not reported or not identified.
hIncludes 658 persons of unknown race/ethnicity.

Table 5b. HIV viral suppression during 2017 among persons aged ≥13 years with HIV infection diagnosed by year-end 2016 and alive at year-end 2017, by area of residence—41 states and the District of Columbia
Persons alive at year-end 2017 VL <200 copies/mL
Area of residence No. No. %
Alabama 12,403 7,886 63.6
Alaska 685 541 79.0
California 123,480 82,379 66.7
Colorado 11,764 6,960 59.2
Connecticut 10,065 6,729 66.9
Delaware 3,162 2,145 67.8
District of Columbia 13,975 7,821 56.0
Florida 104,246 66,619 63.9
Georgia 50,224 29,466 58.7
Hawaii 2,413 1,668 69.1
Illinois 33,658 18,249 54.2
Indiana 10,597 6,562 61.9
Iowa 2,544 2,025 79.6
Louisiana 19,393 12,567 64.8
Maine 1,522 1,203 79.0
Maryland 31,627 18,276 57.8
Massachusetts 19,819 14,033 70.8
Michigan 14,894 10,758 72.2
Minnesota 7,993 5,547 69.4
Mississippi 8,921 4,418 49.5
Missouri 11,796 7,820 66.3
Montana 582 463 79.6
Nebraska 2,027 1,311 64.7
New Hampshire 1,149 812 70.7
New Mexico 3,253 2,238 68.8
New York 123,484 78,126 63.3
North Carolina 29,610 18,752 63.3
North Dakota 374 290 77.5
Ohio 20,896 11,449 54.8
Oklahoma 5,742 3,421 59.6
Oregon 6,662 5,256 78.9
Rhode Island 2,461 1,891 76.8
South Carolina 16,152 10,722 66.4
South Dakota 532 296 55.6
Tennessee 15,973 9,199 57.6
Texas 83,827 51,385 61.3
Utah 2,631 1,651 62.8
Virginia 21,599 11,748 54.4
Washington 12,739 10,035 78.8
West Virginia 1,723 1,020 59.2
Wisconsin 5,927 4,436 74.8
Wyoming 312 241 77.2
Total 852,836 538,414 63.1

Abbreviations: VL, viral load (copies/mL); CD4, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (cells/µL) or percentage [footnotes only]; CDC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [footnotes only].
Note. Data are based on address of residence as of December 31, 2017 (i.e., most recent known address). A VL test result of <200 copies/mL indicates HIV viral suppression. VL test results are from the most recent test during 2017. Data not provided for states and associated counties that do not have laws requiring reporting of all CD4 and viral loads, or that have incomplete reporting of laboratory data to CDC. Areas without laws: Idaho, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Areas with incomplete lab reporting: Arizona, Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky, Nevada, Puerto Rico, and Vermont.

