Important update: Healthcare facilities
CDC has updated select ways to operate healthcare systems effectively in response to COVID-19 vaccination. Learn more
UPDATE
Given new evidence on the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant, CDC has updated the guidance for fully vaccinated people. CDC recommends universal indoor masking for all teachers, staff, students, and visitors to K-12 schools, regardless of vaccination status. Children should return to full-time in-person learning in the fall with layered prevention strategies in place.
UPDATE
The White House announced that vaccines will be required for international travelers coming into the United States, with an effective date of November 8, 2021. For purposes of entry into the United States, vaccines accepted will include FDA approved or authorized and WHO Emergency Use Listing vaccines. More information is available here.
UPDATE
Travel requirements to enter the United States are changing, starting November 8, 2021. More information is available here.

COVID-19 Vaccines for Healthcare Personnel

COVID-19 Vaccines for Healthcare Personnel

Healthcare personnel continue to be on the front line of the nation’s fight against COVID-19. By providing critical care to those who are or might be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, some healthcare personnel are at increased risk of infection from COVID-19. All healthcare personnel are recommended to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

covid-19 vaccine

Tips for How to Get a COVID-19 Vaccine

If you have not already been vaccinated against COVID-19, you can:

  • Talk to your healthcare administrative staff to determine if a vaccine can be made available to you on site.
  • If a vaccine is not available on site, Vaccines.gov can assist with finding vaccination providers near you.

Find a COVID-19 vaccine: Search vaccines.gov, text your ZIP code to 438829, or call 1-800-232-0233 to find locations near you.

Information about COVID-19 Vaccines for Healthcare Professionals

You can help protect yourself and your patients by getting a COVID-19 vaccine when it is available.

Learn more about who is eligible for a COVID-19 booster shot.


three masked medical professionals

After getting vaccinated, some people have side effects. Common side effects include:

  • Pain, redness, or swelling where you get your shot
  • Tiredness
  • Headache
  • Muscle pain
  • Chills
  • Fever
  • Nausea

These are normal signs that your body is building protection against COVID-19. Learn more about possible side effects and what to expect after getting your COVID-19 vaccine.

After You Are Fully Vaccinated

For non-healthcare settings:

After you are fully vaccinated against COVID-19, you can resume activities in non-healthcare settings that you did prior to the pandemic. Learn more about what you can do when you have been fully vaccinated.

For healthcare settings:

When you are working in a healthcare setting, different infection prevention and control guidance will apply. Learn more: Updated Healthcare Infection Prevention and Control Recommendations in Response to COVID-19 Vaccination.

Safe, Easy, Free, and Nearby COVID-19 Vaccination

The federal government is providing the vaccine free of charge to all people living in the U.S., regardless of their immigration or health insurance status.

COVID-19 Vaccines Are Free