Table 5c. HIV viral suppression during 2017 among persons aged ≥13 years with HIV infection diagnosed by year-end 2016 and alive at year-end 2017, by area of residence—Ending the HIV Epidemic Phase I jurisdictions
Persons alive at year-end 2017 VL <200 copies/mL
Area of residence No. No. %
California
Alameda County  5,679 4,175 73.5
Los Angeles County  46,844 29,801 63.6
Orange County  6,486 4,047 62.4
Riverside County  8,243 6,358 77.1
Sacramento County  4,014 2,903 72.3
San Bernardino County  3,857 2,136 55.4
San Diego County  12,552 7,799 62.1
San Francisco County  12,070 9,283 76.9
District of Columbia  13,975 7,821 56.0
Florida
Broward County  18,513 12,499 67.5
Duval County  5,607 3,156 56.3
Hillsborough County  6,357 4,194 66.0
Miami-Dade County  24,869 14,919 60.0
Orange County  7,885 5,065 64.2
Palm Beach County  7,545 4,459 59.1
Pinellas County  4,285 2,939 68.6
Georgia
Cobb County  2,853 1,787 62.6
DeKalb County  7,833 4,846 61.9
Fulton County  13,748 8,209 59.7
Gwinnett County  2,578 1,648 63.9
Illinois
Cook County  23,983 13,093 54.6
Indiana
Marion County  4,313 2,995 69.4
Louisiana
East Baton Rouge Parish  3,671 2,458 67.0
Orleans Parish  4,649 3,088 66.4
Maryland
Baltimore City   9,995 5,413 54.2
Montgomery County  3,193 1,612 50.5
Prince George’s County 5,678 3,228 56.9
Massachusetts
Suffolk County  5,610 3,951 70.4
Michigan
Wayne County  6,122 4,172 68.1
New York
Bronx County  26,861 16,690 62.1
Kings County  25,672 16,305 63.5
New York County  26,680 16,502 61.9
Queens County  15,230 9,659 63.4
North Carolina
Mecklenburg County  5,428 3,524 64.9
Ohio
Cuyahoga County  4,481 2,112 47.1
Franklin County  4,557 2,854 62.6
Hamilton County  2,712 1,188 43.8
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia County  16,616 10,275 61.8
Tennessee
Shelby County  5,847 3,624 62.0
Texas
Bexar County  5,774 3,754 65.0
Dallas County  16,611 10,169 61.2
Harris County  23,776 14,231 59.9
Tarrant County  5,206 3,462 66.5
Travis County  4,505 3,416 75.8
Washington
King County 6,609 5,394 81.6

Abbreviations: VL, viral load (copies/mL); CD4, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (cells/µL) or percentage [footnotes only]; CDC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [footnotes only].
Note. Data are based on address of residence as of December 31, 2017 (i.e., most recent known address). A VL test result of <200 copies/mL indicates HIV viral suppression. VL test results are from the most recent test during 2017. Data not provided for states and associated counties that do not have laws requiring reporting of all CD4 and viral loads, or that have incomplete reporting of laboratory data to CDC. Areas without laws: New Jersey and Pennsylvania (excluding Philadelphia County). Areas with incomplete lab reporting: Arizona, Nevada (2017 only), and Puerto Rico.

Table 5d. HIV viral suppression during 2018 among persons aged ≥13 years with HIV infection diagnosed by year-end 2017 and alive at year-end 2018, by selected characteristics—41 states and the District of Columbia
Persons alive at year-end 2018 VL <200 copies/mL
No. No. %
Gender
Male 662,766 431,743 65.1
Female 202,366 127,475 63.0
Transgender male-to-femalea 8,625 5,643 65.4
Transgender female-to-malea 326 233 71.5
Additional gender identityb 147 101 68.7
Age at year-end 2017 (yr)
13–24 29,983 18,084 60.3
25–34 137,595 83,601 60.8
35–44 167,518 104,524 62.4
45–54 256,520 169,741 66.2
≥55 282,614 189,245 67.0
Race/ethnicity
American Indian/Alaska Native 2,234 1,429 64.0
Asianc 13,096 9,121 69.6
Black/African American 363,079    217,479 59.9
Hispanic/Latinod 195,295 124,483 63.7
Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander 749 490 65.4
White 258,318 182,545 70.7
Multiple races 40,800 29,585 72.5
Transmission categorye
Male-to-male sexual contact 495,978 333,757 67.3
Injection drug use
Male 54,647 29,095 53.2
Female 39,746 24,001 60.4
Male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use 48,506 31,622 65.2
Heterosexual contactf
Male 65,946 39,468 59.8
Female 156,762 100,284 64.0
Otherg
Male 6,437 3,526 54.8
Female 6,208 3,440 55.4
Totalh 874,230 565,195 64.7

Abbreviations: VL, viral load (copies/mL); CD4, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (cells/µL) or percentage [footnotes only]; CDC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [footnotes only].
Note. Data for the year 2018 are preliminary and based on death data reported to CDC as of December 2019. Data are based on address of residence as of December 31, 2018 (i.e., most recent known address). A VL test result of <200 copies/mL indicates HIV viral suppression. VL test results are from the most recent test during 2018. Data not provided for states and associated counties that do not have laws requiring reporting of all CD4 and viral loads, or that have incomplete reporting of laboratory data to CDC. Areas without laws: Idaho, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Areas with incomplete lab reporting: Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Kansas, Kentucky, Puerto Rico, and Vermont.
a“Transgender male-to-female” includes individuals who were assigned “male” sex at birth but have ever identified as “female” gender. “Transgender female-to-male” includes individuals who were assigned “female” sex at birth but have ever identified as “male” gender.
bAdditional gender identity examples include “bigender,” “gender queer,” and “two-spirit.”
cIncludes Asian/Pacific Islander legacy cases.
dHispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
eData have been statistically adjusted to account for missing transmission category; therefore, values may not sum to column total. Data presented based on sex at birth and may include transgender persons.
fHeterosexual contact with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection.
gIncludes persons whose infection was attributed to hemophilia, blood transfusion, or perinatal exposure or whose risk factor was not reported or not identified.
hIncludes 659 persons of unknown race/ethnicity.

Table 5e. HIV viral suppression during 2018 among persons aged ≥13 years with HIV infection diagnosed by year-end 2017 and alive at year-end 2018, by area of residence—41 states and the District of Columbia
Persons alive at year-end 2018 VL <200 copies/mL
Area of residence No. No. %
Alabamaa 12,969 8,550 65.9
Alaska 684 530 77.5
California 126,348 84,492 66.9
Colorado 12,256 7,347 59.9
Delaware 3,226 2,343 72.6
District of Columbia 13,918 7,778 55.9
Florida 106,456 70,002 65.8
Georgia 52,147 31,083 59.6
Hawaii 2,366 1,716 72.5
Illinois 34,458 19,710 57.2
Indiana 10,998 6,842 62.2
Iowa 2,678 2,156 80.5
Louisiana 19,960 13,345 66.9
Maine 1,561 1,228 78.7
Maryland 32,163 20,195 62.8
Massachusetts 20,080 14,196 70.7
Michigan 15,294 11,188 73.2
Minnesota 8,278 5,498 66.4
Mississippi 9,012 4,536 50.3
Missouri 12,176 7,746 63.6
Montana 619 507 81.9
Nebraska 2,095 1,383 66.0
Nevada 9,723 6,115 62.9
New Hampshire 1,219 902 74.0
New Mexico 3,462 2,467 71.3
New York 124,567 80,729 64.8
North Carolina 30,665 20,516 66.9
North Dakota 417 326 78.2
Ohio 21,458 12,625 58.8
Oklahomaa 5,970 3,528 59.1
Oregon 6,826 5,397 79.1
Rhode Island 2,519 1,988 78.9
South Carolinaa 16,706 11,401 68.2
South Dakota 581 338 58.2
Tennessee 16,601 10,580 63.7
Texas 87,350 54,218 62.1
Utah 2,811 1,910 67.9
Virginia 22,240 13,454 60.5
Washington 13,115 10,413 79.4
West Virginia 1,811 1,136 62.7
Wisconsin 6,114 4,525 74.0
Wyoming 333 256 76.9
Total 874,230 565,195 64.7

Abbreviations: VL, viral load (copies/mL); CD4, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (cells/µL) or percentage [footnotes only]; CDC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [footnotes only].
Note. Data for the year 2018 are preliminary and based on death data reported to CDC as of December 2019. Data are based on address of residence as of December 31, 2018 (i.e., most recent known address). A VL test result of <200 copies/mL indicates HIV viral suppression. VL test results are from the most recent test during 2018. Data not provided for states and associated counties that do not have laws requiring reporting of all CD4 and viral loads, or that have incomplete reporting of laboratory data to CDC. Areas without laws: Idaho, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Areas with incomplete lab reporting: Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Kansas, Kentucky, Puerto Rico, and Vermont.
aData should be interpreted with caution due to incomplete ascertainment of deaths that occurred during the year 2018.

Table 5f. HIV viral suppression during 2018 among persons aged ≥13 years with HIV infection diagnosed by year-end 2017 and alive at year-end 2018, by area of residence—Ending the HIV Epidemic Phase I jurisdictions
Persons alive at year-end 2018 VL <200 copies/mL
Area of residence No. No. %
California
Alameda County 5,856 4,342 74.1
Los Angeles County 47,773 29,992 62.8
Orange County 6,596 3,995 60.6
Riverside County 8,767 6,822 77.8
Sacramento County 4,124 3,004 72.8
San Bernardino County 4,193 2,407 57.4
San Diego County 12,747 8,070 63.3
San Francisco County 11,912 9,154 76.8
District of Columbia 13,918 7,778 55.9
Florida
Broward County 18,862 12,867 68.2
Duval County 5,819 3,496 60.1
Hillsborough County 6,566 4,539 69.1
Miami-Dade County 25,168 15,543 61.8
Orange County 8,157 5,418 66.4
Palm Beach County 7,641 4,704 61.6
Pinellas County 4,291 3,029 70.6
Georgia
Cobb County 3,008 1,874 62.3
DeKalb County 8,121 5,107 62.9
Fulton County 14,524 8,795 60.6
Gwinnett County 2,730 1,764 64.6
Illinois
Cook County 24,232 13,460 55.5
Indiana
Marion County 4,485 3,060 68.2
Louisiana
East Baton Rouge Parish 3,749 2,676 71.4
Orleans Parish 4,760 3,210 67.4
Maryland
Baltimore City 9,254 5,485 59.3
Montgomery County 3,457 1,873 54.2
Prince George’s County 5,535 3,358 60.7
Massachusetts
Suffolk County 5,587 3,983 71.3
Michigan
Wayne County 6,450 4,461 69.2
Nevada
Clark County 8,165 5,238 64.2
New York
Bronx County 27,127 17,903 66.0
Kings County 25,945 16,634 64.1
New York County 26,731 16,840 63.0
Queens County 15,463 9,740 63.0
North Carolina
Mecklenburg County 5,638 3,807 67.5
Ohio
Cuyahoga County 4,570 2,815 61.6
Franklin County 4,631 3,003 64.8
Hamilton County 2,778 1,290 46.4
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia County 16,525 10,295 62.3
Tennessee
Shelby County 5,922 3,805 64.3
Texas
Bexar County 5,985 3,883 64.9
Dallas County 17,345 10,705 61.7
Harris County 24,489 15,066 61.5
Tarrant County 5,453 3,546 65.0
Travis County 4,724 3,463 73.3
Washington
King County 6,619 5,453 82.4

Abbreviations: VL, viral load (copies/mL); CD4, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (cells/µL) or percentage [footnotes only]; CDC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [footnotes only].
Note. Data for the year 2018 are preliminary and based on death data reported to CDC as of December 2019. Data are based on address of residence as of December 31, 2018 (i.e., most recent known address). A VL test result of <200 copies/mL indicates HIV viral suppression. VL test results are from the most recent test during 2018. Data not provided for states and associated counties that do not have laws requiring reporting of all CD4 and viral loads, or that have incomplete reporting of laboratory data to CDC. Areas without laws: New Jersey and Pennsylvania (excluding Philadelphia County). Areas with incomplete lab reporting: Arizona and Puerto Rico.

Table 6a. Number of persons prescribed PrEP, number of persons with PrEP indications, and PrEP coverage in 2017, among persons aged ≥16 years, by selected characteristics—United States
Persons prescribed PrEPa Persons with PrEP indicationsb PrEP coveragec
No. No. %
Sex at birth
Male 142,409 986,476 14.4
Female 9,910 225,301 4.4
Age at infection (yr)
16–24 19,120 253,709 7.5
25–34 62,163 423,548 14.7
35–44 36,022 233,252 15.4
45–54 23,549 180,400 13.1
≥55 11,549 120,868 9.6
Race/ethnicityd
Asian/Other 6,730 n/a n/a
Black/African American 19,068 479,443 4.0
Hispanic/Latino 22,124 307,689 7.2
White 104,254 350,238 29.8
Total 152,403 1,211,777 12.6

Abbreviations: PrEP, preexposure prophylaxis; n/a, not available.
aEstimated using 2017 data from IQVIA pharmacy database.
bEstimated using 2017 data from National HIV Surveillance System, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and American Census Survey.
cPrEP coverage, reported as a percentage, was calculated as the number who have been prescribed PrEP divided by the estimated number of persons who had indications for PrEP.
dRace/ethnicity data were only available for 37% of persons prescribed PrEP in 2017. Number prescribed PrEP and PrEP coverage for race/ethnicity reported in the table were adjusted applying the distribution of records with known race/ethnicity to records with missing race/ethnicity.

Table 6b. Number of persons prescribed PrEP, number of persons with PrEP indications, and PrEP coverage in 2017, among persons aged ≥16 years, by area of residence—United States and Puerto Rico
Persons prescribed PrEPa Persons with PrEP indicationsb PrEP coveragec
Area of residence No. No. %
Alabama 949 11,421 8.3
Alaska 116 2,288 5.1
Arizona 2,219 26,829 8.3
Arkansas 421 4,878 8.6
California 26,343 165,645 15.9
Colorado 2,385 25,695 9.3
Connecticut 1,574 10,741 14.7
Delaware 265 4,600 5.8
District of Columbia 3,738 13,752 27.2
Florida 7,811 122,502 6.4
Georgia 4,313 40,504 10.6
Hawaii 427 5,490 7.8
Idaho 253 3,761 6.7
Illinois 10,252 53,854 19.0
Indiana 1,498 21,441 7.0
Iowa 789 4,209 18.7
Kansas 543 5,449 10.0
Kentucky 761 13,342 5.7
Louisiana 2,347 15,231 15.4
Maine 253 3,271 7.7
Maryland 2,690 27,978 9.6
Massachusetts 5,886 24,507 24.0
Michigan 2,195 28,239 7.8
Minnesota 2,499 23,417 10.7
Mississippi 447 5,072 8.8
Missouri 1,902 19,545 9.7
Montana 118 2,629 4.5
Nebraska 359 2,597 13.8
Nevada 1,019 10,904 9.3
New Hampshire 292 2,372 12.3
New Jersey 3,227 27,723 11.6
New Mexico 572 6,598 8.7
New York 22,572 74,419 30.3
North Carolina 2,337 33,179 7.0
North Dakota 108 1,119 9.7
Ohio 3,307 40,578 8.1
Oklahoma 531 10,820 4.9
Oregon 2,035 20,255 10.0
Pennsylvania 6,042 36,617 16.5
Puerto Rico 116 n/ad n/a
Rhode Island 608 4,449 13.7
South Carolina 662 10,249 6.5
South Dakota 56 934 6.0
Tennessee 1,685 22,898 7.4
Texas 11,048 123,538 8.9
Utah 1,019 6,831 14.9
Vermont 198 1,491 13.3
Virginia 2,038 33,424 6.1
Washington 6,707 35,255 19.0
West Virginia 221 3,706 6.0
Wisconsin 1,402 14,121 9.9
Wyoming 47 1,411 3.3

Abbreviations: PrEP, preexposure prophylaxis; n/a, not available.
aEstimated using 2017 data from IQVIA pharmacy database.
bEstimated using 2017 data from National HIV Surveillance System, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and American Census Survey.
cPrEP coverage, reported as a percentage, was calculated as the number who have been prescribed PrEP divided by the estimated number of persons who had indications for PrEP.
dPopulation-based data not available to make the estimate.

Table 6c. Number of persons prescribed PrEP, number of persons with PrEP indications, and PrEP coverage in 2017, among persons aged ≥16 years, by area of residence—Ending the HIV Epidemic Phase I jurisdictions
Persons prescribed PrEPa Persons with PrEP indicationsb PrEP coveragec
Area of residence No. No. %
Arizona
Maricopa County 1,804 17,228 10.5
California
Alameda County 1,359 7,296 18.6
Los Angeles County 9,011 41,822 21.5
Orange County 1,033 10,094 10.2
Riverside County 845 11,163 7.6
Sacramento County 542 5,381 10.1
San Bernardino County 377 12,132 3.1
San Diego County 2,326 15,150 15.4
San Francisco County 6,384 11,427 55.9
District of Columbia 3,738 13,752 27.2
Florida
Broward County 1,778 17,445 10.2
Duval County 230 8,533 2.7
Hillsborough County 471 12,578 3.7
Miami-Dade County 1,928 22,227 8.7
Orange County 929 15,027 6.2
Palm Beach County 337 7,647 4.4
Pinellas County 420 10,502 4.0
Georgia
Cobb County 254 3,396 7.5
DeKalb County 844 5,921 14.3
Fulton County 1,853 11,112 16.7
Gwinnett County 299 3,374 8.9
Illinois
Cook County 8,594 37,802 22.7
Indiana
Marion County 649 7,555 8.6
Louisiana
East Baton Rouge Parish 207 1,221 17.0
Orleans Parish 1,035 5,231 19.8
Maryland
Baltimore City 403 6,304 6.4
Montgomery County 543 5,551 9.8
Prince George’s County 435 3,640 12.0
Massachusetts
Suffolk County 1,969 6,025 32.7
Michigan
Wayne County 643 8,796 7.3
Nevada
Clark County 865 8,847 9.8
New Jersey
Essex County 400 5,134 7.8
Hudson County 616 4,333 14.2
New York
Bronx County 1,309 5,957 22.0
Kings County 4,589 13,551 33.9
New York County 9,609 14,657 65.6
Queens County 2,518 8,846 28.5
North Carolina
Mecklenburg County 583 8,499 6.9
Ohio
Cuyahoga County 578 7,416 7.8
Franklin County 1,207 12,302 9.8
Hamilton County 265 6,568 4.0
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia County 2,301 7,710 29.8
Puerto Rico
San Juan Municipio n/ad n/ae n/a
Tennessee
Shelby County 293 7,213 4.1
Texas
Bexar County 623 11,609 5.4
Dallas County 2,132 22,093 9.7
Harris County 2,512 30,800 8.2
Tarrant County 672 11,757 5.7
Travis County 2,144 10,725 20.0
Washington
King County 4,853 11,680 41.5

Abbreviations: PrEP, preexposure prophylaxis; n/a, not available.
aEstimated using 2017 data from IQVIA pharmacy database.
bEstimated using 2017 data from National HIV Surveillance System, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and American Census Survey.
cPrEP coverage, reported as a percentage, was calculated as the number who have been prescribed PrEP divided by the estimated number of persons who had indications for PrEP.
dBecause of reliability concerns, PrEP prescription data for the jurisdiction are not reported.
ePopulation-based data not available to make the estimate.

Table 6d. Number of persons prescribed PrEP, number of persons with PrEP indications, and PrEP coverage in 2018, among persons aged ≥16 years, by selected characteristics—United States
Persons prescribed PrEPa Persons with PrEP indicationsb PrEP coveragec
No. No. %
Sex at birth
Male 204,812 986,476 20.8
Female 14,770 225,301 6.6
Age at infection (yr)
16–24 28,860 253,709 11.4
25–34 91,077 423,548 21.5
35–44 51,083 233,252 21.9
45–54 31,300 180,400 17.4
≥55 17,371 120,868 14.4
Race/ethnicityd
Asian/Other 9,437 n/a n/a
Black/African American 28,243 479,443 5.9
Hispanic/Latino 33,503 307,689 10.9
White 147,454 350,238 42.1
Total 219,691 1,211,777 18.1

Abbreviations: PrEP, preexposure prophylaxis; n/a, not available.
aEstimated using 2018 data from IQVIA pharmacy database.
bEstimated using 2017 data from National HIV Surveillance System, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and American Census Survey.
cPrEP coverage, reported as a percentage, was calculated as the number who have been prescribed PrEP divided by the estimated number of persons who had indications for PrEP.
dRace/ethnicity data were only available for 35% of persons prescribed PrEP in 2018. Number prescribed PrEP and PrEP coverage for race/ethnicity reported in the table were adjusted applying the distribution of records with known race/ethnicity to records with missing race/ethnicity.

Table 6e. Number of persons prescribed PrEP, number of persons with PrEP indications, and PrEP coverage in 2018, among persons aged ≥16 years, by area of residence—United States
Persons prescribed PrEPa Persons with PrEP indicationsb PrEP coveragec
Area of residence No. No. %
Alabama 1,513 11,421 13.2
Alaska 189 2,288 8.3
Arizona 3,521 26,829 13.1
Arkansas 611 4,878 12.5
California 36,272 165,645 21.9
Colorado 3,428 25,695 13.3
Connecticut 2,292 10,741 21.3
Delaware 402 4,600 8.7
District of Columbia 5,014 13,752 36.5
Florida 13,623 122,502 11.1
Georgia 6,154 40,504 15.2
Hawaii 668 5,490 12.2
Idaho 377 3,761 10.0
Illinois 14,438 53,854 26.8
Indiana 2,170 21,441 10.1
Iowa 1,184 4,209 28.1
Kansas 759 5,449 13.9
Kentucky 1,231 13,342 9.2
Louisiana 3,468 15,231 22.8
Maine 390 3,271 11.9
Maryland 4,008 27,978 14.3
Massachusetts 8,195 24,507 33.4
Michigan 3,453 28,239 12.2
Minnesota 3,542 23,417 15.1
Mississippi 654 5,072 12.9
Missouri 2,781 19,545 14.2
Montana 173 2,629 6.6
Nebraska 487 2,597 18.8
Nevada 1,477 10,904 13.5
New Hampshire 497 2,372 21.0
New Jersey 4,652 27,723 16.8
New Mexico 790 6,598 12.0
New York 30,572 74,419 41.1
North Carolina 3,682 33,179 11.1
North Dakota 166 1,119 14.8
Ohio 4,715 40,578 11.6
Oklahoma 827 10,820 7.6
Oregon 2,753 20,255 13.6
Pennsylvania 8,402 36,617 22.9
Puerto Rico 225 n/ad n/a
Rhode Island 842 4,449 18.9
South Carolina 1,198 10,249 11.7
South Dakota 106 934 11.3
Tennessee 2,602 22,898 11.4
Texas 17,628 123,538 14.3
Utah 1,496 6,831 21.9
Vermont 264 1,491 17.7
Virginia 3,177 33,424 9.5
Washington 8,798 35,255 25.0
West Virginia 358 3,706 9.7
Wisconsin 2,017 14,121 14.3
Wyoming 70 1,411 5.0

Abbreviation: PrEP, preexposure prophylaxis.
aEstimated using 2018 data from IQVIA pharmacy database.
bEstimated using 2017 data from National HIV Surveillance System, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and American Census Survey.
cPrEP coverage, reported as a percentage, was calculated as the number who have been prescribed PrEP divided by the estimated number of persons who had indications for PrEP.
dPopulation-based data not available to make the estimate.

Table 6f. Number of persons prescribed PrEP, number of persons with PrEP indications, and PrEP coverage in 2018, among persons aged ≥16 years, by area of residence—Ending the HIV Epidemic Phase I jurisdictions
Persons prescribed PrEPa Persons with PrEP indicationsb PrEP coveragec
Area of residence No. No. %
Arizona
Maricopa County 2,860 17,228 16.6
California
Alameda County 1,844 7,296 25.3
Los Angeles County 12,121 41,822 29.0
Orange County 1,607 10,094 15.9
Riverside County 1,287 11,163 11.5
Sacramento County 740 5,381 13.8
San Bernardino County 579 12,132 4.8
San Diego County 3,347 15,150 22.1
San Francisco County 8,121 11,427 71.1
District of Columbia 5,014 13,752 36.5
Florida
Broward County 2,701 17,445 15.5
Duval County 365 8,533 4.3
Hillsborough County 751 12,578 6.0
Miami-Dade County 3,801 22,227 17.1
Orange County 1,711 15,027 11.4
Palm Beach County 555 7,647 7.3
Pinellas County 704 10,502 6.7
Georgia
Cobb County 375 3,396 11.0
DeKalb County 1,159 5,921 19.6
Fulton County 2,502 11,112 22.5
Gwinnett County 449 3,374 13.3
Illinois
Cook County 11,897 37,802 31.5
Indiana
Marion County 836 7,555 11.1
Louisiana
East Baton Rouge Parish 441 1,221 36.1
Orleans Parish 1,399 5,231 26.7
Maryland
Baltimore City 548 6,304 8.7
Montgomery County 803 5,551 14.5
Prince George’s County 658 3,640 18.1
Massachusetts
Suffolk County 2,628 6,025 43.6
Michigan
Wayne County 982 8,796 11.2
Nevada
Clark County 1,251 8,847 14.1
New Jersey
Essex County 628 5,134 12.2
Hudson County 867 4,333 20.0
New York
Bronx County 1,998 5,957 33.5
Kings County 6,249 13,551 46.1
New York County 12,661 14,657 86.4
Queens County 3,342 8,846 37.8
North Carolina
Mecklenburg County 894 8,499 10.5
Ohio
Cuyahoga County 805 7,416 10.9
Franklin County 1,588 12,302 12.9
Hamilton County 442 6,568 6.7
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia County 3,143 7,710 40.8
Puerto Rico
San Juan Municipio n/ad n/ae n/a
Tennessee
Shelby County 469 7,213 6.5
Texas
Bexar County 1,054 11,609 9.1
Dallas County 3,172 22,093 14.4
Harris County 3,987 30,800 12.9
Tarrant County 1,187 11,757 10.1
Travis County 3,438 10,725 32.1
Washington
King County 6,140 11,680 52.6

Abbreviations: PrEP, preexposure prophylaxis; n/a, not available.
aEstimated using 2018 data from IQVIA pharmacy database.
bEstimated using 2017 data from National HIV Surveillance System, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and American Census Survey.
cPrEP coverage, reported as a percentage, was calculated as the number who have been prescribed PrEP divided by the estimated number of persons who had indications for PrEP.
dBecause of reliability concerns, PrEP prescription data for the jurisdiction are not reported.
ePopulation-based data not available to make the estimate.

Table 7. Ending the HIV Epidemic Phase I jurisdictions
Counties Territories States
Arizonaa Puerto Ricoa,b Alabama
Maricopa Countya San Juan Municipioa,b Arkansas
California Kentucky
Alameda County Mississippi
Los Angeles County Missouri
Orange County Oklahoma
Riverside County South Carolina
Sacramento County
San Bernardino County
San Diego County
San Francisco County
District of Columbia
Florida
Broward County
Duval County
Hillsborough County
Miami-Dade County
Orange County
Palm Beach County
Pinellas County
Georgia
Cobb County
DeKalb County
Fulton County
Gwinnett County
Illinois
Cook County
Indiana
Marion County
Louisiana
East Baton Rouge Parish
Orleans Parish
Maryland
Baltimore City
Montgomery County
Prince George’s County
Massachusetts
Suffolk County
Michigan
Wayne County
Nevadaa
Clark Countya
New Jerseyc
Essex Countyc
Hudson Countyc
New York
Bronx County
Kings County
New York County
Queens County
North Carolina
Mecklenburg County
Ohio
Cuyahoga County
Franklin County
Hamilton County
Pennsylvaniac
Philadelphia County
Tennessee
Shelby County
Texas
Bexar County
Dallas County
Harris County
Tarrant County
Travis County
Washington
King County

Abbreviations: CDC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [footnotes only]; PrEP, preexposure prophylaxis [footnotes only]; CD4, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (cells/µL) or percentage [footnotes only].
Note. For more information on the Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America initiative, see https://www.hiv.gov/federal-response/ending-the-hiv-epidemic/overviewexternal icon. Estimates of HIV incidence and knowledge of status not provided for Phase I counties and territories (except the District of Columbia).
aLinkage to care and viral suppression data are not provided for states and associated counties that have incomplete reporting of laboratory data to CDC: Arkansas, Arizona, Kansas, Kentucky, Nevada, Puerto Rico, and Vermont.
bBecause of reliability concerns, PrEP data are not reported.
cLinkage to care and viral suppression data are not provided for states and associated counties that do not have laws requiring reporting of all CD4 and viral load laboratory results: Idaho, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania (excluding Philadelphia County).